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By LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 28, 1996
ALGIERS, Algeria -- They killed two of her three brothers and shot dead her mother, a pious 55-year-old who made her living packing eggs into cartons.Now the killers want Houria Zaidat, too.The death threat came in a penciled message explaining why the 23-year-old woman from Algiers' working-class suburb of Harraga, the country's female judo champion since 1992, was being targeted."Death to those women who do not wear the veil," it said. "Death to women who practice sports."In Algeria, once promising and prosperous, a dirty war has been waged for the past four years to create a pure Islamic state.
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NEWS
By Ron Smith | March 31, 2011
It was said upon the creation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in April of 1949 that NATO's purpose was three-fold: to keep the Russians out, the Americans in and the Germans down. In the 1960s, French President Charles de Gaulle removed his forces from NATO joint command, feeling slighted by the U.S. and Great Britain. He built his own Force de Frappe — a three-pronged strike force designed to rain nuclear destruction on the Soviets in a quick response to any attack on La Belle France.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 27, 1993
MANILA, Philippines -- Pepsi's advertisements, splashed for weeks all over Philippine newspapers, radio and TV, were hardly subtle: "Today, you could be a millionaire!"From her tin-roofed shack in one of Manila's more squalid slums, Victoria Angelo couldn't resist. The unemployed mother of five and her husband, Juanito, who pedals people in a three-wheeled cab for about $4 a day, began drinking Pepsi with every meal and snack. Each morning, the family prayed for a specially marked bottle cap.And then, a miracle!
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | June 19, 1999
A lovely home decorated with Old Master paintings is something most people can only dream about. For Henry H. Weldon and his wife June, however, it is a gift to enjoy and cherish, the culmination of a lifetime of collecting and living with beautiful things.The Weldons bought their first painting more than 50 years ago, when they were newlyweds and "looking for something to put on our walls," recalled Henry Weldon in an interview this week.The Weldons were setting up their first home in New York City when, for $16, they picked up an old painting encrusted with grime at an auction in Greenwich Village.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 24, 1991
PHILADELPHIA, Germany -- On a flat, sandy stretch of land 30 miles east of Berlin sits a poor little farm village with the very un-German-sounding name of Philadelphia.It's a rundown place with one rutted main street, 294 residents, 95 brownish-gray houses, a three-room Town Hall and a two-room schoolhouse that had to close because it was too expensive to keep open. There is no hotel and just one Kneipe, or pub, where the locals go to drink.The place has a lot in common with its namesake across the sea.Its economy is collapsing.
NEWS
By Kevin Cullen and Kevin Cullen,BOSTON GLOBE | August 30, 1997
BOSTON -- It was called Black '47, though few Americans know the phrase.Black '47 refers to 1847, the worst year of the Irish famine, a potato blight that between 1845 and 1850 killed more than 1 million people and forced another 1.5 million to emigrate, most of them to North America. Many historians cite August as the worst month of Black '47, when the most people died or left Ireland.Besides setting in motion a sustained wave of immigration that has made the Irish one of the world's great nomadic peoples, the famine shaped the social, ethnic, religious and political fabric of several cities along the East Coast.
FEATURES
April 15, 1998
Editor's note: Three hungry soldiers come to a town where all the food has been hidden. But once their soup of water and stones is done, the town enjoys a feast.When the peasants heard that three soldiers were coming down the road, they talked among themselves."Here come three soldiers. Soldiers are always hungry. But we have little enough for ourselves." And they hurried to hide their food.They pushed sacks of barley under the hay in the lofts. They lowered buckets of milk down the wells.
NEWS
By FRANK SMYTH | April 24, 1994
Rwanda's Tutsi kings ruled over Hutu peasant farmers for three centuries. But in 1959, the Hutu finally overthrew the Tutsi monarchy. From then until President Juvenal Habyarimana's death two weeks ago, Hutu have ruled the country. But today, Tutsi guerrillas of the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) are fighting their way toward power.If the RPF defeats the predominantly Hutu Rwandan army, the question is whether it would share power with Hutu, who make up about 85 percent of the population. RPF leaders say they will.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
The Sun's recent editorial "Too much carbon, too little time" (Sept. 11) is in line with the global warming arguments which are based on forecasts rather than accumulated technical and political realities. The article states that CO2 levels are 142 percent higher today than before the Industrial Revolution which began about 1800. At that time there were 1 billion people in the world; today there are 7 billion; by 2050 there will be 9 billion and by 2100 there will be 12 billion. This is a 1,200 percent increase in population since 1800.
FEATURES
By Ron Grossman and Ron Grossman,Chicago Tribune | February 1, 1994
Siberia was Russia's Wild West -- or, to be more geographically correct, its Wild East.In "The Conquest of a Continent," historian W. Bruce Lincoln details Siberia's role in Russian history, one remarkably similar to that of the frontier in the development of the United States.The American West and Russia's Far East both were just across a mountain barrier from their country's original area of settlement. Both hinterlands were immense, sparsely populated regions that tempted the adventurous and restless.
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