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By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 17, 1998
At the end of Iraq's abysmal war with Iran, an eight-year debacle in which 120,000 Iraqis died, Saddam Hussein built a victory monument on the outskirts of Baghdad. The arch featured a pair of massive hands gripping two crossed swords."The most important thing to understand about Saddam is when given a choice between a peaceful or violent end Saddam prefers the violent way," said Laurie Mylroie, an associate of the Foreign Policy Institute in Washington and co-author of a book on the Iraqi leader and the 1991 Persian Gulf war."
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FEATURES
By G. FRANCO ROMAGNOLI and G. FRANCO ROMAGNOLI,EATING WELL | January 13, 1999
For us Italians, food is a serious affair. For us, gastronomy is more a way of life than a way of cooking; food, the eating and the talking of it, is part of the texture of everyday life.Since the remotest of times, Italy has suffered invasions, pillaging and the resulting famines, the harshest of times for the rich and the poor: Under those conditions, food, the idea of food, escalates to become the most important event of the day. By now, food -- the whole pleasurable concept of it -- is in our blood.
FEATURES
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | March 11, 1998
Bravo, bread soups. Not one bread crumb goes to waste.For centuries, Italians have turned leftover loaves into scrumptious recycled repasts. Stale bread plumps as it absorbs the luscious flavors from the warm broth. It softens into a glorious texture, filled with the scent of fresh vegetables, legumes and herbs.Not so long ago, it was difficult to find rustic, artisan-style breads, the key ingredient in these soups. But now coarse-textured, hard-crusted beauties are sold in almost every supermarket.
NEWS
By Gady Epstein and Gady Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 19, 2004
JINGBIAN, China - Consigned by geology to be among China's poorest farmers, the peasants in northern Shaanxi province, on the front porch of the Gobi Desert, hoped for a better life under the Communist Party, which made its base in this region during the revolution. The farmers' great chance finally came during the 1990s, when the state allowed them to take part in private oil drilling, an ambitious experiment in free enterprise in the undeveloped Chinese countryside. But when the experiment ended abruptly last year, it became a disaster for tens of thousands of farmers, a failure ordained this time by both geology and Communist rule.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 14, 2003
SHANGSHAN, China - The oxygen tank at Wu Shengfu's side fills his scarred lungs with enough air to breathe but not enough to talk for long about why, at 48 years old, he will be dying soon. His friends do their best to help explain, even at the risk of being harassed by police, because many of them too will succumb to an early death. Slowly, the men of this village in central China are dying, and the local authorities here, having profited from their labors, would prefer that they die in silence.
FEATURES
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 20, 2000
KRASNY MAI, Russia - The little wooden houses sit dark and modest under a gray summer sky, their shelves heavy with the cut-glass champagne flutes, vases, bowls and tumblers that hold the inhabitants prisoner. Nearly everyone here works for the Krasny Mai - Red May - glass factory. They work, but most haven't been paid for five years. Instead of money, the factory doles out cut glass every month and a loaf of bread every day. Too poor to leave town, the people stay and work and dream of freedom, held in bondage by their cut glass.
NEWS
By Frank Clifford and Frank Clifford,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 2, 1997
LAGUNA MIRAMAR, Mexico -- From the air, the forest looks like a green blanket tossed over a campfire. It is tattered, scorched and smoldering -- slowly being burned to bits.The Selva Lacandona is Mexico's largest rain forest, but at least 40 percent of its original 4 million acres has been destroyed. Although commercial logging is the cause of destruction in many forests, it is not the main issue here. The remoteness and density of the Lacandona have protected much of it from the ravages of clear-cutting.
NEWS
By Reed Lindsay and Reed Lindsay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 30, 2003
BARINAS, Venezuela - Richard Padron was born under democracy and into modern-day vassalage. "My dad worked on a cattle ranch," says the sinewy Padron, 25, wearing mud-coated, black rubber boots and with a butcher knife in a leather sheath at his side. "The owner let him use five acres to grow corn and a few other crops to eat. The wages were enough for food, but not much else. I left school and began working with him when I was 14." Padron still lives in poverty. He and his wife and two children survive largely off corn, and they sleep in hammocks with several other families in a dilapidated concrete-block farmhouse.
NEWS
By Richard Mertens and Richard Mertens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 4, 1998
MAMINAS, Albania -- As Simona moos in her wooden hut, a group of village women recall the defining moment in the fall of communism here: the day they got their first cows.`It was such a happy day, a wonderful day,` says Syme Koni, 47, a thin, quiet woman who speaks with sudden ardor at the memory. `Everyone was surprised that we had something of our own, something that would belong to us forever. And I was happy because I would finally have more milk for myself, and to sell.`For almost half a century, Albanians suffered the harshest communist rule in Europe.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 15, 2003
KAI COUNTY, China - Seven weeks before her death, 15-year-old Deng Xiaofang sat on a small stool by her hospital bed and carefully wrote down what had happened to her, the story that family members say police had warned her not to tell and newspapers would later be ordered not to report. Deng was a dropout from a middle school in a mountain village. Her grammar was flawed, her vocabulary limited and heavy with local slang. But in neat handwriting in blue ink on nine lined pages of letter-size paper, the adopted daughter of farmers scrawled an account of her rape and the police's efforts to cover it up. Her new employers at a restaurant had put her in the hands of a stranger, she wrote, who sexually assaulted her, tried to pay her $6 and then left.
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