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NEWS
By Joel Greenberg and Joel Greenberg,Chicago Tribune | November 10, 2008
JERUSALEM - With a year-end target date for a Middle East peace agreement certain to be missed, international mediators pledged support yesterday for continued Israeli-Palestinian negotiations, and their envoy, Tony Blair, urged President-elect Barack Obama to make the peace effort a priority. Meeting at the Egyptian Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheik, representatives of the so-called Quartet - made up of the United States, the European Union, the United Nations and Russia - were briefed by Israeli Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas on talks launched nearly a year ago at a conference hosted by President Bush in Annapolis.
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NEWS
May 26, 2011
Letter writer Abel J. Merrill expresses disappointment in President Obama for "demanding" that Israel withdraw to its pre-1967 borders ("Obama shows ignorance or malice toward Israel," May 25). Mr. Merrill must watch Fox News exclusively, since the president said no such thing. What he said is that negotiations must begin with the 1967 borders. Like all complex issues, peace negotiations require intelligence and a willingness to compromise. In the 21st century, war is less and less an option.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 19, 1993
DAMASCUS, Syria -- Arab foreign ministers are expected to decide here today to delay the next round of peace negotiations with Israel at least a week beyond the Tuesday date set by President Clinton and Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, according to Arab diplomats and sources close to the deliberations in Syria.Palestinian officials, who have been pushing for a delay in the Middle East peace talks until after Israel offers more concessions, said their Arab counterparts had agreed to a one-week delay in the resumption of the 18-month-old negotiations in Washington.
NEWS
May 24, 2011
Perhaps you are right that peace negotiations based on Israel's pre-1967 boundaries, though perhaps arbitrary, are basically "what has to happen" to end the Israel-Palestine conflict ("Obama and the Arab Spring," May 19). But you should firmly tell our president that in order to demonstrate his moral leadership and credibility, he should have the U.S. first pull back from all its occupied territories. First, the territories won in World War II: Guam, Wake Island, the Marianna Islands and Midway Island.
NEWS
July 14, 1992
Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin's bold call for stepped-up peace negotiations between Israel and its Arab neighbors is what the world wanted to hear, and what the majority of Israelis voted for on June 23. It was vigorous and purposeful, yet tough.The old general will retain the defense portfolio in his cabinet, taking personal responsibility for the security of the Israeli settlers in the occupied territories, even while restricting new settlements to areas he deems strategic, such as the Golan Heights, Jordan Valley and outskirts of Jerusalem.
NEWS
May 24, 2011
Perhaps you are right that peace negotiations based on Israel's pre-1967 boundaries, though perhaps arbitrary, are basically "what has to happen" to end the Israel-Palestine conflict ("Obama and the Arab Spring," May 19). But you should firmly tell our president that in order to demonstrate his moral leadership and credibility, he should have the U.S. first pull back from all its occupied territories. First, the territories won in World War II: Guam, Wake Island, the Marianna Islands and Midway Island.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 24, 2000
JERUSALEM -- Israel and the Palestinians will intensify their peace negotiations over the next few weeks, but it is growing increasingly unlikely that they will reach a framework agreement by the goal of mid-February, Israel's senior negotiator said yesterday. "If I have to be realistic, it is difficult to reach this date," Oded Eran, the negotiator, said in a breakfast meeting with foreign journalists. Eran was acknowledging publicly what Israeli, Palestinian and U.S. officials have been saying privately for weeks, and the way he talked made it seem that he assumed the deadline would not be met. This represents a deflation of the hope of rapid progress that Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak expressed in the fall.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | June 20, 1992
JERUSALEM -- Israel's police minister yesterday said he will arrest members of the Palestinian peace talks delegation for meeting with the chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization.Such arrests could paralyze the U.S.-sponsored peace negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians.Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir gave somewhat guarded support to the police minister's promise. He was quoted by Israel Radio yesterday as saying he expected legal action would be taken.The delegates were due to return tomorrow from their meeting in Amman, Jordan, with PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat.
NEWS
May 23, 2011
President Obama was right to stick by his call for Israel’s 1967 boundaries as a starting point for peace negotiations with the Palestinians, in the face of an outsized reaction from Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. The statement made in the president’s Thursday speech on the political upheaval in the Middle East was not nearly so earth shaking as Mr. Netanyahu and Israel’s other supposed friends have made it out to be. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has publicly said the same thing, and the lines established prior to the 1967 war have been the de facto basis for all of the recent efforts at reconciliation and establishment of a Palestinian state.
NEWS
May 26, 2011
Letter writer Abel J. Merrill expresses disappointment in President Obama for "demanding" that Israel withdraw to its pre-1967 borders ("Obama shows ignorance or malice toward Israel," May 25). Mr. Merrill must watch Fox News exclusively, since the president said no such thing. What he said is that negotiations must begin with the 1967 borders. Like all complex issues, peace negotiations require intelligence and a willingness to compromise. In the 21st century, war is less and less an option.
