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By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1995
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- No Breeders' Cup for Concern.That was the sentiment of trainer Dick Small last night after the champion Maryland-bred colt finished third, 4 1/2 lengths behind the winning Peaks And Valleys, in the $500,000 Meadowlands Cup at The Meadowlands racetrack.Jockey Julie Krone hugged the rail with Peaks And Valleys, the lone 3-year-old in the 1 1/8 -mile stakes, and opened a commanding lead after passing pace-setting Poor But Honest at the top of the stretch. Poor But Honest held on for second, two lengths in front of Concern, whose customary late rally fell short.
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September 10, 2012
Defenses will adjust Aaron Wilson Baltimore Sun It was a masterful debut for Redskins rookie quarterback Robert Griffin III, practically perfect as he outdueled Drew Brees. So, what's next for the dynamic rookie? Defenses will make some adjustments to try to curtail his impact. They'll study his tendencies to find a hole in his game, if one even exists. Once there's a larger body of work of Griffin III, someone will devise a way to at least contain him. Remember, there are better defenses out there than the suspect Saints.
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SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 26, 2006
Our Peak, a 73-1 long shot with Rosie Napravnik up, charged down the middle of the racetrack to nip Ah Day in the shadow of the finish line and win the $85,000 Private Terms Stakes yesterday at Laurel Park. Napravnik, an 18-year-old apprentice, won her first stakes race last weekend aboard Reckless Ways. Her star continues to ascend as she brought the son of Peaks And Valleys home in 1 minute, 38.66 seconds in the one-mile Private Terms. Katy Voss trains Our Peak, a winner of just a maiden race and an allowance start, both at nearby Charles Town.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
MINNEAPOLIS - Orioles manager Buck Showalter calls the month following the All-Star break the true dog days of summer. It's the critical time of the baseball season when the game is a matter of survival through injuries and fatigue, the time when contenders distance themselves from pretenders. And these Orioles, far from seasoned when it comes to playing meaningful games in the second half, have struggled through it. Showalter often talks about riding through the peaks and valleys of a 162-game schedule and doing everything possible to extend the peaks and shorten the valleys.
SPORTS
September 10, 2012
Defenses will adjust Aaron Wilson Baltimore Sun It was a masterful debut for Redskins rookie quarterback Robert Griffin III, practically perfect as he outdueled Drew Brees. So, what's next for the dynamic rookie? Defenses will make some adjustments to try to curtail his impact. They'll study his tendencies to find a hole in his game, if one even exists. Once there's a larger body of work of Griffin III, someone will devise a way to at least contain him. Remember, there are better defenses out there than the suspect Saints.
NEWS
By Patricia Meisol | July 25, 1991
They started as partners in a quest to solve the riddle of deadly diseases, and they became enemies in a contest over wiggly lines. In the pitch of battle, there were papers pulled at the last minute from scientific journals, anonymous tips, allegations of stolen data in the halls of the School of Pharmacy and ugly confrontations at annual scientific meetings.It might be absurd, except that now the reputations of two strong-willed scientists hang in the balance. Pitted against each other are a young researcher, Carmen M. Arroyo, and the head of her former lab at the University of Maryland at Baltimore, Gerald M. Rosen, in a case that goes to the heart of science: honesty in published research.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | May 9, 2012
On the heels of one of the most uplifting road trips in recent memory, the Orioles suddenly find themselves at their first critical juncture of the young season, but here's the reason that it might not suck all the wind out of their terrific start: For once, they weren't blindsided by it. Two bullpen-busting marathons in Boston forced the front office to make a series of roster moves this week, and the struggles of starters Tommy Hunter, Brian...
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2010
Orioles first baseman Rhyne Hughes had four hits in his first nine major league at-bats, a strong first impression even if it hadn't come against the Boston Red Sox. But since those two days in late April at Fenway Park, Hughes found hits harder to come by, and he learned following Saturday night's game that he had been sent down to Triple-A Norfolk. The Orioles will announce a corresponding move Sunday, but it is expected that they'll call up a reliever and go with an eight-man bullpen in the time being.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2012
MINNEAPOLIS - Orioles manager Buck Showalter calls the month following the All-Star break the true dog days of summer. It's the critical time of the baseball season when the game is a matter of survival through injuries and fatigue, the time when contenders distance themselves from pretenders. And these Orioles, far from seasoned when it comes to playing meaningful games in the second half, have struggled through it. Showalter often talks about riding through the peaks and valleys of a 162-game schedule and doing everything possible to extend the peaks and shorten the valleys.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,Special to The Sun | November 22, 1994
Pro Musica Rara opened its 20th season at the Baltimore Museum of Art Sunday afternoon with the "Steps to Parnassus." Parnassus is the mountain in Greece associated with Apollo; unfortunately, Pro Musica Rara was not always at the peak.The collection of solo sonatas, trio sonatas, and solo suite were all masterworks, but the musical results were a little uneven.The program opened with the first of the "Mystery" sonatas of Heinrich Ignaz von Biber. Violinist Cynthia Roberts played with sensitivity and gave the music its melancholic flavor.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | May 9, 2012
On the heels of one of the most uplifting road trips in recent memory, the Orioles suddenly find themselves at their first critical juncture of the young season, but here's the reason that it might not suck all the wind out of their terrific start: For once, they weren't blindsided by it. Two bullpen-busting marathons in Boston forced the front office to make a series of roster moves this week, and the struggles of starters Tommy Hunter, Brian...
