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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser | August 20, 2003
Laurel-based Toccet, racing for the first time since December, cruised to victory by three-quarters of a length in the $35,300 Widener Stakes yesterday at Philadelphia Park. Ridden by Jorge Chavez, Toccet completed the 1 1/16 miles in 1 minute, 45.20 seconds as the 1-10 favorite. He paid $2.20 to win. One of last year's top 2-year-olds, Toccet was sidelined eight months with leg injuries. Next on his schedule is the $750,000 Pennsylvania Derby on Sept. 1. Also aiming for that race is Bobby Frankel-trained Peace Rules, winner of the Haskell Invitational Handicap, Blue Grass Stakes and Louisiana Derby.
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NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 26, 2004
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - In a faded red dress and broken flip-flops, Sonya Noel watched with resignation as gangsters erected flaming barricades to block Cite Soleil's street market just two days after U.N. troops had cleared away earlier impediments to commerce. The fruit and snack vendors in the sprawling seaside slum had been driven off the streets by violence for months, deprived of their livelihood and threatened by gunmen demanding the return of exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.
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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2003
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - The Kentucky Derby proved again yesterday that it can humble royal dreams and turn humble dreams into royalty. The long-shot Funny Cide, a New York-bred trained by a down-to-earth former Marylander, outran the regally bred Empire Maker, owned by a prince, to capture the 129th Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs. It was a victory for the little guy. Funny Cide is owned by a syndicate started by six high school buddies from upstate New York. They chipped in $5,000 each thinking, "if we can get a nice New York-bred along the way that'd be great," said Jack Knowlton, the managing partner.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser | August 20, 2003
Laurel-based Toccet, racing for the first time since December, cruised to victory by three-quarters of a length in the $35,300 Widener Stakes yesterday at Philadelphia Park. Ridden by Jorge Chavez, Toccet completed the 1 1/16 miles in 1 minute, 45.20 seconds as the 1-10 favorite. He paid $2.20 to win. One of last year's top 2-year-olds, Toccet was sidelined eight months with leg injuries. Next on his schedule is the $750,000 Pennsylvania Derby on Sept. 1. Also aiming for that race is Bobby Frankel-trained Peace Rules, winner of the Haskell Invitational Handicap, Blue Grass Stakes and Louisiana Derby.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2003
The field for the 128th Preakness Stakes on May 17 at Pimlico continued its ebb and flow yesterday as two horses were pulled and one was tossed in. Bob Baffert, trainer of four Preakness winners, said yesterday he had decided to run Senor Swinger, impressive winner of the Crown Royal American Turf at Churchill Downs. He said the colt, who will be ridden by Pat Day, would join Indian Express as his two Preakness entrants. Patrick Valenzuela, winner of the 1989 Preakness with Sunday Silence, will replace Tyler Baze aboard Indian Express, who finished 14th after a troubled trip in the Kentucky Derby.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2003
Funny Cide arrived at Pimlico Race Course on Friday a Kentucky Derby winner with something to prove. He departed last night the emphatic winner of the Preakness, with vindication, new respect and one last hurdle to surmount. With an electrifying performance in front of 100,268 chilly patrons, the New York-bred gelding captured the 128th Preakness by 9 3/4 lengths. Only one horse has won the race by more - Survivor by 10 lengths in the inaugural Preakness in 1873. After snaring the Kentucky Derby and Preakness, Funny Cide will attempt in three weeks to win the Belmont Stakes and become the 12th horse to win the Triple Crown.
SPORTS
By Steve Davidowitz and Steve Davidowitz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 17, 2003
In the Kentucky Derby, Funny Cide had the perfect trip. He avoided the wide run on both turns that cost favored Empire Maker some energy, and he avoided the speed duel with front-running Brancusi that sapped some of Peace Rules' reserve power. But, before we expect Peace Rules to turn the tables, we should appreciate something else about Funny Cide's Derby performance. Funny Cide acted the part of a mature racehorse. Not only did he relax beautifully behind a front-running speed duel, but he also maintained control of his energy until Jose Santos gave him the command to make his best bid when it counted.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Sun Reporter | May 18, 2003
Funny Cide arrived at Pimlico Race Course on Friday a Kentucky Derby winner with something to prove. He departed last night the emphatic winner of the Preakness , with vindication, new respect and one last hurdle to surmount. With an electrifying performance in front of 100,268 chilly patrons, the New York -bred gelding captured the 128th Preakness by 9 3/4 lengths. Only one horse has won the race by more - Survivor by 10 lengths in the inaugural Preakness in 1873.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2003
Midway through the Preakness yesterday, jockey Jose Santos took a quick peek behind him to see if any competitor was coming up to challenge Funny Cide. "On the backside, I took him into the clear and I looked for the traffic, and there was no traffic," said Santos. Horse and rider were well on their way to a good, old-fashioned country whipping of the field. In a race virtually free of major incidents and/or congestion, Funny Cide survived a slight brush with New York Hero coming out of the gate, his No. 9 post position and an early challenge from Peace Rules to overwhelm a 3-year-old lineup somewhat diluted in quality by injuries.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | September 28, 1997
It wasn't hard to hear the collective sigh of relief around Baltimore's Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse complex last week. Circuit Judges Kenneth Lavon Johnson and John Carroll Byrnes had been nominated for reappointment; Gov. Parris N. Glendening had rapidly capitulated by renaming them to the bench.There was, as administrative Judge Joseph H.H. Kaplan put it, "peace in the valley."To the courthouse's 30 "sitting judges," the nominations came as an enormous political boon. Perhaps more elementally, they brought as well the recognition that judges are not expected to be perfect, that there are exceptions to the notion that judges must act and sound the same - and can, within reason, even get away with the occasional display of temper.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2003
