Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPecan Pie
IN THE NEWS

Pecan Pie

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 7, 2004
Suzanne Conrad, winner of the 41st Pillsbury Bake-Off's million-dollar prize, says she knew she had a winner when her 90-year-old grandmother, Dora "Nana" Sullivan, who taught her to cook, asked for the recipe. Inspired by pecan pie, Conrad, a mother of two, mixed crumbled granola bars, oats, walnuts and chocolate chips in a filling that was baked in a refrigerated pie crust. "It's a lot of money for a little effort," Conrad, 35, told the Associated Press, adding that her prize money would go into a college fund for her 3-year-old son and 1-year-old daughter and to pay off loans for her master's degree in library science.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
Linda Settles from Havre de Grace was looking for a recipe for brown sugar pie that duplicated the one her grandmother used to make. She said her grandmother had five daughters but none of them remember how she made the pie. Jeannie Armstrong from Dayton, MD found a recipe for the pie in a cookbook she bought at an antique store years ago. It was first published in 1915 and revised in 1944. I tested the recipe that she kindly sent in and found that it needed a little tweaking.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By GAIL FORMAN | November 27, 1994
What's fall without pecan pie? Fresh and abundant at this season, the native American pecan nut has long been associated with cool weather and end-of-year holiday treats. For those of you who didn't get enough of Aunt Jen's pecan pie at Thanksgiving and can't wait for Uncle Harry's Christmas version, try baking one for yourself.Basic pecan pies are a cinch to prepare. The ingredients need only be stirred together by hand and poured into a pastry shell. The usual baking temperature is 350 degrees but pecan pie is so adaptable that it can be baked at higher or lower temperatures with similar results, a convenience when the pie is baked along with other foods in the same oven.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | November 1, 2006
To add even more pleasure to the most indulgent meal of the year, I searched for beverages that would complement Thanksgiving pies. I ate the traditional troika of pies - pumpkin, pecan and cranberry-apple - and ended up picking a tawny port, champagne and premium bourbon as their ideal companions. For this endeavor I put myself in the hands of Nelson Carey, the owner of Grand Cru, a wine bar and liquor store in Belvedere Square in North Baltimore. Carey, a trained sommelier, brightened at the prospect of picking beverages to be sipped at the end of the Thanksgiving meal.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | October 14, 1992
Believing as I do that an infusion of chocolate improves the flavor of almost every food -- with the possible exception of breakfast cereals -- I was anxious to try dumping 14 ounces of chocolate into a pecan pie.In addition to being rabidly pro-chocolate, I am positively tepid about pecan pie. I like pie. And I like pecans. But somehow when the two come together the result is either too gooey or too fluffy to send me into ecstasy.I am also pro-ecstasy, especially in matters of dessert.So when my wife, who is pro-pecan pie, came across the recipe for chocolate pecan chocolate chunk pie in Marcel Desaulniers new cookbook "Death by Chocolate" (Rizzoli, $25)
FEATURES
November 25, 1992
Pumpkin may have been the Pilgrims' pride, but in many homes today, it just isn't Thanksgiving without pecan pie.The basic recipe -- eggs, corn syrup, sugar, vanilla and lots of pecans -- is ripe for experiment.Chocolate and bourbon come to mind as successful additions. Simply sprinkle in a few chocolate chunks along with the pecans; or, soak the nuts in bourbon for a day or so before making the pie.Golden ambrosia pecan pie combines elements of a Southern staple, ambrosia salad, with pecan pie.Classic pecan pie3 eggs3 heaping tablespoons sugar1 tablespoon flour1 cup white corn syrup1 cup pecans1 teaspoon vanillaunbaked pastry for a 9-inch pieHeat oven to 350 degrees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2013
Linda Settles from Havre de Grace was looking for a recipe for brown sugar pie that duplicated the one her grandmother used to make. She said her grandmother had five daughters but none of them remember how she made the pie. Jeannie Armstrong from Dayton, MD found a recipe for the pie in a cookbook she bought at an antique store years ago. It was first published in 1915 and revised in 1944. I tested the recipe that she kindly sent in and found that it needed a little tweaking.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | June 3, 1998
