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By Jamie Smith Hopkins | jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | December 7, 2009
It happened 68 years ago today, but Clarence J.M. Davis can still clearly remember the noise, confusion, frenzied activity and deadliness of the attack that propelled the United States into World War II. The St. Mary's County resident, now 86, is one of a few dozen known survivors of the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor who are still alive and living in Maryland. He plans to mark the day, and remember the dead, at a ceremony scheduled for 12:30 p.m. at Maryland's World War II Memorial, beside Route 450 near Annapolis.
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NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins | jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | December 7, 2009
It happened 68 years ago today, but Clarence J.M. Davis can still clearly remember the noise, confusion, frenzied activity and deadliness of the attack that propelled the United States into World War II. The St. Mary's County resident, now 86, is one of a few dozen known survivors of the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor who are still alive and living in Maryland. He plans to mark the day, and remember the dead, at a ceremony scheduled for 12:30 p.m. at Maryland's World War II Memorial, beside Route 450 near Annapolis.
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NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1996
When West Point cadets and Annapolis midshipmen stand to "Remember Pearl Harbor" at today's Army-Navy football game in Philadelphia, the nation's future military leaders will be marking an historical event.But another group of men and women will board the Coast Guard cutter Roger B. Taney in Baltimore's Inner Harbor this morning with living memories of Dec. 7, 1941, when Japan's sneak attack on Hawaii hurled the United States into the furnace of World War II.For the first time, Joseph L. Alsop, 75, of Towson will be among them -- a new member of the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association (PHSA)
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF | December 7, 1996
When West Point cadets and Annapolis midshipmen stand to "Remember Pearl Harbor" at today's Army-Navy football game in Philadelphia, the nation's future military leaders will be marking an historical event.But another group of men and women will board the Coast Guard cutter Roger B. Taney in Baltimore's Inner Harbor this morning with living memories of Dec. 7, 1941, when Japan's sneak attack on Hawaii hurled the United States into the furnace of World War II.For the first time, Joseph L. Alsop, 75, of Towson will be among them -- a new member of the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association (PHSA)
NEWS
December 27, 1991
William H. Ruth died of cancer Wednesday at a nursing home in Edenton, N.C. He was 74.A memorial mass for Mr. Ruth will be offered at 11 a.m. Monday at the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5300 N. Charles St.He was born in West Baltimore and joined the Navy at age 17. He retired from the Navy as a first class boatswain mate after 30 years, then worked for the Firestone Tire and Rubber Co. in Baltimore for five years.He was a charter life member of the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association, North Carolina Chapter, and a past master of the Warren Lodge, Masonic Order, No. 51, in Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Chicago Tribune | December 7, 1990
CHICAGO -- Richard Foltynewicz, a lawnmower repairman and ex-Marine, is devoting his life to ensuring that the day that was to live in infamy doesn't die in obscurity.His crusade began in March, after he realized that people were forgetting Pearl Harbor Day. So Mr. Foltynewicz, 65, of Illinois, re-upped in the VFW and embarked on a multistate odyssey and letter-writing campaign to persuade lawmakers, journalists, business leaders and the public that Dec. 7 should be declared a permanent national holiday.
NEWS
December 6, 1990
An observance to mark the 49th anniversary of the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor will be held tomorrow aboard the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Taney in the Inner Harbor.Members of Maryland Chapter No. 1 of the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association and other service organizations will gather noon to hear an address by the U.S. Coast Guard commandant, Adm. J. William Kime. During the ceremony, Admiral Kime will present a spyglass used on the Taney during World War II to the Baltimore Maritime Museum.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker | November 18, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Their ranks dwindling, their uniforms retired, some 260 Maryland soldiers and sailors who defended Pearl Harbor against the Japanese received long-due recognition from their country yesterday.They were awarded a congressional commemorative medal -- noting their service and marking the 50th anniversary of the Dec. 7 attack that drew the United States into World War II -- during a special ceremony at the U.S. Naval Academy Chapel."I have not forgotten it," said Nat Lieberman, 70, wiping a tear from his eye. "Veterans remember.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 6, 1991
HONOLULU -- A few weeks ago, 72-year-old Marylander Frank Bartos wept over Pearl Harbor for the first time.The memories, he said yesterday, came hurtling: the burning oil, the charred bodies, the unimaginable pain that the wounded endured.At a poignant ceremony for survivors of the attack, the Camp Springs man lifted his eyes toward the blue Hawaiian sky as a giant 48-star flag was raised for the first time in honor of the Pearl Harbor dead.Mr. Bartos, a retired ticket manager for the then-Baltimore Colts, whispered: "Could be the crying's not over yet."
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | December 8, 2002
Aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Taney for yesterday's Pearl Harbor memorial ceremony, speakers said the attack 61 years ago is even more relevant today since the United States is again fighting foreign enemies after last year's Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Pearl Harbor survivors and others said there are lessons to learn from Dec. 7, 1941, when 2,403 Americans died in the Japanese attack on U.S. forces in Hawaii. "We gather here to remember that day, to remember those who made sacrifices on that day," said Alan Walden, master of ceremonies and co-chairman of the Baltimore Maritime Museum, of which the Taney is part.
NEWS
March 24, 2008
MARK FACTOR passed away Wednesday March 19, 2008 at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore, MD. He was born in Philadelphia, PA on Nov. 27, 1919, the son of the late George and Ida Goldberg Factor. He grew up in Philadelphia and attended the Mastbaum Vocational School. He enlisted in the Navy in 1938 and was aboard the USS St. Louis at Pearl Harbor during the attack on Dec. 7, 1941. He was a veteran of numerous naval battles of the Pacific including Leyte Gulf, Guadalcanal, Okinawa and Kolombangara.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2004
Hugh M. Roper, a Baltimore native who piloted 50 missions bombing bridges in Asia during World War II and later became the hometown face of the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association, died July 4 of an aortic aneurysm at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring. Mr. Roper was 82 and had recently moved from Columbia to the Riderwood Village Retirement Community, between Columbia and Silver Spring. Mr. Roper was a 1938 graduate of Forest Park High School and enlisted in 1940 in the Army Air Corps, which sent him to Hawaii -- where he attended college classes and was active in a local theater group as a young private.
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