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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2010
At the age of 71, Stanley Mazaroff can look back on a rich life and can divide it into quarters. He was a pioneering Peace Corps volunteer, a successful law partner, an art student and now a published author for the second time. His book, "Henry Walters and Bernard Berenson: Collector and Connoisseur," published last month by the Johns Hopkins University Press, illuminates the often strained relationship between the Gilded Age collector and the art historian, an acknowledged expert on Italian Renaissance paintings.
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NEWS
By Pete Pichaske | March 20, 2014
When Peggy Walton returned to Ukraine six months ago, 20 years after a two-year stint as a Peace Corps volunteer, she only wanted to quell her own restlessness and satisfy her curiosity about how the country had changed.  Little did the retired Howard Community College professor know she'd wind up in the middle of a riveting international crisis that would force her to flee the country, leaving behind an unfinished job, worried Ukrainian friends...
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NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Staff Writer | July 22, 1993
Richard Gardiner stood out from most of the prospective applicants who stopped at the Peace Corps recruiting booth in the East Wing Lobby of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health yesterday.Most of the people visiting the booth were students in their 20s. Mr. Gardiner is a 50-year-old employee of the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. He said he did not feel out of place, however."I know far more than they do. At this stage in life, I have super confidence," he said.Peace Corps officials kicked off a recruiting drive in the Baltimore area yesterday morning by opening a recruiting booth at the Hopkins.
NEWS
By Theodore G. Venetoulis | November 22, 2013
There's not much left to be said about John Kennedy. I can't say I really knew him. But I did meet him a few times, and on the last occasion, he actually called me by name (good staff work, I'm sure). There weren't many Maryland politicians who backed his presidential candidacy in those early primaries. The dominant Tawes-Hocker machine opposed him. One of his most enthusiastic supporters was Jerry Hoffberger, who owned both the National Brewing Company and the Baltimore Orioles.
NEWS
August 7, 1996
Loret Ruppe, 60, the longest-serving director of the Peace Corps in its 35-year history, died yesterday of ovarian cancer at her home in Bethesda.Appointed director of the Peace Corps by President Ronald Reagan in 1981, she served eight years. She was credited by many with overseeing a revitalization of the international service organization. In 1989, she was appointed ambassador to Norway by President George Bush.She is survived by her husband, former U.S. Rep. Philip Edward Ruppe, a Michigan Republican; and five daughters.
NEWS
By Korky Vann and Korky Vann,THE HARTFORD COURANT | October 1, 2006
Forty years ago, when Lillian Carter applied to the Peace Corps, the idea of a 67-year-old woman's volunteering to serve as a public health worker in India was so unusual, the sexagenarian had to have her head examined before being accepted. The Corps requested she undergo a psychiatric evaluation. The mother of President Jimmy Carter passed the assessment and went on to become one of the Peace Corps' most famous senior volunteers. After her death in 1983, the organization established an award in her name to recognize volunteers 50 and over for outstanding service.
NEWS
April 6, 1993
Freda Irene Jones Himmelmann, who helped create training programs in the early days of the Peace Corps, died of respiratory failure Feb. 25 at the Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis. She was 78.Mrs. Himmelmann, who had lived in Maryland since 1976, devoted much of her life to fostering goodwill abroad, with the Peace Corps and the American Field Service.While living in Milwaukee in the early 1960s, she helped set up training programs for people entering the newly created Peace Corps.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | August 12, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Several weeks ago, President Clinton made the kind of news he can do without by criticizing ultraconservative radio and television talk show host Rush Limbaugh and his ilk for "a constant, unremitting drumbeat of negativism and cynicism" that clearly had gotten under his skin. That night on television and in the next day's newspapers, Clinton's gripe overshadowed all else he had done that day.In the news and political business, it's called "stepping on your own story." The president aired his complaint in a phone interview from Air Force One as it flew to St. Louis, where he was headed to mark the beginning of a "Summer of Service" by 7,000 young volunteers in pilot projects of his new national service program.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 12, 2001
ASK SUE GRIFFIN where she'll be spending the next two years, and she'll tell you Eastern Europe. Ask her why, and she'll tell you it was her destiny. "I think it chose me," Griffin, a Westminster resident, said of her decision last year to become a Peace Corps volunteer at age 59. "It was the right time of my life to enter into this phase." Since then, Griffin's life has been a sea of paperwork. She has filled out applications, set legal affairs in order, and undergone medical examinations to ensure she's healthy enough to serve in an underdeveloped area.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 8, 1992
TIRANA, Albania -- The battalions of U.S. Peace Corps recruits invading Eastern Europe these days are armed with a new kind of weaponry to combat poverty, backwardness and disease.In the place of the hoes and shovels that jeans-clad aid workers carried in the 1960s, today's button-down volunteer deployed to the post-Communist frontier is more likely equipped with an interest-rate calculator or a laptop computer.Peace Corps volunteers are helping budding entrepreneurs in Poland set up everything from bed-and-breakfast inns to mutual funds.
