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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2012
Fresh peas are very hard to find at a supermarket, but you can find them at area farmers' markets from mid-May until the end of June. Be forewarned: At the Sunday farmers' market under the Jones Falls Expressway, you have to arrive early and stand in a line as many as 50 people deep to get the peas from Woodside Greenhouse. But the line moves quickly, and your patience will be rewarded with one of the most verdant tastes of a new summer. Fresh raw peas have a sweetness that is tempered by a grassy bite, and they taste great by themselves with a glug of extra-virgin olive oil, chopped mint leaves and a pinch of sea salt.
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NEWS
April 10, 2014
Blake Wollman has gone from a food processor in his kitchen at home to a commercial kitchen in Randallstown. He's progressed from selling his product at farmers markets to two distributors placing it in 50 locations in the Mid-Atlantic region. Now, Wollman is poised for a major expansion. By the end of 2014, he plans to triple the number of locations for his product, an all-natural, kosher hummus. "I want to saturate the Maryland market and penetrate the New York market," Wollman said of his company, The Wild Pea Hummous.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 10, 2009
The Black Eyed Peas are getting it started again. The pop/dance/hip-hop group has announced dates for its "The E.N.D. World Tour 2010," its first tour since 2006's "Monkey Business," and the group is heading to Washington. The Black Eyed Peas -- aka Fergie, will.i.am, apl.de.ap and Taboo -- are scheduled to play the Verizon Center in Washington at 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 23. Tickets go on sale at noon Dec. 12. Tickets cost $49.50, $72.50 and $92.50. The floor will be general admission and will have no seats.
NEWS
January 27, 2014
Artspower will perform "The Monster Who Ate My Peas" at the Amoss Center in Bel Air on Friday, Feb. 7, at 7 p.m. Based on the book by Danny Schnitzlein and Matt Faulkner, this new musical tells the funny and poignant story of a young boy who doesn't want to eat his peas. What would you give a monster to eat your peas? Children and adults alike will be entertained and engaged by this wonderfully written tale about the value of willpower. Tickets are $7 to $15 and are available at tickets.harford.edu, the HCC Ticket Office in the Chesapeake Center, or by calling 443-412-2211.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
Three weeks ago we told you that The Pea Man (aka Thomas McCarthy of Woodside Greenhouse, Caroline County) said he should be bringing peas in about three weeks. Three weeks later he brought peas. By 10 a.m. all of his peas were gone. And so was he. He'll be back next week with more peas. Still, the market seemed especially crowded on Mother's Day, and the craft booths were doing brisker business than usual. Baltimore Sun contributor John Houser III checked out the market's new pizza vendor, Pizza Ruby , which has just stepped in for the departed Red Zebra.
ENTERTAINMENT
by b staff | @bthesite | February 22, 2010
1. Black Eyed Peas at Verizon Center They got that boom boom pow, them chickens jackin' their style. Oh, sorry. The song is just so catchy! Hear it live -- and all those other great Black Eyed Peas songs you love! -- at the Verizon Center Tuesday night at 7:30. Tickets start at $49.50. AUBREY FORNWALT, B 2. Olympic men's ice hockey gold medal game We won't know who's playing in this game until later in the week, but there's a reason that it's the final gold medal event of the 2010 Winter Olympics: This is the Games' premier event.
NEWS
By ANNETTE GOOCH and ANNETTE GOOCH,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | July 4, 1999
"Eat your peas!" is seldom heard at the table when the subject of discussion is fresh petits pois, a French variety renowned for the delicacy and tiny size of the shelled peas (about half the size of English ones). Sweet, tender baby peas (even if they're not authentic petits pois) appeal to most children, especially if they've helped with the shelling. Another good reason for enlisting the aid of small hands: The smaller the peas, the more pea pods to be shelled. Spring and early summer are prime time for fresh peas, a cool-weather crop.
NEWS
January 27, 2014
Artspower will perform "The Monster Who Ate My Peas" at the Amoss Center in Bel Air on Friday, Feb. 7, at 7 p.m. Based on the book by Danny Schnitzlein and Matt Faulkner, this new musical tells the funny and poignant story of a young boy who doesn't want to eat his peas. What would you give a monster to eat your peas? Children and adults alike will be entertained and engaged by this wonderfully written tale about the value of willpower. Tickets are $7 to $15 and are available at tickets.harford.edu, the HCC Ticket Office in the Chesapeake Center, or by calling 443-412-2211.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | June 8, 2005
I DIDN'T KNOW it at the time, but the other day as I spooned down fresh spring peas, I was behaving in an au courant way. I was eating within my "foodshed." Modeled after a watershed, a foodshed is the area close to your home, some say within a 100-mile radius, that produces food. The idea is that by eating locally produced goods from this territory, you are encouraging more sustainable, ecologically sound practices and discouraging long-distance dining, that is, eating meals made with ingredients flown in from the other side of the globe.
NEWS
By Elinor Klivans and By Elinor Klivans,Special to the Sun | May 4, 2003
Every season has its colors. Summer is a color riot of flowers and fruit, fall has its warm yellows and oranges, winter features cozy browns with the occasional blanket of white. But, spring is green, all green. And, the green vegetables of spring range over the full palette. There is the dark green of baby spinach, the soft green of asparagus, the basic green of peas in the pod, snap and snow peas, and the deep, rich forest-green shades of fiddleheads and of ramps, those elusive wild leeks.
