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By GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE and GILBERT A. LEWTHWAITE,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 6, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The prospect of peace in the former Yugoslavia advances the timetable for deployment of U.S. troops to one of the world's most explosive areas, and confronts defense planners with crucial questions.How many U.S. troops should be sent, under whose command and for how long?The Clinton administration has put a ceiling of 25,000 peacekeepers, or about a full division, on a U.S. deployment in Bosnia. The U.S. force could be smaller, but Defense Secretary William J. Perry said this week that it would be "the biggest, toughest, meanest force in the area strong enough that it provides an enormous disincentive to anyone messing with it."
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 18, 2008
WASHINGTON - Even as Russia pledged to begin withdrawing its forces from neighboring Georgia today, U.S. officials said the Russian military had been moving launchers for short-range ballistic missiles into South Ossetia, a step that appeared intended to tighten its hold on the breakaway territory. The Russian military deployed several SS-21 missile launchers and supply vehicles to South Ossetia on Friday, according to U.S. officials familiar with intelligence reports. From the new launching positions north of Tskhinvali, the South Ossetian capital, the missiles can reach much of Georgia, including Tbilisi, the capital.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 27, 2001
BRUSSELS, Belgium - Although the Pentagon has said it wants to reduce NATO's peacekeeping mission in Bosnia, the alliance has decided that only modest cuts can safely be made at this time, Western officials say. Under a plan approved by NATO ambassadors last week and expected to be announced Tuesday, the alliance's peacekeeping force will be reduced from 21,000 to 18,000. The U.S. contingent in Bosnia, which is in the process of being cut to 3,600 troops, would be reduced to 3,100. And although NATO will consider steeper cuts later, the alliance's top military commander cautioned that they cannot be carried out until Bosnia has an effective police force and a functioning judicial system.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 24, 2008
ABU SUROUJ, Sudan -- As Darfur smolders in the aftermath of a new government offensive, a long-sought peacekeeping force, expected to be the world's largest, is in danger of failing even before it begins its mission because of bureaucratic delays, stonewalling by Sudan's government and reluctance from troop-contributing countries to send peacekeeping forces into an active conflict. The force, which officially took over from an overstretched and exhausted African Union force in Darfur on Jan. 1, has just more than 9,000 of an expected 26,000 soldiers and police officers, and will not fully deploy until the end of the year, U.N. officials said.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 15, 1999
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia -- The international peacekeeping force in Kosovo is clamping down hard on the Kosovo Liberation Army, seizing arms caches almost daily and confiscating documents and even cash in what some officials say is a determined effort to break the movement.NATO and United Nations officials maintain that the tougher action is routine, part of an agreement signed almost seven weeks ago that aimed to dismantle the rebel operation within three months.Until now, the NATO-led peacekeeping force has given the guerrillas a fairly wide berth.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 3, 1999
PRISTINA, Yugoslavia -- After weeks of complex negotiations, NATO and United Nations officials have agreed to the formation of a civilian emergency force from the remnants of the Kosovo Liberation Army.The army, once a guerrilla force against the Serbs, is being dismantled this month under U.N. supervision. But though its successor, tentatively called the Kosovo Corps, will retain much of its military command structure, the duties of the new force remain a sensitive issue.Though NATO sees the Kosovo Corps as a civilian force, the rebel army's officers inevitably see it as a potential core of a future national army and are selling it to their followers as such.
NEWS
By STEPHEN J. HEDGES and STEPHEN J. HEDGES,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- As diplomats talk about the prospects of a new multinational peacekeeping force to prevent further fighting between Israel and Hezbollah in Lebanon, a lesson or two can be drawn from the United Nations' multinational observer force of about 2,000 soldiers that is already there. The experience of the U.N. Interim Force in Lebanon, UNIFIL, has not been a good one. On the scene since 1978 and comprising soldiers from France, Poland, India, Italy and a few other countries, UNIFIL was unable to stop the July 12 Hezbollah border raid that resulted in the kidnapping of two Israeli soldiers.
NEWS
By MAGGIE FARLEY and MAGGIE FARLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 18, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- The United Nations scrambled yesterday to assemble a peacekeeping force for Lebanon after an offer of only 200 troops from France, which is expected to lead the contingent. A handful of countries made firm commitments at a meeting where Deputy Secretary-General Mark Malloch-Brown asked for 3,500 troops who could arrive in south Lebanon within 10 days to augment the existing U.N. force of 2,000. Italy and Spain, who are expected to be Europe's largest contributors, said they must receive Cabinet approval before making specific offers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2005
Shake Hands with the Devil: The Failure of Humanity in Rwanda By Romeo Dallaire with Brent Beardsley. Carrol & Graf Publishers. 584 pages. $16.95 softbound. A decade before the South Asia tsunami rallied world sympathy, a catastrophe of even greater human cost gripped the tiny Central African nation of Rwanda, claiming 800,000 lives in 100 days while the world did little. What`s more, the earlier horror might have been prevented or contained. This powerful book tells how. Romeo Dallaire, a Canadian lieutenant general, commanded a small United Nations peacekeeping force during the genocide in which extremists from Rwanda's Hutu majority slaughtered and raped as many minority Tutsis (and moderate Hutus)
NEWS
October 10, 2004
THERE WAS A TIME when democratically challenged and perennially troubled Haiti appeared to be on the precipice of change that would finally rid the island of a crippling political crisis and get it back on track in its slow march toward democracy. It was 1994, and Jean-Bertrand Aristide, Haiti's first freely elected president, was restored to power largely due to the efforts of a group of nations led by the United States calling themselves the "Friends of Haiti." What a difference a decade makes.
