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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2011
Dr. Louise Schnaufer, an internationally renowned pediatric surgeon who had been associated with Union Memorial Hospital and Johns Hopkins Hospital early in her career, died Oct. 14 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Cathedral Village, a Philadelphia retirement community. The former Ruxton resident was 86. The daughter of shopkeepers, Dr. Louise Schnaufer was born in Towson and lived above her family's York Road general store, F. W. Schnaufer and Son, which had been established in Towson in the late 19th century by her late paternal grandfather.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
Dr. Jacob C. Handelsman, a retired Baltimore surgeon whose career spanned six decades at Johns Hopkins Hospital, died July 1 from complications of dementia at Roland Park Place. He was 94. The son of immigrant parents from Europe who owned and operated a pants factory, Jacob Charles Handelsman was born and raised in Elizabeth, N.J., where he graduated in 1936 from Thomas Jefferson High School. "My choice since age 10 was to go to 'Johns' Hopkins. I even knew how to spell it," Dr. Handelsman wrote in an extensive, unpublished two-volume memoir.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 16, 2013
Dr. Jacob C. Handelsman, a retired Baltimore surgeon whose career spanned six decades at Johns Hopkins Hospital, died July 1 from complications of dementia at Roland Park Place. He was 94. The son of immigrant parents from Europe who owned and operated a pants factory, Jacob Charles Handelsman was born and raised in Elizabeth, N.J., where he graduated in 1936 from Thomas Jefferson High School. "My choice since age 10 was to go to Johns' Hopkins. I even knew how to spell it," Dr. Handelsman wrote in an extensive, unpublished two-volume memoir.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2011
Dr. Louise Schnaufer, an internationally renowned pediatric surgeon who had been associated with Union Memorial Hospital and Johns Hopkins Hospital early in her career, died Oct. 14 of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Cathedral Village, a Philadelphia retirement community. The former Ruxton resident was 86. The daughter of shopkeepers, Dr. Louise Schnaufer was born in Towson and lived above her family's York Road general store, F. W. Schnaufer and Son, which had been established in Towson in the late 19th century by her late paternal grandfather.
NEWS
By Michael James and David Michael Ettlin and Michael James and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writers Staff writers Norris P. West and JoAnna Daemmrich contributed to this article | November 23, 1993
Baltimore lost another of its children to gunfire yesterday -- a 13-year-old boy who died in a spray of bullets aimed into a housing project apartment on the city's east side.Police said the shots were fired from an assault rifle through a living room window of the two-story Hollander Ridge dwelling, allegedly by a 17-year-old neighbor who was being sought on a murder charge last night."The inside of the house was riddled with bullets -- in the rear wall, the ceiling, the refrigerator, all over," said Police Agent Doug Price as investigators went through the ground floor digging out the slugs as evidence.
NEWS
July 17, 1999
FOR Helen Brooke Taussig, it was a lifetime affair of the heart. Through her scientific vision and human compassion, thousands of gasping "blue babies" once condemned to an early death or severe invalidism gained a new life.The Johns Hopkins pediatric cardiologist conceived of an operation to repair heart birth defects in children whose blood was starved of oxygen, turning their skin a bluish hue.The historic 1944 operation connected a major artery out of the heart to the artery going into the lungs, increasing the vital supply of oxygen to the blood.
NEWS
December 11, 2009
The president and CEO of Greater Baltimore Medical Center is stepping down after a decade on the job to take over the helm of a hospital in Pennsylvania. Laurence M. Merlis is leaving GBMC HealthCare to become president and chief executive officer of Abington Health and Abington Memorial Hospital in Montgomery County, Pa. Over the course of his tenure, Merlis created an affiliation between the Towson health system and Johns Hopkins Medicine in such clinical areas as cardiology and pediatric surgery.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | May 30, 1992
Dr. Bruce Reitz, chief heart surgeon at Johns Hopkins Hospital and the man who pioneered the heart-lung transplant, said yesterday he will leave Baltimore to direct the heart and chest surgery program at Stanford University.He will begin work at Stanford in July, specializing in pediatric heart surgery, and in January will succeed his mentor, Dr. Norman Shumway, a world-renowned surgeon who performed the nation's first heart transplant 24 years ago.Dr. Shumway, 69, will step down as chairman of Stanford's department of cardiac and thoracic surgery but will continue working there for some time, according to a Stanford spokesman.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | July 21, 2007
Johns Hopkins Medicine and the Greater Baltimore Medical Center announced yesterday an alliance that, among other things, puts Hopkins doctors in charge of cardiac care at the Towson hospital. The five-year partnership, in the works for the past year and half, includes a joint pediatric surgery project and calls for exploration into possible clinical practice partnerships and shared satellite health care centers. Cooperative research efforts that could help connect area residents with local clinical trials will also be discussed.
NEWS
December 11, 2009
$42.6 million road project to begin at APG Despite a shortfall in transportation revenue, Maryland is about to launch a $42.6 million intersection improvement project near the Aberdeen Proving Ground - the first project to improve access to the base in preparation for an influx of thousands of workers whose jobs are moving to Harford County under the Pentagon's Base Relocation and Closure program. Gov. Martin O'Malley and other high-ranking officials will gather in Aberdeen on Friday to announce that the State Highway Administration will break ground next fall on a series of upgrades at U.S. 40, Route 715 and other roads near the base.
NEWS
July 17, 1999
FOR Helen Brooke Taussig, it was a lifetime affair of the heart. Through her scientific vision and human compassion, thousands of gasping "blue babies" once condemned to an early death or severe invalidism gained a new life.The Johns Hopkins pediatric cardiologist conceived of an operation to repair heart birth defects in children whose blood was starved of oxygen, turning their skin a bluish hue.The historic 1944 operation connected a major artery out of the heart to the artery going into the lungs, increasing the vital supply of oxygen to the blood.
NEWS
By Michael James and David Michael Ettlin and Michael James and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writers Staff writers Norris P. West and JoAnna Daemmrich contributed to this article | November 23, 1993
Baltimore lost another of its children to gunfire yesterday -- a 13-year-old boy who died in a spray of bullets aimed into a housing project apartment on the city's east side.Police said the shots were fired from an assault rifle through a living room window of the two-story Hollander Ridge dwelling, allegedly by a 17-year-old neighbor who was being sought on a murder charge last night."The inside of the house was riddled with bullets -- in the rear wall, the ceiling, the refrigerator, all over," said Police Agent Doug Price as investigators went through the ground floor digging out the slugs as evidence.
NEWS
By Raymond L. Sanchez and Raymond L. Sanchez,Evening Sun Staff | September 25, 1991
The "Little Miracle Man" has gone home.Quantae "Pookie" Johnson, 4, who survived a bullet in his brain, walked out of Johns Hopkins Hospital yesterday, as doctors held a news conference to express "outrage" at a surge in random gunfire against children.The smiling Quantae, wearing a blue hat with his nickname on it, left Hopkins 17 days after being struck by a stray bullet and a week after doctors removed the large-caliber slug from his head.He survived without suffering any serious physical problems, doctors said.
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