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Pearl Harbor

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By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 3, 2009
J oseph Lloyd Alsop, who was stationed aboard a Navy minesweeper during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and later participated in the D-Day landing in Normandy, died Nov. 23 of respiratory failure at St. Joseph Medical Center. The longtime Towson resident was 88. Mr. Alsop was born and raised in Fredericksburg, Va., and after high school enlisted in the Navy in 1939. On Dec. 6, 1941, Mr. Alsop's ship, the USS Boggs, an old three-stack World War I-era destroyer that had been converted to a high-speed minesweeper, was steaming into Pearl Harbor after a week at sea towing targets for gunnery practice.
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NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | June 22, 2014
The signs were all there. This is what jumps out at you in perusing postmortems of the two greatest surprise attacks in American history. In the days and weeks leading up to Dec. 7, 1941 and Sept. 11, 2001, there were numerous clues that seem neon in hindsight, but which no one pursued. Or, as then-CIA Director George Tenet famously said of 9/11: "The system was blinking red. " In response to each attack, exhaustive probes were launched to determine whose incompetence allowed the disaster to happen.
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NEWS
December 7, 2011
Seventy years ago today, Japan launched a surprise attack on America's Pacific fleet in Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, drawing the United States into the second World War. More than 2,400 Americans were killed in the attack, including four Marylanders, all of whom were serving aboard the U.S.S. Arizona: Fireman 1st Class Howard T. Anderson; Boatswain's Mate 1st Class Clyde J. Rawson; Yeoman 2nd Class Jack M. Restivo; and Shipfitter 3rd Class Victor C. Tambolleo. The war that followed would take a terrible toll - including 770 from Maryland killed, 928 wounded and 18 missing in action.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
George F. Carter, a retired Army colonel who witnessed the Pearl Harbor attack as a young lieutenant, died of complications from a stroke Feb. 24 at the Oak Crest retirement center. The Timonium resident was 96. Born in Oakland, Calif., he was the son of Thomas Carter and Louise Carrau Carter. He earned a bachelor's degree at St. Mary's College of California in Moraga, where he enlisted in Reserve Officers Training Corps. He began his military service as a lieutenant and was assigned to the 25th Infantry Division in Hawaii.
BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Good morning it's December 7th and, yes, it's still a day that will live in infamy. Seventy-one years later, Pearl Harbor is attracting a fair amount of search traffic on the Internet. Things should pick up photo wise as remembrances get under way in Hawaii later this morning.  We're mostly relying on Twitter today because Google is being a bit stingy this week with the trends. The search giant hasn't updated its hot trends data since Tuesday. I know we all love the Victoria Secret Fashion Show , but I'm thinking America has finally moved on to something else.
NEWS
December 6, 1990
An observance to mark the 49th anniversary of the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor will be held tomorrow aboard the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Taney in the Inner Harbor.Members of Maryland Chapter No. 1 of the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association and other service organizations will gather noon to hear an address by the U.S. Coast Guard commandant, Adm. J. William Kime. During the ceremony, Admiral Kime will present a spyglass used on the Taney during World War II to the Baltimore Maritime Museum.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2012
Myrtle M. Watson, an Army nurse whose indelible memories of the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor remained with her for the rest of her life, died Feb. 11 of vascular disease at Oak Crest Village. The Northeast Baltimore resident was 98. Early in the morning of Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941, Mrs. Watson was busy working her first solo weekend assignment in the orthopedic ward at Schofield Hospital near Pearl Harbor, which was short-staffed because it was a weekend. She began pushing bedridden men out to a second-story lanai so they could take in a barefoot inter-regimental football game that was to be played on the hospital lawn.
NEWS
December 7, 1990
A year short of the 50th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor that drew America into World War II, the U.S. is again facing the prospect of an unpredictable war far from home.It may be recalled that the Pearl Harbor attack was precipitated by a U.S. economic embargo against Japan intended to force it to withdraw from China -- just as the U.N. sanctions now seek to dislodge Iraq from Kuwait. By 1945 Japan lay in ruins under American occupation. Yet the Chinese government we sought to protect ultimately fell anyway, as much a victim of its own inefficiency and corruption as of the communists.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | December 5, 1991
Fifty years ago this weekend -- Saturday, Dec. 6, 1941 (stock markets were open Saturday mornings until 1954) -- the Dow Jones average closed at 116.60, but the day after Pearl Harbor the DJ dropped 4 points, or 3 1/2 percent, equal to 102 points at today's level. Yesterday the Dow closed at 2,911.67, roughly 2,500 percent above its Pearl Harbor week level.,3 LOOKING BACK: New York and Baltimore newspapers (3 cents daily, 10 cents Sunday) of the Dec. 7, 1941 Pearl Harbor week show: Men's ties at Bloomingdale's, 69 cents (3 for $2)
NEWS
By ERNEST B. FURGURSON | December 1, 1991
Washington. -- In the hectic year of 1974, when Ted Agnew was out but Dick Nixon was still in, the venerable Gridiron Club of Washington satirized the domestic climate of the time with words sung to the tune of "America the Beautiful":Oh beautiful for Tel & Tel,Du Pont and Sperry Rand,For U.S. Steel and HoneywellAnd Continental Can;American Cyanamid,Three-M and A&PAnd Standard Brands and Ho-Jo standsFrom sea to shining sea!The kicker paid tribute to the man of the hour, whom everyone suspected would be president soon:Americard and Diner's Club,Sears and Montgomery Ward,And Pontiac and CadillacAnd good old Jerry Ford!