Midway through the Preakness yesterday, jockey Jose Santos took a quick peek behind him to see if any competitor was coming up to challenge Funny Cide. "On the backside, I took him into the clear and I looked for the traffic, and there was no traffic," said Santos. Horse and rider were well on their way to a good, old-fashioned country whipping of the field. In a race virtually free of major incidents and/or congestion, Funny Cide survived a slight brush with New York Hero coming out of the gate, his No. 9 post position and an early challenge from Peace Rules to overwhelm a 3-year-old lineup somewhat diluted in quality by injuries.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Sun Reporter | May 18, 2003
Funny Cide arrived at Pimlico Race Course on Friday a Kentucky Derby winner with something to prove. He departed last night the emphatic winner of the Preakness , with vindication, new respect and one last hurdle to surmount. With an electrifying performance in front of 100,268 chilly patrons, the New York -bred gelding captured the 128th Preakness by 9 3/4 lengths. Only one horse has won the race by more - Survivor by 10 lengths in the inaugural Preakness in 1873.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2003
Funny Cide arrived at Pimlico Race Course on Friday a Kentucky Derby winner with something to prove. He departed last night the emphatic winner of the Preakness, with vindication, new respect and one last hurdle to surmount. With an electrifying performance in front of 100,268 chilly patrons, the New York-bred gelding captured the 128th Preakness by 9 3/4 lengths. Only one horse has won the race by more - Survivor by 10 lengths in the inaugural Preakness in 1873. After snaring the Kentucky Derby and Preakness, Funny Cide will attempt in three weeks to win the Belmont Stakes and become the 12th horse to win the Triple Crown.
SPORTS
By Steve Davidowitz and Steve Davidowitz,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 17, 2003
In the Kentucky Derby, Funny Cide had the perfect trip. He avoided the wide run on both turns that cost favored Empire Maker some energy, and he avoided the speed duel with front-running Brancusi that sapped some of Peace Rules' reserve power. But, before we expect Peace Rules to turn the tables, we should appreciate something else about Funny Cide's Derby performance. Funny Cide acted the part of a mature racehorse. Not only did he relax beautifully behind a front-running speed duel, but he also maintained control of his energy until Jose Santos gave him the command to make his best bid when it counted.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2003
The drama of the post-position draw for the 128th Preakness was established before the selections even began at the ESPN Zone last night. It happened earlier in the day in the Pimlico Race Course press box when the connections of Kentucky Derby-winner Funny Cide were tabbed to pick their gate last among the 10 entries during the pull of pills determining the order of selection. Left with no options, Funny Cide will break from the No. 9 spot, two gates outside Peace Rules, the Derby's third-place finisher and second choice in the Preakness' morning-line odds.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 8, 2003
The field for the 128th Preakness Stakes on May 17 at Pimlico continued its ebb and flow yesterday as two horses were pulled and one was tossed in. Bob Baffert, trainer of four Preakness winners, said yesterday he had decided to run Senor Swinger, impressive winner of the Crown Royal American Turf at Churchill Downs. He said the colt, who will be ridden by Pat Day, would join Indian Express as his two Preakness entrants. Patrick Valenzuela, winner of the 1989 Preakness with Sunday Silence, will replace Tyler Baze aboard Indian Express, who finished 14th after a troubled trip in the Kentucky Derby.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 26, 2004
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - In a faded red dress and broken flip-flops, Sonya Noel watched with resignation as gangsters erected flaming barricades to block Cite Soleil's street market just two days after U.N. troops had cleared away earlier impediments to commerce. The fruit and snack vendors in the sprawling seaside slum had been driven off the streets by violence for months, deprived of their livelihood and threatened by gunmen demanding the return of exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2003
The drama of the post-position draw for the 128th Preakness was established before the selections even began at the ESPN Zone last night. It happened earlier in the day in the Pimlico Race Course press box when the connections of Kentucky Derby-winner Funny Cide were tabbed to pick their gate last among the 10 entries during the pull of pills determining the order of selection. Left with no options, Funny Cide will break from the No. 9 spot, two gates outside Peace Rules, the Derby's third-place finisher and second choice in the Preakness' morning-line odds.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2003
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - The Kentucky Derby proved again yesterday that it can humble royal dreams and turn humble dreams into royalty. The long-shot Funny Cide, a New York-bred trained by a down-to-earth former Marylander, outran the regally bred Empire Maker, owned by a prince, to capture the 129th Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs. It was a victory for the little guy. Funny Cide is owned by a syndicate started by six high school buddies from upstate New York. They chipped in $5,000 each thinking, "if we can get a nice New York-bred along the way that'd be great," said Jack Knowlton, the managing partner.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin | September 28, 1997
It wasn't hard to hear the collective sigh of relief around Baltimore's Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse complex last week. Circuit Judges Kenneth Lavon Johnson and John Carroll Byrnes had been nominated for reappointment; Gov. Parris N. Glendening had rapidly capitulated by renaming them to the bench.There was, as administrative Judge Joseph H.H. Kaplan put it, "peace in the valley."To the courthouse's 30 "sitting judges," the nominations came as an enormous political boon. Perhaps more elementally, they brought as well the recognition that judges are not expected to be perfect, that there are exceptions to the notion that judges must act and sound the same - and can, within reason, even get away with the occasional display of temper.
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