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By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | August 24, 1994
QUNEITRA, Syria -- The skulls in open, looted coffins lay gaping at the sun, left just as Syria says it found them 20 years ago after withdrawing Israeli forces demolished the vacated city.The Syrians have not reburied the bones, nor rebuilt any of the city, captured by Israel in 1967 and returned -- crushed -- in 1974. They keep Quneitra as a macabre monument to what they say is Israeli brutality.It is just as much a monument to Syrian fears of Israel.Syria, the most steadfast of Israel's enemies in the Middle East, is grappling with those anxieties as it inches ever so slowly to what observers here say is an inevitable peace with its foe.This year or next, Syria is expected to come to some sort of terms and open its doors -- perhaps ever so slightly -- to neighbors long castigated as warmongering, aggressive and untrustworthy -- which is just about the way the Israelis view the Syrians.
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NEWS
February 14, 2012
The Sun editorial "Mr. Abbas' mission" (Feb. 13) is a triumph of wishful thinking over analysis. Its self-contradictions and omissions include: •Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas "would have to exercise the kind of statesmanship that has been sadly lacking among the Palestinians for generations" to lead a unity government of his Fatah movement and the terrorist Hamas to peace with Israel. "It's too early to say" if he could. It's hardly too early to say the 74-year-old Mr. Abbas can't and won't.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 20, 1994
EAI hasn't flunked yet. This is mid-terms.PLO made peace with Israel. Jordan made peace with Israel. Now PLO and Jordan should make up.It looks like we won't be bombing North Korea after all. Shucks.
NEWS
February 12, 2012
Signs of movement toward renewed cooperation between the Palestinian Authority and Hamas have Israeli officials on edge. Israel considers Hamas a terrorist organization committed to its destruction and has shunned negotiations. In the wake of Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas' efforts last fall to sidestep negotiations with Israel and seek United Nations recognition of a Palestinian state, it is easy to see this as another ominous sign for the prospects for peace. But there is another possibility at work.
NEWS
October 29, 1994
If President Clinton hit no home run on his Middle East trip, he touched many bases.He basked in the glory of the Jordan-Israel peace treaty, which was negotiated without U.S. help. He inserted himself into the stalled Syria-Israel dialogue, with no visible result. He preached the menace of Hamas to Yasser Arafat, who as target understands it better than anyone. He asserted his presence as commander-in-chief to the American troops in Kuwait, who never doubted his authority.There are two messages here -- one aimed at the world, one at himself and fellow-Americans.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - The escalation of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is damaging the fragile relations that the United States and Israel have developed with moderate Arab states, eroding the progress made in the decade since the Persian Gulf war. It has also made it harder for the Bush administration to isolate Iraq and gain Arab support for its drive to topple the government of President Saddam Hussein. Leaders in Jordan and Egypt, the only Arab states to have made peace with Israel, face growing anti-Israel sentiment that is increasingly directed against the United States as well.
NEWS
April 5, 2002
Hateful propaganda leads Muslim world to detest the West I agree with Thomas L. Friedman to the extent that he applauds the Bush administration's move to increase foreign aid to poor countries and asks for a foreign policy that pursues a course of "enlightened self-interest" ("Let's set a moral example for the world," Opinion * Commentary, March 20). But he is very wrong to assume the Muslims who hate us do so because of our greed or support for their bad regimes or anything we have done.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 25, 1994
MADABA, Jordan -- On the second day of the 1967 War, Israeli soldiers stuck a gun to the head of Mohammed Mousa and threatened to kill him. They chased his wife and four children from their home near Jerusalem, which they never saw again.Yet today, Mr. Mousa, 50, welcomes the prospect of peace between Israel and Jordan, his adopted home."It would be better for everyone," he said.Shukri Qiraja, now 62, was a soldier in Jordan's Arab Legion, guarding Jerusalem's Damascus Gate when the Israelis stormed through in that war. He hurriedly changed from his uniform to civilian clothes, and later slipped back to Amman to complete 24 years in the military.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush insisted yesterday that "there is real cause for optimism" in his efforts to win a Middle East peace conference despite obstacles that remain following Secretary of State James A. Baker III's latest mission to the region.Mr. Bush made his announcement to reporters after he and Mr. Baker put through a call to Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak as they met to discuss the results of the Baker trip that ended Thursday night.The president refused to discuss any details of the call or explain the reasons for his optimism, citing the sensitivity of the negotiations.
NEWS
August 5, 1993
Syria holds the key to Arab peace with Israel. If Syria traded peace for Golan, the rug would be pulled out from those who wish to continue war. Secretary of State Warren Christopher's Middle East shuttle diplomacy is seeking no less than that.While using the same Middle East adviser, Dennis Ross, that his predecessor James A. Baker III brought to the State Department, Mr. Christopher has shunned Mr. Baker's studied detachment. He is not merely bringing the parties together and seeking influence behind the scenes, he is aggressively and publicly involved and putting U.S. proposals forward.
