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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2002
Bertha Caroline Lyles, whose soprano voice and memorable renditions of jazz classics and hymns earned her the sobriquet of the "Song Bird of Sandtown," died Jan. 18 of heart failure at Sinai Hospital. She was 86 and lived in Forest Park. A first-place finish on Major Bowes' Amateur Hour, a national radio show in the early 1930s, helped launch her professional singing career. Traveling the East Coast on what was then called the Chitlin' Circuit, she performed in nightclubs and theaters before black audiences.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2002
Bertha Caroline Lyles, whose soprano voice and memorable renditions of jazz classics and hymns earned her the sobriquet of the "Song Bird of Sandtown," died Jan. 18 of heart failure at Sinai Hospital. She was 86 and lived in Forest Park. A first-place finish on Major Bowes' Amateur Hour, a national radio show in the early 1930s, helped launch her professional singing career. Traveling the East Coast on what was then called the Chitlin' Circuit, she performed in nightclubs and theaters before black audiences.
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NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | February 22, 1994
IF YOU are going to talk about black history in Baltimore, you have got to talk about the Royal Theater. It was located for more than half a century at 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. Sadly, it is no more.From its beginnings in 1920, the biggest names in black (and white, too) entertainment played the Royal. (Black entertainers were usually barred from playing white theaters.) The list of stars included Billie Holiday, Cab Calloway, Pearl Bailey, "Fats" Waller, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Dinah Washington, Nat "King" Cole, Ella Fitzgerald.
FEATURES
By Alan K. Stout and Alan K. Stout,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 11, 2001
He has won nine Grammy Awards and sung for seven U.S. presidents. He has sold more than 50 million records and is described by the Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll as "the epitome of cool." He is also an accomplished painter, and the United Nations has given him a "Citizen of the World" honor. Old folks love him. Young folks love him. Really, everybody loves him. He is, of course, Tony Bennett. And he is, above and beyond his accomplishments, a true gentleman. He speaks respectfully and thoughtfully of music and of other artists.
NEWS
January 18, 1996
Morty Corb, 78, who played bass for Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Pearl Bailey and Nat King Cole, died Saturday of a brain aneurysm in Los Angeles. He began performing professionally at 17 with a San Antonio dance band. After a stint with an Army Air Force band, he moved to Los Angeles in 1946 and soon joined Armstrong's "All Stars" band. He also performed and recorded with Peggy Lee, Pete Fountain, Al Hirt and Jimmy Durante.Margaret Jenkins, 92, who competed in two Olympics, died Jan. 8 in Jackson, Calif.
FEATURES
By Alan K. Stout and Alan K. Stout,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 11, 2001
He has won nine Grammy Awards and sung for seven U.S. presidents. He has sold more than 50 million records and is described by the Rolling Stone Encyclopedia of Rock & Roll as "the epitome of cool." He is also an accomplished painter, and the United Nations has given him a "Citizen of the World" honor. Old folks love him. Young folks love him. Really, everybody loves him. He is, of course, Tony Bennett. And he is, above and beyond his accomplishments, a true gentleman. He speaks respectfully and thoughtfully of music and of other artists.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | February 25, 1997
BALTIMOREANS ARE fickle about restaurants. Survivors are few; among them: Marconi's, (since 1928), House of Welsh (1900), Haussner's (1926), Velleggia's (1934). But history is rich with the memory of restaurants that in their time were a part of who we were and the way we lived.Miller Brothers was on the south side of Fayette Street between Charles and Liberty Street. It seated 450 on one floor, and was famous for green turtle soup and for elk, buffalo and whale steaks. Most people ordered without looking at the menu; it never changed.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | December 27, 1990
WHEN DRUMMER ART BLAKEY died this year, scores of jazz musicians credited him with big chunks of their success. When David Rose died, his "The Stripper" tune and theme for "Bonanza" were remembered. When Eleanor Steber died, sopranos envied her Mozart arias and later teaching skills. When a helicopter crash killed Stevie Ray Vaughan, his Texas blues guitar melodies haunted fans.Musicians are still the influential troubadours of our times and they sing the songs of life to peer and people.