NEWS
November 13, 2013
I support of letter writer Claudia Diamond's idea that new lawyer applicants in Maryland should be required to perform a set number of pro bono volunteer hours before being awarded a license to practice ("Bar exam does not a lawyer make," Nov. 7) I would even go a step further. Each lawyer should be required to provide a set number of pro bono hours each year of practice as well. We currently require our graduating high school students to perform a set number of volunteer hours as a requirement of graduation.
SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2013
Andrew Boston (Loyola High) has been named head coach of the Uganda men's team as the nation works toward its international debut in next summer's Federation of International Lacrosse World Championship. Boston, who played at the University of Delaware and is now in the Peace Corps, will team with offensive coordinator Tom Schreiber of Princeton, defensive coordinator Tanner Scales of Virginia and Casey Lavallee of Hebron, Conn., an 18-year-old who will be among the youngest people ever to coach at the world games.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | August 13, 2013
While looking for a job earlier this year, Shareki Chaney, 26, kept busy by volunteering at her son's public charter school. Now Chaney has a new job as a Volunteer in Service to America. She is one of 17 AmeriCorps VISTAs who are newly assigned to community groups, schools, nonprofits and government agencies throughout Baltimore. Technically, VISTAs aren't volunteers, because they get a stipend of $13,300 for 12 months, or 105 percent of the poverty level in Baltimore. The pay isn't much, but for Chaney, it's all good.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2013
The U.S. Peace Corps will begin accepting applications from same-sex couples who wish to serve overseas together for the first time next month, the agency announced Tuesday. The move follows a broader shift by the Obama administration toward publicly supporting gay rights and denouncing LGBT discrimination globally through U.S. diplomatic efforts, including at the State Department and the United Nations. The Peace Corps said opening its doors to same-sex domestic partners "further diversifies the pool of Peace Corps applicants and the skills of those invited to serve overseas in the fields of education, health, community economic development, environment, youth in development and agriculture.
NEWS
January 31, 2012
I found the recent headline regarding to Maryland National Guard ("Maryland Guard fights on in hope of Afghan peace," Jan. 29) to be Orwellian. It is a simple dictum that you can't wage war for peace. There are no winners in a war, only losers. One side may kill more than the other or capture more territory, but a cessation of warfare is not peace. I was a Peace Corps volunteer in Botswana helping to set up small business. It would have been ludicrous for me to use force on the entrepreneurs to get them to do what I wanted.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 20, 2012
Robert W. "Bob" Roche, a former Peace Corps volunteer who later worked in Africa with Catholic Relief Services, died Jan. 12 of undetermined causes at Sanctuary at Holy Cross, a Burtonsville senior living community. The Columbia resident was 61. "We are awaiting the results of an autopsy as to the cause of death," said his son, Robert L. Roche, who lives in Washington. Robert Winslow "Bob" Roche was born and raised in Monroeville, Pa., where he graduated in 1968 from Gateway Senior High School.
NEWS
November 19, 2002
Peter Wall, a retired Westinghouse logistics engineer who served in the Peace Corps, died Thursday at York Hospital in Pennsylvania of complications from heart surgery. He was 67 and lived in Shrewsbury, Pa. Born and raised in Clinton, Conn., Mr. Wall attended Syracuse University before enlisting in the Army and serving in Germany in the 1950s. He joined the Peace Corps in 1962, and served for two years in Ecuador. He then went to work for Westinghouse Electric Corp. in San Diego and moved to Maryland in 1967.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2012
Eugenia A. "Genie" Kennedy, a former Peace Corps volunteer and teacher, died Jan. 7 of multiple organ failure at her Bel Air home. She was 82. A daughter of a businessman and a homemaker, Sarah Eugenia Asbury, who did not use her first name, was born and raised in Delta, Pa. After graduating from Delta High School in 1947, she earned a bachelor's degree in business education in 1951 from Russell Sage College in upstate New York....
NEWS
By Roberto Loiederman | March 21, 2011
What if you get a message on Facebook from someone you knew many years ago — someone you haven't had any contact with in all that time? And what if you have no desire to connect with that person? What do you do? Those questions came up for me in the last few days. But I wasn't the person who received the Facebook message. I was the one who sent it. The man from my past I tried to connect with has a common name, but I had no doubt that I was sending the message to the right person.
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