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Peanut Sauce

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NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 11, 2004
Sometimes the simplest dishes raise the most fuss. So it is with cold sesame noodles. For years I toiled without success to find just the right zing, only to find the answer not in pricey tahini (sesame-seed pastes) but in plain old peanut butter. Admittedly, the peanut butter in question wasn't Skippy or Jif. Rather it was a high-quality, all-natural product. And it was jazzed up by the late Barbara Tropp, a San Francisco author and restaurateur, with plenty of raw garlic, sugar and hot red chile paste.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
From ramen to pho, noodles are not new, but they are definitely trendy. At Noodle Charm, a Towson spot that opened in July, the focus is on Thai-style street food. Noodle Charm's bowls of noodles, vegetables, protein and broth, flavored with traditional Thai spices and condiments, are not fancy. But they do satisfy, making Noodle Charm a welcome addition to the Towson dining landscape. Scene & Decor Noodle Charm is in an office park but it's cuter than that sounds. The owners did what they could with the location, painting the walls a bright, warm yellow and adding patterns and art all over the place.
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NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | February 6, 2008
Thai peanut sauce and coconut milk add an intriguing flavor to tilapia. For this recipe, they are simmered to gently coat the fish. Peanut sauce is the base for many Thai dishes and is made from roasted peanuts, soy sauce and spices. I choose a thick one when it is available. Coconut milk is made by mixing shredded coconut with boiling water, letting it steep and then straining it. Fortunately, both peanut sauce and coconut milk are available ready-made. Serve this dish with basmati rice.
NEWS
By Linda Gassenheimer and Linda Gassenheimer,McClatchy-Tribune | February 6, 2008
Thai peanut sauce and coconut milk add an intriguing flavor to tilapia. For this recipe, they are simmered to gently coat the fish. Peanut sauce is the base for many Thai dishes and is made from roasted peanuts, soy sauce and spices. I choose a thick one when it is available. Coconut milk is made by mixing shredded coconut with boiling water, letting it steep and then straining it. Fortunately, both peanut sauce and coconut milk are available ready-made. Serve this dish with basmati rice.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2003
Arecent survey by an international market research firm found that Americans are giving up their skillets. Ten years ago, virtually every home had a frying pan, but in 2002, the number had dropped to 92 percent. With ready-made foods, microwaves and grills, who needs a frying pan? Well, don't toss your skillet in the trash just yet. Bon Appetit columnists Brooke Dojny and Melanie Barnard offer proof that the lowly frying pan might be the most important utensil in your kitchen. In A Flash in the Pan (Chronicle Books, 2003, $22.95)
FEATURES
By Steven Pratt and Steven Pratt,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 10, 1996
When you cook up a pot of something to take to a summer picnic or party, you'll be part of a great American tradition. Since the time of the pioneers, when neighbors gathered to build barns, bring in the harvest, celebrate a wedding or console the bereaved, people have brought dishes to share.War shortages and the Great Depression compelled Americans to exchange what few victuals they had. Later, in the 1940s and '50s, church and school suppers -- where attendees brought food and took "potluck" with each others' concoctions -- were weekly occurrences in some towns.
FEATURES
By Beth Hillson and Beth Hillson,Contributing Writer | December 9, 1992
This kid version of a popular dish called "sesame noodles" can be part of a meal or a meal in itself. Just add pieces of cooked chicken, steak, or vegetables. It's also a great way to use up leftovers -- even leftover noodles. Serve with peanut sauce hot, cold, or in between.Kids over 11 can make this recipe without help. Be sure to get an adult's permission first, then follow the safety tips below for boiling pasta. Younger chefs can make the sauce by themselves. Remember to use pot holders to remove the sauce from the microwave after cooking.