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2010
Orioles first baseman Rhyne Hughes had four hits in his first nine major league at-bats, a strong first impression even if it hadn't come against the Boston Red Sox. But since those two days in late April at Fenway Park, Hughes found hits harder to come by, and he learned following Saturday night's game that he had been sent down to Triple-A Norfolk. The Orioles will announce a corresponding move Sunday, but it is expected that they'll call up a reliever and go with an eight-man bullpen in the time being.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 26, 2006
Our Peak, a 73-1 long shot with Rosie Napravnik up, charged down the middle of the racetrack to nip Ah Day in the shadow of the finish line and win the $85,000 Private Terms Stakes yesterday at Laurel Park. Napravnik, an 18-year-old apprentice, won her first stakes race last weekend aboard Reckless Ways. Her star continues to ascend as she brought the son of Peaks And Valleys home in 1 minute, 38.66 seconds in the one-mile Private Terms. Katy Voss trains Our Peak, a winner of just a maiden race and an allowance start, both at nearby Charles Town.
NEWS
By Mark Reutter and Mark Reutter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 2002
Eleven years ago, steelworker Brian Zoccole drove along U.S. 62 on the western slope of Pennsylvania. The highway bisected Shenango Valley on a high bridge, revealing the typical town and mill below. To the north was the town of Sharon, named after the biblical plains of Palestine, and on the south were rows of liver-red sheds. Once home to the nation's finest specialty steel products, the sprawling mill was smokeless and silent. The rust spread out from the mill, past junk-strewn lots to a crisis food center and unemployment office.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | October 24, 1999
It always surprises me that Columbia doesn't have more nice restaurants. (I'm not counting chains.) There's a huge, affluent and fairly sophisticated customer base there. Who knows? Maybe that's why Piccolo's was packed on a Wednesday night.Or maybe it was the return of chef Michael Wagner, who was in charge of Piccolo's kitchen for three years, developed a following and then left to open Planet Hollywood. He moved on to the Tomato Palace in Columbia and is now back at Piccolo's, with a new menu of contemporary Italian cuisine.
FEATURES
By LINELL SMITH and LINELL SMITH,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1999
How Chester Wickwire feels about the first book of poetry he's published would take at least one more poem to reveal. "Longs Peak" contains 39 graceful pieces, hard-worked, heart-felt, truly lived. And its publication has just welcomed the young poet into his 85th year.The volume is a new twist in a career that has provided little time for reflection. It's an autobiographical record of the rewards and regrets of living life full throttle, from the gun-toting streets of Colorado City in the '20s to the white marble stoops of Baltimore today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | November 27, 1992
Nefeli Massia's landscape paintings appear to be made in a non-traditional way, but the result is nevertheless a form of landscape, if a subjective and expressionist one.These works look as if they were made to a considerable degree by causing the materials (the artist uses a combination of oil, resin and shellac) to flow, ooze and drip across and down the canvas, with added scratches and other strokes. Such a method would seem to involve a large element of chance, but a close look at Massia's paintings reveals a high degree of care and control.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber | February 2, 1992
Miracles to debacles.The United States hockey team beats the Soviet Union in Lake Placid in 1980, and then spends the next two Olympic Winter Games slip-sliding to the bottom of the pack.Eric Heiden wins five gold medals in speed skating in 1980. Eight years later in Calgary, Alberta, the entire U.S. Olympic team wins six medals and only two are gold.Bill Johnson comes careening down a mountain in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, in 1984 to emerge as the Olympic downhill champion. Four years later, the United States not only doesn't win an alpine skiing medal, it has trouble finding competitors who can finish a race.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,SUN STAFF | October 7, 1995
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- No Breeders' Cup for Concern.That was the sentiment of trainer Dick Small last night after the champion Maryland-bred colt finished third, 4 1/2 lengths behind the winning Peaks And Valleys, in the $500,000 Meadowlands Cup at The Meadowlands racetrack.Jockey Julie Krone hugged the rail with Peaks And Valleys, the lone 3-year-old in the 1 1/8 -mile stakes, and opened a commanding lead after passing pace-setting Poor But Honest at the top of the stretch. Poor But Honest held on for second, two lengths in front of Concern, whose customary late rally fell short.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,Special to The Sun | November 22, 1994
Pro Musica Rara opened its 20th season at the Baltimore Museum of Art Sunday afternoon with the "Steps to Parnassus." Parnassus is the mountain in Greece associated with Apollo; unfortunately, Pro Musica Rara was not always at the peak.The collection of solo sonatas, trio sonatas, and solo suite were all masterworks, but the musical results were a little uneven.The program opened with the first of the "Mystery" sonatas of Heinrich Ignaz von Biber. Violinist Cynthia Roberts played with sensitivity and gave the music its melancholic flavor.
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