EXPLORE
Kit Waskom Pollard | April 15, 2013
The menu at Bel Air's Pairings Bistro changes throughout the year, evolving to highlight the best products from each season. This spring, Chef/owner Jon Kohler is serving small, succulent spring chickens, roasted and served with fresh peas and local mushrooms. Pairings Bistro 2105 Laurel Bush Road | Suite 108 | Bel Air, MD 21015 410-569-5006 | pairingsbistro.com Roast Poussin with Wild Mushrooms and Spring Pea Ragout Serves 6 Poussins: 6 poussins (spring chickens, preferably from KCC Natural Farms in Forest Hill)
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2012
Fresh peas are very hard to find at a supermarket, but you can find them at area farmers' markets from mid-May until the end of June. Be forewarned: At the Sunday farmers' market under the Jones Falls Expressway, you have to arrive early and stand in a line as many as 50 people deep to get the peas from Woodside Greenhouse. But the line moves quickly, and your patience will be rewarded with one of the most verdant tastes of a new summer. Fresh raw peas have a sweetness that is tempered by a grassy bite, and they taste great by themselves with a glug of extra-virgin olive oil, chopped mint leaves and a pinch of sea salt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
Three weeks ago we told you that The Pea Man (aka Thomas McCarthy of Woodside Greenhouse, Caroline County) said he should be bringing peas in about three weeks. Three weeks later he brought peas. By 10 a.m. all of his peas were gone. And so was he. He'll be back next week with more peas. Still, the market seemed especially crowded on Mother's Day, and the craft booths were doing brisker business than usual. Baltimore Sun contributor John Houser III checked out the market's new pizza vendor, Pizza Ruby , which has just stepped in for the departed Red Zebra.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | May 5, 2012
Halfway through the story about his life, Zeus rolled over to have his belly rubbed. He than sat patiently with his tongue lolling out of his mouth. The 8-year-old, 100-pound yellow English/American Labrador knew what was coming at the end of "My Dog Eats Peas" ... and it wasn't peas. It was a big dog bone. "We give him big dog bones because he is so big," said Tonya Neumeister, Zeus' owner and author of the children's book, "My Dog Eats Peas. " And while Zeus does like peas, as the story explains, peas are not exactly the best food for dogs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
When spuds were all greasers, they deserved to get kicked out of school. Deep-fat french fries and oily tater tots got the heave-ho from most cafeterias, as schools in Maryland and across the country tried to improve child nutrition. Potatoes that wanted to stay on the menu had to go to reform school, returning as low-fat, oven-baked "fries," baked potatoes or mashies made with skim milk. Now even those goody-two-shoes spuds face near-expulsion. Proposed federal nutritional requirements for the National School Lunch Program would allow school cafeterias to offer students no more than one cup of starchy vegetables per week.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2011
It's a good week for music in the region. Pretty much every day has a a major headliner perform in Baltimore or nearby. There's three country music acts (Emmylou Harris, Keith Urban, Dolly Parton), a corporate punk rock show (Vans Warped) and one that's on the indier side of things (Alphabet Bombers) and then there also shows by Black the Eyed Peas, Motley Crue and Lands & Peoples. On Tuesday , Emmylou Harris performs at Pier Six Pavilion, 731 Eastern Ave. Look for our review tomorrow.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | January 17, 1999
Hoppin' John is a time-honored dish in the American South. Originating most probably in the Caribbean, this combination of black-eyed peas, rice, bacon and onions has become an enduring classic of Louisiana creole and low-country Carolina cuisine.It's economical, easy to prepare and can be doubled or tripled to feed a crowd. But the best thing about this humble dish is that it's comforting, a delicious reminder of just how good plain, honest food can be. Serve the recipe below with your favorite greens dish.
NEWS
By Compiled from the archives of the Historical Society of Carroll County | July 3, 1994
50 Years Ago* The Community Mobilization Committee brings to the attention of the citizens of Carroll County the number one obligation of this agriculture community to the war effort. The processing and canning of peas, beans, corn and tomatoes during the season, June 12 through October 15, will produce 1,629,500 cases of these essential foods. The help of every available man, woman, boy and girl will be needed to complete the job. Our boys will get 141,060 cases of Carroll County peas, 58,250 cases of beans, 296,598 cases of tomatoes and 149,486 cases of corn.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2010
Halfway through the Black Eyed Peas' live show, rapper Taboo hops on a neon-glowing motorcycle and, using suspension wires, rides it out above the crowd — all while singing "Rockin' to the Beat. " "You never expect a flying motorcycle to hover over your head during the show," he said. "It takes the show to a different level. " Inspired by the '80s movie "Tron," the motorcycle is one of the more eyebrow-raising moments in a concert that's loaded with dizzying lights, props and special effects.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2010
Eris Weaver from Cotati, Calif., was looking for a recipe for a pasta salad made with salmon, peas and cottage cheese in the dressing. We had no luck locating the actual recipe, which the reader said came from a newsletter put out by Pacific Gas and Electric sometime in the mid- to late-1980s. However, it seemed like it was worth some research to try and find something similar. This is the time of year when cold pasta salads can make for a wonderful meal, and the combination sounded appetizing.
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