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Peace Plan

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NEWS
October 22, 1991
By a margin of nearly 53 percent to 47 percent, callers to SUNDIAL say the United States should keep pressure on Israel to stay at the table in the Mideast peace conference until a plan has been reached. The numbers were 255 in favor out of 483 calls, with the remaining 228 saying the United States should not pressure Israel."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically, as would be done in a scientific public opinion poll.
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NEWS
By Michael Lerner | May 24, 2011
President Barack Obama is reported to have said to his advisors last week that Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu would never make the concessions necessary for a peace accord. Well, we in the peace movement say, "duhhh. " If the president really understands this, it is time for him to go over the heads of the leadership in Israel, the West Bank and Gaza and directly to the Israeli and Palestinian people, with a full-blown peace accord that would show what the U.S. could enthusiastically support.
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NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | February 10, 2002
WASHINGTON - Memo to: President Hosni Mubarak, Crown Prince Abdullah, King Abdullah, President Bashar al-Assad and the rest of the Arab League From: President Bush Dear friends: You've all warned me privately about the foul wind of anti-Americanism that is blowing through your region, fed by the perception that I've bowed out of Mideast diplomacy and given a blank check to Prime Minister Ariel Sharon of Israel. So let me explain to you exactly my position: I believe your problems with us grow from a misreading of Arab-Israeli history.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2007
At least five groups with divergent agendas are expected to stage protests or peace rallies today in Annapolis as Middle East leaders meet on the grounds of the U.S. Naval Academy. Shalom International, which vehemently opposes any talks between Israelis and Palestinians, and Americans For a Safe Israel have obtained permits from the city to protest. Another group, Neturei Karta International, which bills itself as an anti-Zionism organization, also plans to protest. Annapolis police said there was no way to be sure how many protesters or peace demonstrators will show up today.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 29, 1993
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Bosnia's Muslim-dominated Parliament voted last night to reject a United Nations peace plan and to return the Bosnian negotiating team to Geneva to seek territorial and constitutional adjustments to the proposal, which would reorganize this country into three ethnic republics.The 65-to-0 vote portends a prolongation of the war in Bosnia because earlier last week Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic threatened new Serbian military action unless Parliament accepted the U.N. plan.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 6, 1993
PALE, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Ignoring appeals from both friends and foes, delegates to the self-styled Bosnian Serb parliament voted overwhelmingly today to reject the plan to end the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina and put the peace accord to the (( people in a referendum.Voting at the end of a 17-hour session at which the presidents of Serbia and Yugoslavia and the Greek prime minister joined their own leader in pleading with them to accept the peace plan, delegates to the self-declared parliament voted 65 to 1 with 12 abstentions to call a referendum of all Bosnian Serbs May 15 and 16 to ratify their rejection of the plan.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | April 11, 1995
JERUSALEM -- It seemed an insignificant act in the wake of tragedy: Israel ordered thousands of Palestinians yesterday to stay off two main roads in the Gaza Strip that were used in bomb attacks Sunday.But the order showed how the peace plan is slipping further from its goal. Blockading the Gaza Strip's main roads will not stop attacks by Palestinian fanatics. But it is certain to further embitter thousands of Palestinians whose support is needed for the peace plan to work.An eighth victim of Sunday's suicide bombings died yesterday: Aliza Flatow, 20, a New Jersey college student who was riding on the bus hit by the first of two bomb explosions Sunday.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Staff Writer | September 1, 1993
MITZPEH JERICHO, Israeli-occupied West Bank -- From high on their outpost hill, protected by barbed wire, a security gate and a young man with an M-16, the 600 Jewish settlers of Mitzpeh Jericho gaze to the west and see no prospect of peace, no matter what the diplomats say.They see only that the enemy is drawing closer, preparing to vault the distant green ribbon of the Jordan River and fill the desert valley below, where the lights of neighboring ancient...
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 18, 2002
WASHINGTON - Syria, a pivotal player in the Middle East for decades, looms as a possible spoiler in President's Bush's strategy for halting Israeli-Palestinian violence and toppling the Iraqi regime of Saddam Hussein. Syria has backed Palestinian radicals and allowed weapons to flow to Hezbollah guerrillas in Lebanon, posing what an Israeli diplomat calls "the single greatest threat to regional stability in the immediate term." In addition, U.S. officials say, Damascus has developed closer ties to Baghdad, allowing Iraq to smuggle out oil and allowing frequent air travel and shipments to Iraq in violation of United Nations sanctions.
NEWS
By Noha el Hennawy and Megan K. Stack and Noha el Hennawy and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 30, 2007
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- Arab rulers called on Israel to accept a peace plan that would normalize ties and put an end to the searing, decades-old Arab-Israeli conflict as the annual Arab summit drew to a close here yesterday. But both sides remained skeptical of the other's intentions. Calling for Israel to relinquish lands it captured in the 1967 war and for the long-elusive creation of a Palestinian state, the plan was flatly rejected by Israel when it was first unveiled in 2002. Even as they threw their political weight behind a push for peace, the rulers gathered in the Saudi capital sniped at Israel.