NEWS
December 12, 1993
* Carlotta Monti, 86, an actress whose stormy relationship with W.C. Fields was chronicled in an autobiography and movie, died Wednesday of undisclosed causes in Los Angeles. Miss Monti, the vivacious actress who appeared in such films as "The Merry Widow," the original "Ben Hur" and "One Night of Love," was Mr. Fields' companion from 1933 until his death in 1946. Their relationship was the subject of the 1976 movie "W.C. Fields and Me," starring Rod Steiger as Mr. Fields and Valerie Perrine as Miss Monti.
NEWS
January 30, 2006
On Tuesday, January 24, 2006 SUSAN (nee Bailey) ELINE; beloved daughter of Pearl M. Bailey and the late Lauren Bailey Friends may call at Loring Byers Funeral Directors, Inc., 8728 Liberty Road (2 Miles West of Beltway Exit 18-B) Tuesday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M., where services will be held Wednesday, 10 A.M. Interment, Lorraine Park Cemetery.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | February 25, 1997
BALTIMOREANS ARE fickle about restaurants. Survivors are few; among them: Marconi's, (since 1928), House of Welsh (1900), Haussner's (1926), Velleggia's (1934). But history is rich with the memory of restaurants that in their time were a part of who we were and the way we lived.Miller Brothers was on the south side of Fayette Street between Charles and Liberty Street. It seated 450 on one floor, and was famous for green turtle soup and for elk, buffalo and whale steaks. Most people ordered without looking at the menu; it never changed.
NEWS
January 18, 1996
Morty Corb, 78, who played bass for Louis Armstrong, Ella Fitzgerald, Pearl Bailey and Nat King Cole, died Saturday of a brain aneurysm in Los Angeles. He began performing professionally at 17 with a San Antonio dance band. After a stint with an Army Air Force band, he moved to Los Angeles in 1946 and soon joined Armstrong's "All Stars" band. He also performed and recorded with Peggy Lee, Pete Fountain, Al Hirt and Jimmy Durante.Margaret Jenkins, 92, who competed in two Olympics, died Jan. 8 in Jackson, Calif.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | February 22, 1994
IF YOU are going to talk about black history in Baltimore, you have got to talk about the Royal Theater. It was located for more than half a century at 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. Sadly, it is no more.From its beginnings in 1920, the biggest names in black (and white, too) entertainment played the Royal. (Black entertainers were usually barred from playing white theaters.) The list of stars included Billie Holiday, Cab Calloway, Pearl Bailey, "Fats" Waller, Duke Ellington, Louis Armstrong, Dinah Washington, Nat "King" Cole, Ella Fitzgerald.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | December 27, 1990
WHEN DRUMMER ART BLAKEY died this year, scores of jazz musicians credited him with big chunks of their success. When David Rose died, his "The Stripper" tune and theme for "Bonanza" were remembered. When Eleanor Steber died, sopranos envied her Mozart arias and later teaching skills. When a helicopter crash killed Stevie Ray Vaughan, his Texas blues guitar melodies haunted fans.Musicians are still the influential troubadours of our times and they sing the songs of life to peer and people.
NEWS
February 18, 2009
SIR BERNARD ASHLEY, 82 Co-founder of Laura Ashley brand Sir Bernard Ashley, who teamed up with his wife to build the Laura Ashley fashion and home furnishing brand into a global business, died Saturday at his home in the Elan Valley in Wales, his family said Monday. The cause of death was not announced. Sir Bernard had the business acumen that propelled his wife's flair for nostalgic designs into a thriving business. He married Laura Mountney in 1949. Inspired by a trip to Italy in 1953, she designed some head scarves.
NEWS
May 18, 1997
Joanie Weston,62, a strapping power hitter who passed up a promising, respectable future in softball to become the gum-chewing, power-skating, hip-bumping golden girl of Roller Derby, died of a brain disorder May 10 at her home near San Francisco.Thelma Carpenter,77, whose long roller-coaster career as a singer took her to the heights with the big bands of the 1930s and 1940s, out of show business into years as a file clerk and back to the big-time on Broadway in the title role of "Hello, Dolly!
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