Pecan pie is easy to make, easier to eatPecan pie is a great, decadent picnic dessert. It needs no refrigeration and tastes wonderful at room temperature.Easy As Pie Pecan Pie3 eggs, beaten1 cup sugar1 cup corn syrup2 teaspoons vanilla3 tablespoons butter, melted1 1/2 cups pecan halves1 9-inch unbaked pie crustCombine first 5 ingredients but do not overbeat. Add pecans, pour into pie crust. Bake in a preheated 350 degree oven for 45-55 minutes.For bacon fans stripped of timeIt was an idea whose time had to come.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2004
Nancy Gabriel of Eldersburg requested a muffin recipe. She wrote: "Years ago I had a recipe I cut from a paper for bran muffins which called for Grape-Nuts cereal. The recipe could be refrigerated for up to a week. My daughter has never forgiven me for losing that wonderful recipe. Help!" Toni Martin of Rapid City, S.D., responded. "This recipe is easy to double. It's also my daughter's favorite with grape jelly!" Recipe requests Carol Kowalski of Amsterdam, N.Y., wrote that her mother made the most delicious "Pineapple Super Chiffon Pie. It had an ingredient called TenBelow which was in a 3- to 4-ounce can, was a liquid and not frozen.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | August 17, 2005
Blandy's Alvada 5-Year-Old Madeira ($15/500 milliliters). Madeira, grown on a Portuguese island off the African coast, is one of the world's most distinctive styles of dessert wine, with piercing acidity balancing the caramel sweetness. The Madeira Wine Co. has done a very good job in introducing this unusual blend of bual and malmsey, two grapes that usually stand on their own. It's a distinctly sweet wine, but not at all treacly, and very smooth on the palate. It combines flavors of raisins, spices, lemon, nuts and honey.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | August 17, 2005
Blandy's Alvada 5-Year-Old Madeira ($15/500 milliliters). Madeira, grown on a Portuguese island off the African coast, is one of the world's most distinctive styles of dessert wine, with piercing acidity balancing the caramel sweetness. The Madeira Wine Co. has done a very good job in introducing this unusual blend of bual and malmsey, two grapes that usually stand on their own. It's a distinctly sweet wine, but not at all treacly, and very smooth on the palate. It combines flavors of raisins, spices, lemon, nuts and honey.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen | November 26, 2004
DAY PLANNER: "Day After Thanksgiving" 7 a.m.: If awake, go back to sleep, for the love of God. 10:30 a.m.: See above. 11-11:45 a.m.: You will feel bloated and possibly hung over. Sit in your favorite chair with your favorite coffee and watch your favorite dogs as they sleep, dream, twitch and make unpleasant bodily sounds. This is what they do when you're at work - except they don't sleep in their doggie beds. They climb on the good sofa. 11:45 a.m.: Stop watching the dogs and pay attention to your guests, i.e. the family.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 7, 2004
Suzanne Conrad, winner of the 41st Pillsbury Bake-Off's million-dollar prize, says she knew she had a winner when her 90-year-old grandmother, Dora "Nana" Sullivan, who taught her to cook, asked for the recipe. Inspired by pecan pie, Conrad, a mother of two, mixed crumbled granola bars, oats, walnuts and chocolate chips in a filling that was baked in a refrigerated pie crust. "It's a lot of money for a little effort," Conrad, 35, told the Associated Press, adding that her prize money would go into a college fund for her 3-year-old son and 1-year-old daughter and to pay off loans for her master's degree in library science.
NEWS
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2004
Nancy Gabriel of Eldersburg requested a muffin recipe. She wrote: "Years ago I had a recipe I cut from a paper for bran muffins which called for Grape-Nuts cereal. The recipe could be refrigerated for up to a week. My daughter has never forgiven me for losing that wonderful recipe. Help!" Toni Martin of Rapid City, S.D., responded. "This recipe is easy to double. It's also my daughter's favorite with grape jelly!" Recipe requests Carol Kowalski of Amsterdam, N.Y., wrote that her mother made the most delicious "Pineapple Super Chiffon Pie. It had an ingredient called TenBelow which was in a 3- to 4-ounce can, was a liquid and not frozen.