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
John C. Ford Jr., who as a young World War II cryptanalyst was part of a team whose work resulted in the shooting down of the bomber carrying Japanese Adm. Isoroku Yamamoto, died Wednesday from respiratory failure at a son's Arnold home. He was 94. The son of an oil salesman and a homemaker, John Cecil Ford Jr. was born in Federal Hill and raised in Catonsville, where he ran track and played lacrosse at Catonsville High School. He graduated from there in 1935. "He was at the Baltimore Business College at the time of Pearl Harbor, and he was about to be drafted into the Army.
BUSINESS
By Tim Swift, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Good morning it's December 7th and, yes, it's still a day that will live in infamy. Seventy-one years later, Pearl Harbor is attracting a fair amount of search traffic on the Internet. Things should pick up photo wise as remembrances get under way in Hawaii later this morning.  We're mostly relying on Twitter today because Google is being a bit stingy this week with the trends. The search giant hasn't updated its hot trends data since Tuesday. I know we all love the Victoria Secret Fashion Show , but I'm thinking America has finally moved on to something else.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | December 6, 2012
I had always wished that my great-grandmother, who lived in Maryland during the Civil War, had written some personal notes as to what it was like for her at the time. They would be especially interesting for us now. With that thought in mind, I wrote some of my memories of World War II for my grandchildren. I attach the article for your review since Dec 7 is today, it puts a human touch on the anniversary date. Some things you never forget, and those of us living with memories of WWII recall with great sadness a quiet Sunday morning, Dec. 7, 1941.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | November 25, 2012
Laurel Park She's All Scat rallies to win Gin Talking Stakes Barry and Joni Butzow 's She's All Scat led to the furlong marker, lost the lead for a few strides, then fought back to win in the $100,000 Gin Talking Stakes for 2-year-old fillies Saturday afternoon at Laurel Park. Jose Caraballo rode the daughter of Scat Daddy for trainer Michael Pino to a clocking of 1 minute, 26.18 seconds for the seven-furlong distance. Ek Haseena , who battled She's All Scat into the deep stretch, lost the win by a length and a half but finished a length and a half ahead of post-time favorite Disco Barbie, who took third.
NEWS
By Henry F. Cooper | September 6, 2012
Recent reports suggest that the U.S. government was likely engaged in two very sophisticated cyber attacks: one that spied on Iran's nuclear program and another that slowed it by destroying centrifuges. These attacks encourage a twinge of national pride in our cyber capabilities. Yet there's a dark corollary to this news. Our enemies can use similarly sophisticated cyber tactics to attack the U.S. government and our private sector. Billions in intellectual property and state secrets are at risk, as well as the critical infrastructure that supports modern American life.
NEWS
July 22, 2012
President Barack Obama reacted a few months ago to a question aboutIran's deliberate efforts to develop a nuclear weapon. His reply and how he was going to prevent it was "all options are on the table. " That's sort of like imagining General George Custer threatening Crazy Horse at the Little Bighorn with, "Surrender! I've got you surrounded!" The only option he failed to include was the upcoming sequestration (read elimination) of $500 billion in defense spending which will begin in earnest next January and will progress into deeper cuts well past 2014.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2012
Myrtle M. Watson, an Army nurse whose indelible memories of the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor remained with her for the rest of her life, died Feb. 11 of vascular disease at Oak Crest Village. The Northeast Baltimore resident was 98. Early in the morning of Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941, Mrs. Watson was busy working her first solo weekend assignment in the orthopedic ward at Schofield Hospital near Pearl Harbor, which was short-staffed because it was a weekend. She began pushing bedridden men out to a second-story lanai so they could take in a barefoot inter-regimental football game that was to be played on the hospital lawn.
NEWS
December 8, 2011
Thanks to Gilbert Sandler ("It still lives in Infamy," Dec. 7) for reminding us of some of the costs of war in his account of Baltimore after Pearl Harbor. What a contrast with today. Our leaders can carry on wars without affecting most of us one bit. No danger, no draft, no rationing, no tax increase, no blackouts. Only if we serve in the armed forces or have a family member there do we suffer anything. We do not even have to pay for the war - we can borrow to cover the cost. It is almost enjoyable and certainly exciting.
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