NEWS
May 23, 2011
President Obama was right to stick by his call for Israel’s 1967 boundaries as a starting point for peace negotiations with the Palestinians, in the face of an outsized reaction from Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. The statement made in the president’s Thursday speech on the political upheaval in the Middle East was not nearly so earth shaking as Mr. Netanyahu and Israel’s other supposed friends have made it out to be. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has publicly said the same thing, and the lines established prior to the 1967 war have been the de facto basis for all of the recent efforts at reconciliation and establishment of a Palestinian state.
NEWS
By Joel Greenberg and Joel Greenberg,Chicago Tribune | November 10, 2008
JERUSALEM - With a year-end target date for a Middle East peace agreement certain to be missed, international mediators pledged support yesterday for continued Israeli-Palestinian negotiations, and their envoy, Tony Blair, urged President-elect Barack Obama to make the peace effort a priority. Meeting at the Egyptian Red Sea resort of Sharm el-Sheik, representatives of the so-called Quartet - made up of the United States, the European Union, the United Nations and Russia - were briefed by Israeli Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas on talks launched nearly a year ago at a conference hosted by President Bush in Annapolis.
NEWS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN REPORTER | November 26, 2007
Ella Issacharoff knew exactly why she joined more than 100 people in Annapolis yesterday at an international and interfaith rally for peace. "I want to represent the kids of Israel, and we would like peace with the Palestinian children," said Ella, 12, an Israeli who now lives in Bethesda. "That way, when we grow up, we can be friends, and hopefully one day the Palestinians will have their own independent nation, and we can stand side by side as friends." Ella, whose father is an Israeli diplomat, lived in Israel for more than half her life.
NEWS
By Paul Watson and Paul Watson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 2, 2004
NEW DELHI, India - Amid signs of strain, India and Pakistan agreed yesterday to begin new negotiations at the end of this month. The first round of peace talks between the countries' foreign secretaries, the top civil servants under the foreign ministers, are set for June 27 and 28, said Indian Foreign Minister Natwar Singh. He said Indian and Pakistani experts would meet here June 19 and 20 to discuss confidence-building measures, such as trade matters and steps to avoid accidental war. "The past has been scribbled with booby traps on the ground and high-tension wires above," said Singh, a veteran diplomat and former ambassador to Pakistan.
NEWS
January 8, 2004
India's prime minister and Pakistan's president surprised their countries and the world by drifting away from a regional summit in Islamabad this week, talking face to face and striking an agreement to begin peace talks next month. The rapprochement has significance for the region and the world. Both countries have nuclear weapons, and they have come close to war twice during the past two years. The most difficult issue for Muslim Pakistan and Hindu India has been Kashmir. The mountainous, Muslim region is mostly controlled by India, and its independence or incorporation into Pakistan has been a source of dispute since India and Pakistan were partitioned in 1947.
TOPIC
By Louis J. Cantori and Antony T. Sullivan and Louis J. Cantori and Antony T. Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 15, 2002
After almost 20 years of civil war in the Sudan - with about 2 million dead during the last 13 years from fighting or starvation - on-again, off-again peace negotiations are again under way. President Bush and especially his special envoy to the Sudan, retired Sen. John C. Danforth of Missouri, have made important contributions to this process. The momentum is such that even the capture by southern rebels of the Sudanese city of Torit on Sept. 1 - which caused the northern-based government to walk out of the talks - may only be a momentary setback.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | December 16, 1992
JERUSALEM -- The Israeli army has undertaken sweeping arrests of Islamic fundamentalists with the kidnapping and killing of an Israeli border policeman.It hopes the arrests will bolster its old foes and Hamas' chief rival, the Palestine Liberation Organization.The bound body of Nissim Toledano was found yesterday in the desert hills outside Jerusalem by a Bedouin woman searching for her camel. He had been stabbed and strangled, most likely Monday night, according to Israeli Radio.The kidnapping ended without the demanded release from an Israeli prison of the sheik who founded Hamas.
NEWS
August 7, 1997
Ulster must talk about disarmingLet's see if I've got this straight: Protestant leaders in Northern Ireland refuse to take part in peace negotiations unless the Irish Republican Army disarms first -- or at least promises to disarm.One of the major objectives of the peace negotiations is to have the IRA disarm. So Protestant and Unionist leaders demanding the objective be guaranteed before the negotiations begin is like an employee refusing to negotiate for a higher salary unless the employer grants the higher salary prior to the negotiations.
TOPIC
By Charles Glass and Charles Glass,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 14, 2002
PARIS -- The return of Secretary of State Colin L. Powell to Israel has revived language that, until now, the Bush administration has avoided: peace process, peace partner and the other words that implied America would intervene in negotiations. The United States has been forced to act, because tolerance of Israeli military assaults in the occupied territories encourages demonstrators to destabilize allied Arab regimes like those of Egypt and Jordan. This time, the Bush people should learn from the failure of the Clinton administration to bring "peace" through the "peace process."
NEWS
December 16, 2001
WHEN THE excitement of war dies down, much of the world will still be in recession, and freer trade will still be a major tool for pulling out of it. So it is a good thing that the U.S. House of Representatives has given President Bush trade promotion authority on trade deals to be negotiated in the future. It was a one-vote victory on a largely party-line vote, but approval from the Democratic Senate is expected to be easier. This reverses denial of trade promotion authority to President Clinton twice in his second term.
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