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NEWS
December 10, 2006
`Peanuts' -- Howard Community Colleges Student-Alumni Arts will present its version of the musical You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown (based on the Charles M. Schulz comic strip, Peanuts) at 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, and at 3 p.m. Sundays through Dec. 17 at the college's new black box theater in the Peter and Elizabeth Horowitz Visual and Performing Arts Center. The show is recommended for ages 3 and older. Tickets are $15; $12 for senior citizens and groups; and $10 for students with identification.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | August 14, 2014
Inner city kids appear to suffer more from food allergies than the general population, according to new research lead by Johns Hopkins Children's Center . Researchers had already found that kids in four large cities are more vulnerable to asthma and environmental allergies. The new findings, which were published in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology , show 10 percent of the kids were allergic to milk, eggs or peanuts, the three most common food allergens. Just six percent of kids nationally are allergic to these foods, according to National Institute of Health estimates.
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FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | January 17, 1993
Baltimore-based artist Tom Everhart will be featured in a CBS-TV show to air this winter (date to be announced). The Charles Schulz special, titled "Those Fabulous Funnies: The First 100 Years," will include a segment on Everhart, who paints "Peanuts" contemporary portraits.Everhart's relationship with "Peanuts" creator Schulz began 11 years ago when Everhart was a free-lance artist working for Disney. They hit it off so well that Schulz taught him his techniques and eventually hired Everhart to work on special projects for him. Everhart says the most exciting project he's worked on for Schulz so far was a Time magazine cover.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
As crowds poured into Pimlico on Saturday afternoon, a dedicated crew of entrepreneurs set up outside the track, hoping to lure customers with deals on parking or tickets. Peanuts, barbecue and even jewelry were on sale, along with the "ice cold" bottled water offered for a dollar by enterprising vendors at every major event in Baltimore. Carlton Graham, 39, waved a large cardboard sign at passing cars advertising $25 parking just a block from the track. Graham, who said he's been a Park Heights resident his whole life, has worked with neighbors selling race-day parking spaces in yards and driveways.
NEWS
January 12, 1993
Bread-and-butter issues as well as peanuts are on the plate of Baltimore City's legislative delegation in Annapolis as the General Assembly convenes tomorrow.Among the peanuts are technical changes in the law that would prohibit the carrying of rifles and shotguns in the city (yes, according to the law, that's legal!) and authorize civilian traffic enforcement officers to issue penalties to violators. Today, it seems, many motorists obey them without quite realizing those officers, despite their uniforms, are about as powerful as scarecrows!
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | December 19, 1990
Now here's a poser of a trivia question, prompted by tonight's re-airing of the classic "A Charlie Brown Christmas" (at 8:30, Channel 11): Who was president of the United States when this animated holiday treat first was seen on television?Lyndon Baines Johnson, that's who, for this show premiered Dec. 9, 1965, as the initial animated adaptation of the "Peanuts" comic strip gang. Makes you feel old, right? But did you know the round-headed kid was already pretty old himself by the time he reached the tube?
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | March 28, 1991
A Jessup factory has started producing a new kind of whit packaging "peanut" that dissolves in water, can be composted into fertilizer and can even be eaten, though the makers don't recommend them as a dining experience.Art Buckingham, Maryland branch manager for American Excelsior Co., said yesterday that the corn starch-based "Eco-Foam" pellets are an alternative to standard white polystyrene foam "peanuts." The company, based in Arlington, Texas, is one of the nation's biggest producers of plastic packaging materials, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | September 13, 1991
The Midtown Yacht Club is something of a misnomer, because it has nothing to do with yachting and is not a club. It is located in midtown Baltimore, though, so one out of three ain't bad.Having been anchored on East Centre Street for nine years now, this agreeable pub has had plenty of time to gain a loyal following. These regulars know the pub's logo of an upside down sailboat is a smiling reminder that the nautical theme isn't taken very seriously here.They also know that there's a whole lotta crunching going on here -- not just food between the teeth, but discarded peanut shells underfoot.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | June 16, 1992
Charles M. Schulz's "Peanuts" gang was everywhere in the 1960s, as you baby boomers might recall.Charlie Brown, Snoopy, Lucy, Linus, Schroeder and the rest frequently turned up on greeting cards, sweat shirts, commercials, lunch boxes, TV specials and feature films, as well as in books, rock songs, ("Snoopy Versus the Red Baron" by The Royal Guardsmen, remember?) and even a fascinating published dissertation from the University of Chicago School of Divinity entitled "The Gospel According to Peanuts."