FEATURES
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN STAFF | November 28, 2002
My sister will fly from Providence to Baltimore today with a homemade apple pie on her lap. My friend Judy will drive from Chevy Chase to upstate New York with her homemade apple pie on the passenger seat. My sister-in-law will arrive from Princeton, N.J., bearing an exquisite homemade walnut tart. Now, imagine hundreds of thousands of similar baked goods criss-crossing the country, in the air, on highways and trains. Bumper to bumper pies, pouring out of Baltimore and landing in Hoboken, Westchester or Boston for Thanksgiving feasts.
FEATURES
By ELLEN HAWKS and ELLEN HAWKS,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2000
Anna Mary Upholster of Latrobe, Pa., requested a recipe for oatmeal pie. She wrote that none of her cookbooks has such a recipe. Tester Laura Reiley chose the recipe sent in by Mary Ann Peeples of Stedman, N.C. Peeples wrote that she found the recipe in a newspaper, the Kansas City Star. "It is easy to make and resembles a pecan pie." Pearl F. Lewison of Beresford, S.D., requested a prune pie recipe. Her answer came from Carol Reeves of Westport, Ore. Oatmeal Pie Serves 8-12 3 eggs, well-beaten 2/3 cup granulated sugar 1 cup brown sugar 2 tablespoons butter, softened 2/3 cup sweetened shredded coconut 2/3 cup quick-cooking oats 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 9-inch unbaked pie shell Combine all filling ingredients and pour mixture into the prepared pie shell.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | December 30, 1998
* Item: Ms. Desserts Oops Products* What you get: 10-12 slices* Cost: $10 to $12* Preparation time: 8 to 12 hours to defrost* Review: These marked-down products at the Ms. Desserts outlet stores in Woodlawn and Timonium are rejects from the retail line that typically cost $2 to $6 less and often have very few flaws. The pecan pie we bought had a few small cracks in the crust and the filling sagged in the middle, but the taste was first-rate. Though the pie resembled shoofly more than an authentic pecan, it was great warmed and then topped with ice cream.
FEATURES
By Rita Calvert and Rita Calvert,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 1996
Here's a sumptuous combination for the fall season -- pork loin chops in a bed of fresh spinach.To prepare spinach, place freshly washed leaves on a microwave-safe plate and cover loosely with plastic wrap. Microwave 1 to 2 minutes or until bright green and slightly wilted.For the salad, use the tender inner leaves of a head of romaine lettuce. Concoct a quick salad dressing by combining equal parts yogurt and mayonnaise with a squeeze of fresh lemon juice and a dash or two of soy sauce.A dessert of warm pecan pie from a bakery makes a sweet finish.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff | June 30, 1999
Bobbi Jo Beaver of Rapid City, S.D., was looking for a pecan-pie recipe made with unsalted butter that she called "luscious." She thought the name of it was "76th Street Cafe Pecan Pie." She was close. Stacey Politzer of Baltimore and Frances Morgan of Arbutus responded to her request with a recipe for "72 Market Street Pecan Pie," named after a restaurant in Venice, Calif. 72 Market Street Pecan Pie Serves 10 to 12 CRUST: 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon granulated sugar 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 1/2 cups (3 sticks)
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | December 30, 1998
* Item: Ms. Desserts Oops Products* What you get: 10-12 slices* Cost: $10 to $12* Preparation time: 8 to 12 hours to defrost* Review: These marked-down products at the Ms. Desserts outlet stores in Woodlawn and Timonium are rejects from the retail line that typically cost $2 to $6 less and often have very few flaws. The pecan pie we bought had a few small cracks in the crust and the filling sagged in the middle, but the taste was first-rate. Though the pie resembled shoofly more than an authentic pecan, it was great warmed and then topped with ice cream.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.