NEWS
By Maggie Farley and Maggie Farley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 1, 2007
UNITED NATIONS -- The Security Council authorized yesterday an extensive United Nations peacekeeping operation in Darfur aimed at protecting civilians and aid workers in the violence-racked region of Sudan. The council voted 15-0 to begin sending a joint U.N.-African Union force of up to 26,000 troops and police to Darfur before the end of the year to quell the violence that has killed more than 200,000 people and displaced more than 2 million in the past four years. It will take a year to muster the full force, and the cost will be about $2 billion, said peacekeeping chief Jean-Marie Guehenno, who added that a substantial number of troops will arrive in Darfur before year's end. Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon called the resolution "historic and unprecedented," and said it would help "improve the lives of the people of the region and close this tragic chapter in Sudan's history."
NEWS
By Mark Silva and Paul Salopek and Mark Silva and Paul Salopek,Chicago Tribune | May 30, 2007
WASHINGTON -- With the Bush administration ordering new sanctions against the government of Sudan yesterday, experts said any hope of alleviating suffering in the war-torn Darfur region will depend on the questionable ability of the United States to gain broader international support. President Bush, declaring that the United States "will not avert our eyes" from a crisis that has killed hundreds of thousands of people and displaced at least 2 million others, imposed a ban on Americans doing business with 31 mostly government-controlled Sudanese businesses, two leaders of the Sudanese government and a rebel chief.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | September 22, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- As world leaders gathered at the United Nations this week for the opening of the 61st General Assembly, the shadow of Darfur hung over them all. On Tuesday, from the U.N. podium, President Bush again labeled the slaughter of hundreds of thousands of civilians in Darfur as genocide. Yet the killing, conducted by Sudanese government forces and militias, is intensifying. Sudan is blocking a proposed U.N. peacekeeping force of 20,000, which would have strengthened an unarmed observer force from the African Union.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 26, 2006
BRUSSELS, Belgium -- After a week of confusion and missteps, Europe pledged to add up to 6,900 troops to the U.N. peacekeeping force in southern Lebanon, officials said at an emergency meeting of European Union foreign ministers here yesterday. But the officials cautioned that the force would not be used to disarm Hezbollah. That job, if it is done at all, will be left to the Lebanese government and army. The international force, joined by Lebanese national soldiers, is the solution that world powers agreed to after a month of fighting between Israel and Hezbollah, an Islamist militia that dominates southern Lebanon.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 21, 2006
PARIS --The shaky U.N.-brokered cease-fire in Lebanon suffered another blow yesterday when the European countries that have been called upon to provide the backbone of a peacekeeping force delayed a decision on committing troops until the mission is more clearly defined. Their reservations postponed any action on the force at least until Wednesday, when the European Union will take up the issue. Haunted by their experiences in Bosnia in the 1990s, when their forces were unable to stop widespread ethnic killing, European governments are insisting upon clarifying the chain of command and rules of engagement before plunging into the even greater complexities of the Middle East.
NEWS
By MAGGIE FARLEY and MAGGIE FARLEY,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 18, 2006
UNITED NATIONS -- The United Nations scrambled yesterday to assemble a peacekeeping force for Lebanon after an offer of only 200 troops from France, which is expected to lead the contingent. A handful of countries made firm commitments at a meeting where Deputy Secretary-General Mark Malloch-Brown asked for 3,500 troops who could arrive in south Lebanon within 10 days to augment the existing U.N. force of 2,000. Italy and Spain, who are expected to be Europe's largest contributors, said they must receive Cabinet approval before making specific offers.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 24, 2008
ABU SUROUJ, Sudan -- As Darfur smolders in the aftermath of a new government offensive, a long-sought peacekeeping force, expected to be the world's largest, is in danger of failing even before it begins its mission because of bureaucratic delays, stonewalling by Sudan's government and reluctance from troop-contributing countries to send peacekeeping forces into an active conflict. The force, which officially took over from an overstretched and exhausted African Union force in Darfur on Jan. 1, has just more than 9,000 of an expected 26,000 soldiers and police officers, and will not fully deploy until the end of the year, U.N. officials said.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | September 22, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- As world leaders gathered at the United Nations this week for the opening of the 61st General Assembly, the shadow of Darfur hung over them all. On Tuesday, from the U.N. podium, President Bush again labeled the slaughter of hundreds of thousands of civilians in Darfur as genocide. Yet the killing, conducted by Sudanese government forces and militias, is intensifying. Sudan is blocking a proposed U.N. peacekeeping force of 20,000, which would have strengthened an unarmed observer force from the African Union.
NEWS
By STEPHEN J. HEDGES and STEPHEN J. HEDGES,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- As diplomats talk about the prospects of a new multinational peacekeeping force to prevent further fighting between Israel and Hezbollah in Lebanon, a lesson or two can be drawn from the United Nations' multinational observer force of about 2,000 soldiers that is already there. The experience of the U.N. Interim Force in Lebanon, UNIFIL, has not been a good one. On the scene since 1978 and comprising soldiers from France, Poland, India, Italy and a few other countries, UNIFIL was unable to stop the July 12 Hezbollah border raid that resulted in the kidnapping of two Israeli soldiers.
NEWS
By LIZ SLY and LIZ SLY,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 24, 2006
BEIRUT, Lebanon -- International pressure mounted on the Bush administration yesterday to call for an immediate cease-fire in the hostilities between Israel and Hezbollah guerrillas as Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice headed to the region in search of a long-term solution to the 12-day-old conflict. With civilian casualties in Lebanon mounting, the United States' Arab allies added their voices to the calls for a truce. Saudi Arabia's foreign minister, Prince Saud al-Faisal, met with President Bush in the Oval Office and delivered a letter from King Abdullah II asking him to intervene.
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