NEWS
By Noha el Hennawy and Megan K. Stack and Noha el Hennawy and Megan K. Stack,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 30, 2007
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia -- Arab rulers called on Israel to accept a peace plan that would normalize ties and put an end to the searing, decades-old Arab-Israeli conflict as the annual Arab summit drew to a close here yesterday. But both sides remained skeptical of the other's intentions. Calling for Israel to relinquish lands it captured in the 1967 war and for the long-elusive creation of a Palestinian state, the plan was flatly rejected by Israel when it was first unveiled in 2002. Even as they threw their political weight behind a push for peace, the rulers gathered in the Saudi capital sniped at Israel.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | November 22, 2005
JERUSALEM -- Appearing on Israeli television last night to announce his decision to abandon the right-wing Likud Party he helped found more than 30 years ago and create a new centrist party, Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon appeared upbeat and cheerful, like a man who had suddenly been liberated - which, in fact, he had. Life within the Likud Party had become one of "incessant difficulties and incessant obstacles," he said, after seeing his political agenda...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 1, 2005
ALGIERS -- Algerian authorities said yesterday that 82 percent of eligible voters poured into the polls a day earlier, with a 97 percent majority approving a referendum that the president promoted as a way for Algeria to get past the killing and violence of a civil war that has spanned more than a decade. There was no independent oversight of the voting process or oversight of the counting process, and anecdotal reports from around the capital region suggested that the turnout was far lower than reported.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 22, 2005
JERUSALEM - Palestinians reacted with dismay yesterday to Israel's announcement that it will build 3,500 more housing units in and near the West Bank's largest Jewish settlement, in apparent contravention of a U.S.-backed peace blueprint. Meanwhile, after several days of delay and argument, Israel formally handed over the West Bank town of Tulkarm to Palestinian security control late yesterday. Tulkarm is the second of five Palestinian towns and cities from which Israeli troops are pulling back under an agreement reached last month at a summit in Egypt.
NEWS
September 7, 2004
AT AN "Ask President Bush" get-together in Nashua, N.H., last week (the sort of event not known for tough questioning), a young woman confronted the candidate about his support for Israel's prime minister: "How can Ariel Sharon be a man of peace, as you've said, if he causes death and torture among innocent Palestinians?" It was a twofer for Mr. Bush - a chance to reiterate his war on terrorism message and remind supporters of Israel how much he is on their side. "First of all, Ariel Sharon is defending his country against terrorist attacks, just like we will," Mr. Bush replied.
NEWS
By Carol J. Williams and Carol J. Williams,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 24, 2004
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - As dozens of Marines arrived yesterday to secure the U.S. Embassy, Secretary of State Colin L. Powell sought to head off a bloody clash for control of the Haitian capital, urging opposition politicians to accept a power-sharing deal with President Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Early yesterday, the Haitian opposition was poised to announce its rejection of the proposal. But in a conference call with about 20 opposition leaders, Powell asked them to take another 24 hours to consider a proposal from U.S. and international diplomats to end a violent insurrection sweeping across the impoverished Caribbean nation.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 30, 2003
WASHINGTON - Having waited for more than two years as the Israeli and Palestinian death tolls mounted, President Bush is poised to enter the thicket of Middle East peacemaking, facing major obstacles in the region and wariness on Capitol Hill and leading an often divided team of advisers. Now that Palestinians have picked a prime minister, Mahmoud Abbas, who considers the armed uprising a failure, Bush has promised to throw his weight behind a U.S.-European "road map" intended to end Israeli-Palestinian bloodshed and launch a renewed peace process culminating in an independent Palestine co-existing with a secure Israel by 2005.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 1, 2003
NETZARIM JUNCTION, Gaza Strip - This is a simple-looking intersection, straightforward in its design and purely functional. It is remarkable only for its location and the people who cross it. The roads don't just intersect, they collide, with the full force of the Middle East conflict. Jewish settlers speed east and west between Israel and a settlement built under swaying palm trees. Palestinians used to travel across the intersection heading north or south, along the length of the Gaza Strip.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 22, 2003
JERUSALEM - Tens of thousands of Jewish settlers in the West Bank and Gaza Strip would have to be evacuated if Israel carries out its plan to disengage from the Palestinians and declare provisional borders, Israel's vice premier said yesterday. Ehud Olmert's comments gave the first indication of how many settlers might be displaced under a plan that Prime Minister Ariel Sharon unveiled Thursday at a conference on security. Sharon said the plan would be carried out only if there is no progress on the U.S.-backed "road map" peace plan in the next few months.
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