NEWS
By ROBIN MATHER JENKINS | December 14, 2005
Something about skewers just says casual. Combine casual with chicken - especially boneless, skinless chicken breasts - and dinner is guaranteed to be quick and easy. This skewered chicken gives a nod to more traditional grilled Indonesian chicken satay. But because we want dinner on the table fast, we've got no time to marinate before we cook. Instead, rub the chicken with a simple spice rub to add one layer of flavor, then season its dipping sauce more highly than usual. If you've got time, you can certainly grill these.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 12, 1994
The other night my wife and I arrived home from work late, tired and beaten. The kids were hungry, tussling with each other and demanding help with homework. It was a chicken-in-peanut-sauce night.Chicken in peanut sauce is one of our fallback meals. It is not "quick and easy," as so many dishes claim to be. It requires some effort and a fair amount of organization. But it has a big payoff, it tastes good.The first time you make it, it will take an experienced cook about an hour. But once you know what you are doing and have your ingredients ready to go, you can have supper on the table in 30 minutes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 4, 1994
Everything's a trade-off. You know the food might not be as good at your neighborhood Chinese carryout as at a full-fledged restaurant, but it's going to cost you half as much. (Feel free to prove me wrong by sending me the names of carryouts with superb food.)I expected the same to be true of Thairish, a tiny Thai carryout/eatery. To some extent it is -- if you compare Thairish to the best of Baltimore's Thai restaurants. But for inexpensive carryout food, this is as good as you're going to get.The menu is quite simple, with such dishes as pad thai, three kinds of red curry (hot, hotter, hottest)
NEWS
By ROBIN MATHER JENKINS | December 14, 2005
Something about skewers just says casual. Combine casual with chicken - especially boneless, skinless chicken breasts - and dinner is guaranteed to be quick and easy. This skewered chicken gives a nod to more traditional grilled Indonesian chicken satay. But because we want dinner on the table fast, we've got no time to marinate before we cook. Instead, rub the chicken with a simple spice rub to add one layer of flavor, then season its dipping sauce more highly than usual. If you've got time, you can certainly grill these.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 11, 2004
Sometimes the simplest dishes raise the most fuss. So it is with cold sesame noodles. For years I toiled without success to find just the right zing, only to find the answer not in pricey tahini (sesame-seed pastes) but in plain old peanut butter. Admittedly, the peanut butter in question wasn't Skippy or Jif. Rather it was a high-quality, all-natural product. And it was jazzed up by the late Barbara Tropp, a San Francisco author and restaurateur, with plenty of raw garlic, sugar and hot red chile paste.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | July 9, 2003
Arecent survey by an international market research firm found that Americans are giving up their skillets. Ten years ago, virtually every home had a frying pan, but in 2002, the number had dropped to 92 percent. With ready-made foods, microwaves and grills, who needs a frying pan? Well, don't toss your skillet in the trash just yet. Bon Appetit columnists Brooke Dojny and Melanie Barnard offer proof that the lowly frying pan might be the most important utensil in your kitchen. In A Flash in the Pan (Chronicle Books, 2003, $22.95)
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and By Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | December 8, 2002
The Luna-C Grille has almost everything a post-millennium restaurant needs. It has a bistro feel. It's the kind of place where you can have dinner in your yogawear after working out at the nearby Columbia Gym. It's pretty good at being all things to all people, so you can bring your kids or have an intimate dinner for two -- and not feel out of place in either case. The menu ranges from sandwiches and salads to full-scale dinners. On the night we were there, a jazz trio played soft music to soothe harried customers.
NEWS
By SUSAN NICHOLSON and SUSAN NICHOLSON,Universal Press Syndicate | April 30, 2000
This week's menus Each day of the week offers a menu aimed at a different aspect of meal planning. There's a family meal, a kids' menu aimed at younger tastes, a heat-and-eat meal that recycles leftovers, a budget meal that employs a cost- cutting strategy, a meatless or "less meat" dish for people who may not be strict vegetarians but are trying to cut down on meat, an express meal that requires little or no preparation, and an entertaining menu that's...
NEWS
By Kathryn Higham and Kathryn Higham,Special to the Sun | July 25, 1999
Few Chinese restaurants in town have as grand an appearance as Tony Cheng's, located in a stately mansion on Charles Street. Walk through the round archway to the spacious back dining room, and you'll find tables dressed in pink tablecloths and bright-red exotic blooms.Waterfowl are worked in tapestry on banquettes and etched in glass between wood-trimmed booths. Shirred fabric lines a curved wall, an effect elegant enough for the White House. Aside from the out-of-place Christmas decorations, it's a room that raises expectations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | August 20, 1993
For most people I know, Thai food is not an acquired taste. If they've been brought up with American-Chinese restaurant food, they make the transition easily -- and often feel that Thai cuisine is subtler and lighter. And hotter, of course, but that can be adjusted to suit youor taste.It's no wonder that other Thai eating places sprang up all over the city once the Thai Restaurant opened in Waverly a few years back and did very well. But now there are so many it's going to be tough for the new Ban Thai to survive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2013
From ramen to pho, noodles are not new, but they are definitely trendy. At Noodle Charm, a Towson spot that opened in July, the focus is on Thai-style street food. Noodle Charm's bowls of noodles, vegetables, protein and broth, flavored with traditional Thai spices and condiments, are not fancy. But they do satisfy, making Noodle Charm a welcome addition to the Towson dining landscape. Scene & Decor Noodle Charm is in an office park but it's cuter than that sounds. The owners did what they could with the location, painting the walls a bright, warm yellow and adding patterns and art all over the place.
FEATURES
By Steven Pratt and Steven Pratt,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 10, 1996
When you cook up a pot of something to take to a summer picnic or party, you'll be part of a great American tradition. Since the time of the pioneers, when neighbors gathered to build barns, bring in the harvest, celebrate a wedding or console the bereaved, people have brought dishes to share.War shortages and the Great Depression compelled Americans to exchange what few victuals they had. Later, in the 1940s and '50s, church and school suppers -- where attendees brought food and took "potluck" with each others' concoctions -- were weekly occurrences in some towns.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | March 4, 1994
Everything's a trade-off. You know the food might not be as good at your neighborhood Chinese carryout as at a full-fledged restaurant, but it's going to cost you half as much. (Feel free to prove me wrong by sending me the names of carryouts with superb food.)I expected the same to be true of Thairish, a tiny Thai carryout/eatery. To some extent it is -- if you compare Thairish to the best of Baltimore's Thai restaurants. But for inexpensive carryout food, this is as good as you're going to get.The menu is quite simple, with such dishes as pad thai, three kinds of red curry (hot, hotter, hottest)
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