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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 7, 2002
More than 18,000 gallons of sewage overflowed in the Turners Station area of Baltimore County after power at two pumping stations was knocked out by storms early yesterday. The spills began at 4 a.m. after holding tanks reached their capacity, county officials said. Crews used portable generators to stop a spill at the Lyons Home Pumping Station at 119 Fleming Drive at 9 a.m. About 15,200 gallons of sewage leaked from the station. A spill at the nearby Day Village Pumping Station at 521 Avondale Road was halted about 9:45 a.m. after 3,200 gallons were lost.
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NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2005
One of the largest and most contentious residential developments ever proposed for Cecil County has been scrubbed, at least temporarily. W.L. Gore & Associates Inc., the technology company based in Wilmington, Del., and best known for its development and production of Gore-Tex, confirmed yesterday that it has purchased nearly 180 acres adjacent to its Cherry Hill plant where a New Jersey company wanted to built 978 housing units. "If there is going to be any development there in the future, it is going to be significantly smaller" than what had been proposed by Windsor Development Co. of Freehold, N.J., said Edmond Schneider, a spokesman for Gore.
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NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | March 15, 2005
One of the largest and most contentious residential developments ever proposed for Cecil County has been scrubbed, at least temporarily. W.L. Gore & Associates Inc., the technology company based in Wilmington, Del., and best known for its development and production of Gore-Tex, confirmed yesterday that it has purchased nearly 180 acres adjacent to its Cherry Hill plant where a New Jersey company wanted to built 978 housing units. "If there is going to be any development there in the future, it is going to be significantly smaller" than what had been proposed by Windsor Development Co. of Freehold, N.J., said Edmond Schneider, a spokesman for Gore.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
CHERRY HILL - One of the largest residential developments ever proposed for Cecil County has gotten larger, and the builder is looking at Harford and Frederick counties for similar projects. A New Jersey company, which had proposed building 922 residential units on a 146-acre peach orchard about 10 miles outside Elkton, disclosed Friday that it has acquired an additional 31 acres adjacent to its original site and has proposed another 56 housing units and a commercial district. With the exception of 300 apartments, the development would be limited to buyers age 55 or older, and it would bar children under 18 from living there, according to officials of Windsor Development Co. of Freehold, N.J. The smaller project stirred opposition about a week earlier from residents of rural Cherry Hill, who said it would destroy the character of their neighborhood, where single-family homes sit on half-acre, 1-acre and 5-acre lots.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
CHERRY HILL - One of the largest residential developments ever proposed for Cecil County has gotten larger, and the builder is looking at Harford and Frederick counties for similar projects. A New Jersey company, which had proposed building 922 residential units on a 146-acre peach orchard about 10 miles outside Elkton, disclosed Friday that it has acquired an additional 31 acres adjacent to its original site and has proposed another 56 housing units and a commercial district. With the exception of 300 apartments, the development would be limited to buyers age 55 or older, and it would bar children under 18 from living there, according to officials of Windsor Development Co. of Freehold, N.J. The smaller project stirred opposition about a week earlier from residents of rural Cherry Hill, who said it would destroy the character of their neighborhood, where single-family homes sit on half-acre, 1-acre and 5-acre lots.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
CHERRY HILL - One of the largest residential developments ever proposed for Cecil County has gotten larger, and the builder is looking at Harford and Frederick counties for similar projects. A New Jersey company, which had proposed building 922 residential units on a 146-acre peach orchard about 10 miles outside Elkton, disclosed Friday that it has acquired an additional 31 acres adjacent to its original site and has proposed another 56 housing units and a commercial district. With the exception of 300 apartments, the development would be limited to buyers age 55 or older, and it would bar children under 18 from living there, according to officials of Windsor Development Co. of Freehold, N.J. The smaller project stirred opposition about a week earlier from residents of rural Cherry Hill, who said it would destroy the character of their neighborhood, where single-family homes sit on half-acre, 1-acre and 5-acre lots.
TRAVEL
April 18, 1999
A MEMORABLE PLACEGhostly walk at GettysburgWe meet in a hotel parking lot in downtown Gettysburg and the three of us exchange greetings and begin to change into our uniforms. Two rebels and one Yankee. I pull on the wool trousers of the Union uniform similar to the ones my great-great-grandfather wore in 1863.We walk into a tavern called the Mine Shaft, which is where you traditionally start a ghost walk. Civil War re-enactors take a walk after the sun goes down and sleep on the battlefield on an anniversary such as this one. It is July 3 here in Gettysburg.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2004
CHERRY HILL -- One of the biggest residential development projects in the history of Cecil County is being bitterly opposed by residents of this Elkton suburban community who say it will double the size of their little town and destroy the charm of their quiet neighborhood. "That's adding a whole other city to our community," Lindsie Carter said of a proposal by a New Jersey developer to build 922 residential units on a 146-acre peach orchard near her home on Black Snake Road. Carter was speaking to more than 200 of her concerned neighbors who packed into Faith Southern Baptist Church here Thursday night to be briefed on the developer's plans and to form their strategy of opposition.
FEATURES
By Amy Davis | July 2, 1995
Gettysburg, Pa. -- Consider this: You're standing at the crossroads of the Civil War, and you want to inspire tourists to imagine how 35 square miles in this tranquil Pennsylvania countryside were the stage for a three-day inferno of smoke and death with casualties that numbered about 51,000.As a rookie guide and history fan, you know that the Battle of Gettysburg, 132 years ago this weekend, was the turning point of the war and its bloodiest fight, costing Robert E. Lee more than a third of his men. But acquiring such knowledge is the easy part; you must learn to spin it into compelling narratives, find clever ways to captivate your audience -- and maybe even invent some historical jokes.
