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By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 15, 2003
KAI COUNTY, China - Seven weeks before her death, 15-year-old Deng Xiaofang sat on a small stool by her hospital bed and carefully wrote down what had happened to her, the story that family members say police had warned her not to tell and newspapers would later be ordered not to report. Deng was a dropout from a middle school in a mountain village. Her grammar was flawed, her vocabulary limited and heavy with local slang. But in neat handwriting in blue ink on nine lined pages of letter-size paper, the adopted daughter of farmers scrawled an account of her rape and the police's efforts to cover it up. Her new employers at a restaurant had put her in the hands of a stranger, she wrote, who sexually assaulted her, tried to pay her $6 and then left.
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FEATURES
By Ron Grossman and Ron Grossman,Chicago Tribune | February 1, 1994
Siberia was Russia's Wild West -- or, to be more geographically correct, its Wild East.In "The Conquest of a Continent," historian W. Bruce Lincoln details Siberia's role in Russian history, one remarkably similar to that of the frontier in the development of the United States.The American West and Russia's Far East both were just across a mountain barrier from their country's original area of settlement. Both hinterlands were immense, sparsely populated regions that tempted the adventurous and restless.
NEWS
By FRANK SMYTH | April 24, 1994
Rwanda's Tutsi kings ruled over Hutu peasant farmers for three centuries. But in 1959, the Hutu finally overthrew the Tutsi monarchy. From then until President Juvenal Habyarimana's death two weeks ago, Hutu have ruled the country. But today, Tutsi guerrillas of the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) are fighting their way toward power.If the RPF defeats the predominantly Hutu Rwandan army, the question is whether it would share power with Hutu, who make up about 85 percent of the population. RPF leaders say they will.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | March 31, 2011
It was said upon the creation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in April of 1949 that NATO's purpose was three-fold: to keep the Russians out, the Americans in and the Germans down. In the 1960s, French President Charles de Gaulle removed his forces from NATO joint command, feeling slighted by the U.S. and Great Britain. He built his own Force de Frappe — a three-pronged strike force designed to rain nuclear destruction on the Soviets in a quick response to any attack on La Belle France.
NEWS
By EVA BERTRAM AND KENNETH SHARPE | February 23, 1997
THE ANNUAL international drug testing contest is under way in Washington: On Feb. 27, President Clinton will judge how committed our Third World allies are to fighting our drug war and report to Congress.Countries that fail the test will be "decertified" - and will not only lose U.S. economic assistance but may also face trade sanctions. Democrats and Republicans alike gain a chance to prove their get-tough bona fides by castigating countries for being "soft on drugs" in a process that is as hypocritical as it is diversionary.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 24, 1991
PHILADELPHIA, Germany -- On a flat, sandy stretch of land 30 miles east of Berlin sits a poor little farm village with the very un-German-sounding name of Philadelphia.It's a rundown place with one rutted main street, 294 residents, 95 brownish-gray houses, a three-room Town Hall and a two-room schoolhouse that had to close because it was too expensive to keep open. There is no hotel and just one Kneipe, or pub, where the locals go to drink.The place has a lot in common with its namesake across the sea.Its economy is collapsing.
NEWS
By Kevin Cullen and Kevin Cullen,BOSTON GLOBE | August 30, 1997
BOSTON -- It was called Black '47, though few Americans know the phrase.Black '47 refers to 1847, the worst year of the Irish famine, a potato blight that between 1845 and 1850 killed more than 1 million people and forced another 1.5 million to emigrate, most of them to North America. Many historians cite August as the worst month of Black '47, when the most people died or left Ireland.Besides setting in motion a sustained wave of immigration that has made the Irish one of the world's great nomadic peoples, the famine shaped the social, ethnic, religious and political fabric of several cities along the East Coast.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 8, 2006
Hollee Paterson of Baltimore was looking for a recipe for Welsh rarebit, preferably made without beer. Jenny McKenzie from Windsor, Colo., sent in a recipe for this classic dish taken from what she calls her "cooking bible": Betty Crocker's Picture Cookbook, published in 1950. She says she grew up with this cookbook in her mother's kitchen and was very pleased to inherit her grandmother's copy. The introduction to this recipe says that long ago in Wales the peasants were not permitted to hunt on the estates of noblemen, so they created this savory and satisfying dish, which substituted melted cheese for rabbit, the prize of the hunt.
FEATURES
April 15, 1998
Editor's note: Three hungry soldiers come to a town where all the food has been hidden. But once their soup of water and stones is done, the town enjoys a feast.When the peasants heard that three soldiers were coming down the road, they talked among themselves."Here come three soldiers. Soldiers are always hungry. But we have little enough for ourselves." And they hurried to hide their food.They pushed sacks of barley under the hay in the lofts. They lowered buckets of milk down the wells.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 17, 1995
PASO REAL, Mexico -- Just eight miles up a rutted mountain road from the modern highway linking glitzy Acapulco with the new Ixtapa resort sits a concrete mausoleum for five men who lived and died in a Mexico that few international beach-goers will ever know.This Mexico is so poor that peasants must sell pigs to buy fertilizer, so unsafe that, for fear of robbers, they dare not carry cash from those sales with them when they go to the county seat for supplies.And it is so violent that even such a precaution ultimately did not protect them.
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