NEWS
May 20, 2011
Regarding your editorial "Obama and the Arab Spring" (May 20), your assessment that the president laid out a "pragmatic, nuanced approach to the region" is not borne out by the realities on the ground. The region is still embroiled in chaos and conflict. Most recently Coptic Christians and Islamists have clashed in Egypt. Libya seems mired in stalemate. Bahrain and Syria continue repression and murder of protesters on the streets. And Saudi Arabia's royal family is not even remotely ready for democracy.
NEWS
By Natan Sharansky | December 14, 2004
YASSER ARAFAT is dead. A so-called moderate is now chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization. Elections to choose a Palestinian Authority president are scheduled in the West Bank and Gaza for early January. Optimists see an opportunity for restarting the Israeli-Palestinian peace process and the possibility of a meaningful and comprehensive settlement of the conflict. But whether this will really prove to be a positive turning point in the search for peace in the Middle East depends on whether we have learned from the failures of the past.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | November 18, 2003
WASHINGTON - You know when I really get mad? It's when my wife tells me I'm not helping around the house - and I have not been helping around the house. There is nothing more enraging than someone exposing your faults - and being right. What is true at home is true in diplomacy. I was reminded of that watching the enraged, hysterical reaction of Israel's ruling Likud Party to the virtual peace treaty - known as the Geneva Accord - that was hammered out by Yossi Beilin, the former Israeli justice minister, and Yasser Abed Rabbo, the former Palestinian information minister.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 9, 2003
JERUSALEM - Hours after Palestinian militants killed five Israeli soldiers in two attacks, Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon faced a raucous and sometimes volatile crowd of fellow Likud Party members last night and defended his support for a U.S.-backed peace plan. Staring at hundreds of ultranationalists holding placards and loudly accusing him of "yielding to terror," Sharon calmly stood at a convention hall lectern and told his party's divided Central Committee that Israel would cautiously follow the "road map" to peace.
NEWS
April 5, 2002
Hateful propaganda leads Muslim world to detest the West I agree with Thomas L. Friedman to the extent that he applauds the Bush administration's move to increase foreign aid to poor countries and asks for a foreign policy that pursues a course of "enlightened self-interest" ("Let's set a moral example for the world," Opinion * Commentary, March 20). But he is very wrong to assume the Muslims who hate us do so because of our greed or support for their bad regimes or anything we have done.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - The escalation of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is damaging the fragile relations that the United States and Israel have developed with moderate Arab states, eroding the progress made in the decade since the Persian Gulf war. It has also made it harder for the Bush administration to isolate Iraq and gain Arab support for its drive to topple the government of President Saddam Hussein. Leaders in Jordan and Egypt, the only Arab states to have made peace with Israel, face growing anti-Israel sentiment that is increasingly directed against the United States as well.
NEWS
July 27, 1994
With the Washington Declaration, Israel has now made peace with three of its neighbors, Egypt, Palestine and Jordan. That leaves the northern border with Syria and Lebanon, where terrorism remains an irritant but not a threat to the state. The PLO's separate peace led directly to Jordan's, which adds to the pressure on Syria and its Lebanese protectorate to follow.Jordan is an important addition to the circle of peace because the prospects of cooperation between it and Israel flow so naturally from geography.
NEWS
December 15, 1992
Nowhere is Islamic fundamentalism a greater danger to the U.S. foreign policy that President-elect Clinton will inherit than in Egypt. The peace between Egypt and Israel brokered by the Carter administration in the 1970s remains the cornerstone for all further peace efforts. An overthrow of the moderate and canny regime of Hosni Mubarak from a fundamentalist flank would renounce recognition of Israel and be a disaster for peace.But in Egypt as elsewhere, fundamentalist extremism feeds on economic distress.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 5, 2001
WASHINGTON - For years, American presidents have walked a fine line in the Middle East, balancing U.S. friendship and support for Israel with a need to be seen in the Arab world as fair peace brokers between Palestinians and the Jewish state. But after last weekend's Palestinian suicide bombings in Israel, and a so-far successful military campaign in Afghanistan, President Bush has, at least for now, become Israel's public partner in a joint war against terrorists. And that has changed the balance in the peace process - with Israel and the United States now more nearly on one side, and Yasser Arafat's Palestinian Authority alone on the other.
NEWS
By George F. Will | October 23, 2000
JERUSALEM - Since 1948, when Israel was founded on one-sixth of 1 percent of the land carelessly called "the Arab world," the conflict has been not about what land Israel should occupy but whether it should occupy any land. The conflict has been constantly violent but now, in today's world climate of appeasement, the Palestinians' violence is self-legitimizing: The assumption always is that they must have been provoked. Today, and as usual, the problem is not that Israel is being provocative, but that Israel's being is provocative.
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