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Lorraine Mirabella | August 28, 2013
Giant Food is expanding store pick-up sites for consumers who shop through online grocer Peapod. The Landover-based supermarket chain said this week it has added supermarkets in Bowie and in Sterling, Va., to a growing list of stores where Peapod orders can be delivered. In just the last four months, Giant has added pick-up locations to 20 stores in Maryland and Virginia. The retailer also recently opened a pick-up and fuel station facility in Chevy Chase.  "We're very excited to be working with our sister grocer Peapod so closely to execute our Giant Pick-up program - an excellent convenience for customers in the mid-Atlantic region," Anthony Hucker, Giant's president, said in the announcement.
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BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | August 28, 2013
Giant Food is expanding store pick-up sites for consumers who shop through online grocer Peapod. The Landover-based supermarket chain said this week it has added supermarkets in Bowie and in Sterling, Va., to a growing list of stores where Peapod orders can be delivered. In just the last four months, Giant has added pick-up locations to 20 stores in Maryland and Virginia. The retailer also recently opened a pick-up and fuel station facility in Chevy Chase.  "We're very excited to be working with our sister grocer Peapod so closely to execute our Giant Pick-up program - an excellent convenience for customers in the mid-Atlantic region," Anthony Hucker, Giant's president, said in the announcement.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2001
Dutch food retailer Royal Ahold NV, which owns more than half of Internet grocer Peapod Inc., said yesterday that it has offered $35 million for the rest of the online company. Chicago-based Peapod accepted Ahold's cash offer of $2.15 per share yesterday for the 42 percent of Peapod stock it doesn't already own. The price represents a 72 percent premium over the closing price of Peapod's shares on Friday. Shares of Peapod soared yesterday, gaining $1.20 to close at $2.50, on the news, which came less than a week after two of Peapod's major rivals, Webvan and Home- runs.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2012
Online grocer Relay Foods of Charlottesville, Va., is rolling out service Tuesday in Baltimore, Washington and Philadelphia and plans to offer groceries from local suppliers and farms through home delivery and, eventually, at pick-up sites. Relay, which until now has operated only in the Charlottesville and Richmond markets, sees untapped demand in Baltimore, Zach Buckner, Relay's CEO, said Monday. The company is expanding thanks to its June acquisition of Washington-based Arganica Farm Club, an online farmers' market now serving Baltimore, Washington and Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2000
Online grocer Peapod Inc. announced an acquisition yesterday that will allow it to move into the Baltimore-Washington region and join with Giant Food Inc. to bring online grocery ordering and home delivery to shoppers. Peapod, which is 51 percent-owned by Giant's parent, Royal Ahold NV, said it has acquired the Gaithersburg and Chicago operations of Streamline.com Inc., a Massachusetts-based online shopping and delivery service, for $12 million. Streamline will continue operating in Boston and New Jersey.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1993
Tribune Co. buys Peapod stakeTribune Co., publisher of the Chicago Tribune and six other daily newspapers, said it made a minority equity investment in privately held Peapod, an on-line home shopping services company.@
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2004
How does ordering from Peapod stack up against shopping at your local Giant store? If you're willing to pay a bit more - not only for delivery, but for some products - having groceries appear in your kitchen can feel like a busy person's dream come true. But if you want to pay the lowest price for everything and if you'd miss the chance to watch the human comedy, you might prefer the store. We decided to compare the two shopping methods by scheduling a Peapod delivery for a recent Saturday morning.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2004
Alyson Nachman's boys couldn't wait for the man in the green and white grocery truck to pull up to their Owings Mills house - and neither could she. Among the first in the Baltimore area to order her groceries over the Internet from a company called Peapod by Giant, Nachman stood by as the driver brought red peppers, milk and other everyday supplies to her kitchen counter. Instead of tearing through the aisles of a local Giant, sons Jason, 4, and Alex, 2, quietly ogled the truck and the neat green totes full of groceries.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2004
Julie Mitchell considers grocery shopping one of life's worst chores. So five years ago, the Alexandria, Va., mother of two began letting somebody else do it for her. Mitchell, 36, orders her groceries by computer from online grocer Peapod LLC and avoids crowds, long lines and having to lug heavy bags from the car. "I can do a week's worth of shopping in 15 minutes and have them delivered in a day," said Mitchell, who shopped so much by computer that...