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2005
Sometimes the members of the Old Otterbein United Methodist Church can't help but talk about divine intervention. Somehow a gleaming new ballpark - Oriole Park at Camden Yards - was plopped down at the end of the street where the church has stood since 1785. Somehow a member named Edith Parthree thought to bring little bags of peanuts to sell at, of all things, a strawberry festival nearly 13 years ago. And when they didn't sell, a few guys from the church somehow thought they could earn a few bucks if they took a shot at the folks streaming by outside on the way to that day's baseball game.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
Orioles reliever Brian Matusz remembers laughing when he opened the piece of fan mail in Sarasota, Fla., last month. He immediately showed the contents of the manila envelope to Orioles head athletic trainer Richie Bancells before informing manager Buck Showalter. "I'm like, Richie, can you believe this?' Then I told Buck about it," Matusz said recently, chuckling. "That's probably the most unusual, interesting item any fan has ever asked me to sign. I thought it was hilarious.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Andrew Conrad, aconrad@tribune.com | December 1, 2013
Whoa! There is a ton of heavy stuff to discuss from Sunday night's midseason finale of "The Walking Dead" on AMC, but first, a serious question: Is the Governor really dead? I know that we saw him get stabbed through the center of the back and chest with Michonne's Shinobi sword, and then we saw Lilly stand over him and fire her gun in the direction of his head. But we never actually saw him die. I've learned that in shows like these - "The Walking Dead", " Magnum, P.I. ", " Legends of the Hidden Temple " - that a character isn't actually dead and gone until we see their rotten, decomposing carcass.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | January 24, 2013
In the early 1980s, transit officials in Washington couldn't figure out why traffic on the Beltway would grind to a near halt every day around the exact same time. The usual explanations didn't fit. Then it was discovered that a single driver was to blame. Every day on his drive to work, this commuter would plant himself in the left lane and set his cruise control to 55 mph, the posted speed limit, forcing those behind him to merge right, and you can imagine the effects. To his credit, this driver came forward in a letter to the editor of The Washington Post.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | October 12, 2012
Ice cream and granola bars are the latest products to be linked to widespread manufacturer recalls of some peanut butters and other nut products that started last month. In the past week, at least five manufacturers have recalled peanut butter flavored ice cream products. In each case, the peanut butter used in the product was supplied either directly or indirectly by Sunland Inc., which has issued a national recall of some of its products because of possible Salmonella contamination.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | September 24, 2012
Two additional nut butter products have been added to a list of Trader Joe's products consumers should not eat because they have been linked to a Salmonella outbreak. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene advised consumers Friday not to consume or purchase Trader Joe's brand Valencia Creamy Salted Peanut Butter made with sea salt, manufactured by Sunland Inc. Monday Sunland also  voluntarily recalled Trader Joe's Valencia Peanut Butter with Roasted Flaxseeds, Crunchy and Salted and Trader Joe's Almond Butter with Roasted Flaxseeds, Crunchy & Salted.  The outbreak has sickened 29 people in 18 states, including a child in Maryland who was not hospitalized and has recovered.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | August 31, 2012
Baltimore, you should root hard for Oriol Servia in Sunday's big Grand Prix race. For one thing, the guy's name means oriole in Spanish. "Right?" he says. "It's a natural!" And the 38-year-old Spaniard has totally embraced his connection to this town and its baseball team since finishing second to Australia's Will Power in last year's race. Servia even has two orioles painted on each side of his racing helmet next to a surreal image of the great Salvador Dali, his countryman.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2000
For nearly a half-century, the world of "Peanuts" hasn't changed much: Charlie Brown's kites are forever eaten by trees; Lucy always yanks the football away at the last second; and Snoopy never stops cursing the Red Baron. Sadly, in the real world, nothing lasts forever. No one, either. Saturday evening, as about 2,600 newspapers worldwide were preparing to publish his final original comic strip, "Peanuts" creator Charles M. Schulz died in his sleep of a heart attack at his Santa Rosa, Calif.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | April 6, 1994
Mr. Max Nolan Powers has such a perfectly dignified way of telling this story -- and, it's my suspicion, of conducting himself generally -- that one soon forgets the man is talking about hawking peanuts."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2012
Van Gogh Vodka is introducing what it's calling one of their most innovative and unexpected flavors to date: PB&J. The press release from Van Gogh was spread thick with all kinds of tasty trivia about the beloved sandwich. It says that peanut butter was invented by a doctor in St. Louis for his toothless patients. Van Gogh's PB&J has a primarily peanut fragrance complemented by the aroma of fresh raspberries. But, the profiles reverse on the tongue. Raspberry dominates the flavor, not peanut butter.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
Take me out to the ball game, Take me out with the crowd. Buy me some peanuts and cracker jack, I don't care if I never get back. Peanuts are an iconic part of the baseball experience. But if you have allergies -- like so many people do -- all those shells and bits can make a trip to the ballpark uncomfortable, if not downright dangerous. So the Orioles this year will again join some other major league ballparks in creating peanut-free zones. For certain games, Oriole Park at Camden Yards will set aside a "peanut allergy suite.
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