NEWS
By Annie Peroutka and Annie Peroutka,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
On July 2, 1863, the charge and countercharge over the 19 acres of the Wheatfield resulted in 4,000 dead and wounded Union and Confederate soldiers on the second day of fighting at Gettysburg. "The Wheatfield has been aptly called the `whirlpool' of battle, because of the manner in which regiments on both sides were seemingly sucked into its vortex," observes author Edward J. Stackpole in They Met At Gettysburg. The fighting began about 4:30 p.m. on farmer George Rose's fields, At 4:30 p.m., Col. P. Regis de Trobriand was positioned with Union regiments along the southern edge of the Wheatfield behind a stone wall.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
CHERRY HILL - One of the largest residential developments ever proposed for Cecil County has gotten larger, and the builder is looking at Harford and Frederick counties for similar projects. A New Jersey company, which had proposed building 922 residential units on a 146-acre peach orchard about 10 miles outside Elkton, disclosed Friday that it has acquired an additional 31 acres adjacent to its original site and has proposed another 56 housing units and a commercial district. With the exception of 300 apartments, the development would be limited to buyers age 55 or older, and it would bar children under 18 from living there, according to officials of Windsor Development Co. of Freehold, N.J. The smaller project stirred opposition about a week earlier from residents of rural Cherry Hill, who said it would destroy the character of their neighborhood, where single-family homes sit on half-acre, 1-acre and 5-acre lots.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2004
CHERRY HILL -- One of the biggest residential development projects in the history of Cecil County is being bitterly opposed by residents of this Elkton suburban community who say it will double the size of their little town and destroy the charm of their quiet neighborhood. "That's adding a whole other city to our community," Lindsie Carter said of a proposal by a New Jersey developer to build 922 residential units on a 146-acre peach orchard near her home on Black Snake Road. Carter was speaking to more than 200 of her concerned neighbors who packed into Faith Southern Baptist Church here Thursday night to be briefed on the developer's plans and to form their strategy of opposition.
NEWS
By Annie Peroutka and Annie Peroutka,SUN STAFF | August 3, 2003
On July 2, 1863, the charge and countercharge over the 19 acres of the Wheatfield resulted in 4,000 dead and wounded Union and Confederate soldiers on the second day of fighting at Gettysburg. "The Wheatfield has been aptly called the `whirlpool' of battle, because of the manner in which regiments on both sides were seemingly sucked into its vortex," observes author Edward J. Stackpole in They Met At Gettysburg. The fighting began about 4:30 p.m. on farmer George Rose's fields, At 4:30 p.m., Col. P. Regis de Trobriand was positioned with Union regiments along the southern edge of the Wheatfield behind a stone wall.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 7, 2002
More than 18,000 gallons of sewage overflowed in the Turners Station area of Baltimore County after power at two pumping stations was knocked out by storms early yesterday. The spills began at 4 a.m. after holding tanks reached their capacity, county officials said. Crews used portable generators to stop a spill at the Lyons Home Pumping Station at 119 Fleming Drive at 9 a.m. About 15,200 gallons of sewage leaked from the station. A spill at the nearby Day Village Pumping Station at 521 Avondale Road was halted about 9:45 a.m. after 3,200 gallons were lost.
TRAVEL
April 18, 1999
A MEMORABLE PLACEGhostly walk at GettysburgWe meet in a hotel parking lot in downtown Gettysburg and the three of us exchange greetings and begin to change into our uniforms. Two rebels and one Yankee. I pull on the wool trousers of the Union uniform similar to the ones my great-great-grandfather wore in 1863.We walk into a tavern called the Mine Shaft, which is where you traditionally start a ghost walk. Civil War re-enactors take a walk after the sun goes down and sleep on the battlefield on an anniversary such as this one. It is July 3 here in Gettysburg.
FEATURES
By Amy Davis | July 2, 1995
Gettysburg, Pa. -- Consider this: You're standing at the crossroads of the Civil War, and you want to inspire tourists to imagine how 35 square miles in this tranquil Pennsylvania countryside were the stage for a three-day inferno of smoke and death with casualties that numbered about 51,000.As a rookie guide and history fan, you know that the Battle of Gettysburg, 132 years ago this weekend, was the turning point of the war and its bloodiest fight, costing Robert E. Lee more than a third of his men. But acquiring such knowledge is the easy part; you must learn to spin it into compelling narratives, find clever ways to captivate your audience -- and maybe even invent some historical jokes.
NEWS
By Brent Jones | May 20, 2009
Baltimore County police identified Monday a man shot to death Sunday in the 600 block of Peach Orchard Lane in the Turners Station neighborhood. Sylvester Eric Brown, 22, of the 4100 block of Coleman Ave. in Baltimore was shot in the upper body about 3 a.m. and pronounced dead at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, according to police. A woman walking with Brown was also shot. Police said Theresa Bunk, 21, of the 400 block of Avondale Road in Dundalk was shot several times and taken to Maryland Shock Trauma Center with life-threatening injuries.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Staff Writer | July 8, 1992
Roger Fell, who lives on Peach Orchard Road in Dundalk, strolls across his back yard, walks through his rear gate and steps proudly onto a grassy strip of land between his fence and his pier.The land this week became the newest part of his back yard. He didn't buy it or steal it. Baltimore County officials apparently forgot they owned the land. And, when a 1978 survey by county officials revealed that this land -- just under an acre -- had been improved and was being used by Mr. Fell and his neighbors, the county did not try to reclaim it.Instead, the county started charging some residents of Peach Orchard Road higher taxes for having waterfront property, even though the county has held legal title to the property since 1955.
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