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2012
Online grocer Relay Foods of Charlottesville, Va., is rolling out service Tuesday in Baltimore, Washington and Philadelphia and plans to offer groceries from local suppliers and farms through home delivery and, eventually, at pick-up sites. Relay, which until now has operated only in the Charlottesville and Richmond markets, sees untapped demand in Baltimore, Zach Buckner, Relay's CEO, said Monday. The company is expanding thanks to its June acquisition of Washington-based Arganica Farm Club, an online farmers' market now serving Baltimore, Washington and Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2012
Plenty of shoppers at a Baltimore Safeway have started checking their cell phones while pushing carts and scanning shelves. They may have been texting or checking Facebook updates, but now grocery customers could use mobile devices to plan meals, organize lists, download coupons, compare prices, check rewards points, get personalized sale offers and scan bar codes Mobile technology is the latest front opened by a growing number of supermarket chains...
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2011
FreshDirect Inc., an online grocer looking to expand beyond its New York City base, might bring its service to Baltimore. The company, based in Long Island City, N.Y., has targeted several cities, among them Baltimore, Washington, Philadelphia and Boston, but has not said when or where any new service would start, according to a spokeswoman. "Baltimore is definitely an area that they are looking at for the expansion," she said. FreshDirect CEO Richard S. Braddock, former CEO of online travel company Priceline.com, has said the company would raise money for an expansion.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2004
Alyson Nachman's boys couldn't wait for the man in the green and white grocery truck to pull up to their Owings Mills house - and neither could she. Among the first in the Baltimore area to order her groceries over the Internet from a company called Peapod by Giant, Nachman stood by as the driver brought red peppers, milk and other everyday supplies to her kitchen counter. Instead of tearing through the aisles of a local Giant, sons Jason, 4, and Alex, 2, quietly ogled the truck and the neat green totes full of groceries.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2004
How does ordering from Peapod stack up against shopping at your local Giant store? If you're willing to pay a bit more - not only for delivery, but for some products - having groceries appear in your kitchen can feel like a busy person's dream come true. But if you want to pay the lowest price for everything and if you'd miss the chance to watch the human comedy, you might prefer the store. We decided to compare the two shopping methods by scheduling a Peapod delivery for a recent Saturday morning.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2004
Julie Mitchell considers grocery shopping one of life's worst chores. So five years ago, the Alexandria, Va., mother of two began letting somebody else do it for her. Mitchell, 36, orders her groceries by computer from online grocer Peapod LLC and avoids crowds, long lines and having to lug heavy bags from the car. "I can do a week's worth of shopping in 15 minutes and have them delivered in a day," said Mitchell, who shopped so much by computer that...
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2001
Dutch food retailer Royal Ahold NV, which owns more than half of Internet grocer Peapod Inc., said yesterday that it has offered $35 million for the rest of the online company. Chicago-based Peapod accepted Ahold's cash offer of $2.15 per share yesterday for the 42 percent of Peapod stock it doesn't already own. The price represents a 72 percent premium over the closing price of Peapod's shares on Friday. Shares of Peapod soared yesterday, gaining $1.20 to close at $2.50, on the news, which came less than a week after two of Peapod's major rivals, Webvan and Home- runs.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2012
Plenty of shoppers at a Baltimore Safeway have started checking their cell phones while pushing carts and scanning shelves. They may have been texting or checking Facebook updates, but now grocery customers could use mobile devices to plan meals, organize lists, download coupons, compare prices, check rewards points, get personalized sale offers and scan bar codes Mobile technology is the latest front opened by a growing number of supermarket chains...
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2011
FreshDirect Inc., an online grocer looking to expand beyond its New York City base, might bring its service to Baltimore. The company, based in Long Island City, N.Y., has targeted several cities, among them Baltimore, Washington, Philadelphia and Boston, but has not said when or where any new service would start, according to a spokeswoman. "Baltimore is definitely an area that they are looking at for the expansion," she said. FreshDirect CEO Richard S. Braddock, former CEO of online travel company Priceline.com, has said the company would raise money for an expansion.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | September 8, 2000
Online grocer Peapod Inc. announced an acquisition yesterday that will allow it to move into the Baltimore-Washington region and join with Giant Food Inc. to bring online grocery ordering and home delivery to shoppers. Peapod, which is 51 percent-owned by Giant's parent, Royal Ahold NV, said it has acquired the Gaithersburg and Chicago operations of Streamline.com Inc., a Massachusetts-based online shopping and delivery service, for $12 million. Streamline will continue operating in Boston and New Jersey.
BUSINESS
August 20, 1993
Tribune Co. buys Peapod stakeTribune Co., publisher of the Chicago Tribune and six other daily newspapers, said it made a minority equity investment in privately held Peapod, an on-line home shopping services company.@
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