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Peace Conference

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By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 17, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush called Jordan's King Hussein to personally urge him to take part in a Middle East peace conference in what the White House described yesterday as Mr. Bush's first contact since the Arab monarch sided with Iraq during the Persian Gulf war.The conversation Wednesday afternoon also represented the first time Mr. Bush has injected himself personally into a campaign led by Secretary of State James A. Baker III to build on wartime relations...
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NEWS
January 23, 2014
Commentator Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. trots out New York Sen. Chuck Schumer's opposition to the president's Iran policy as the latest on why the Obama administration is wrong on everything else ( "Schumer's Iran-deal criticism is rare break with Obama," Jan. 19). Mr. Ehrlich forgot to mention that Senator Schumer's co-sponsor on tougher Iran sanctions was none other than fellow Democrat Sen. Robert Menendez of New Jersey, chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. It's not unusual for Democrats to embrace a broad spectrum of opinion - unlike Republicans, who expect everyone in their party to act in lock step, as was the case in their repeated efforts to block the Affordable Care Act. The Menendez-Schumer effort will likely fail, as it should.
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 22, 1991
JIDDAH, Saudi Arabia -- Secretary of State James A. Baker III received conflicting signals about a Middle East peace conference yesterday, as Saudi Arabia said it would not attend, Egypt announced its support and Israel postponed a decision on participating.Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal confirmed Mr. Baker's prediction Saturday that the kingdom would not join in a peace conference because it should be limited to Israel and the Arab nations on the Jewish state's border."Participation in the meeting traditionally has been [limited to]
NEWS
September 12, 2013
I appreciate the attention The Sun has devoted to President Barack Obama's plan to attack Syria - articles, letters and commentaries. There is little debate, though, as the vast majority of the people oppose this counter-productive strategy. I despise the tyranny of Bashar Assad's government, but he should be isolated and eventually brought to justice. He will not suffer from a U.S. attack, but Syrian people are sure to experience death and destruction. As the peace movement protests President Obama's potentially reckless plunge into the abyss, some elected officials are ignoring the voices of the people.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | April 21, 1991
JERUSALEM -- Palestinian leaders expressed "cautious optimism" yesterday after talks with Secretary of State James A. Baker III about plans for a regional peace conference that is becoming a source of tension between the United States and Israel.The Palestinians said the latest talks, the third session within the last five weeks, were the first to explore in detail the role and makeup of a Palestinian delegation to a peace conference, the format for which is being revised continually by the United States.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 2, 1991
LISBON, Portugal -- Secretary of State James A. Baker III gave Syria a new U.S. proposal for the shape of an Arab-Israeli peace conference yesterday, marking a new attempt by the Bush administration to revive its stalled Middle East peace initiative.Mr. Baker handed a letter from President Bush to Syrian Foreign Minister Farouk al-Sharaa and asked him to carry the message to Syria's President Hafez el Assad.Mr. Baker, who met with Mr. al-Sharaa for two hours at a hotel here, said it was "a detailed letter" that he wanted to outline "face to face."
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 4, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Struggling to bridge a gap between Israel and Syria on procedures for a peace conference, the United States has proposed allowing United Nations and European Community observers to participate and given Israel effective veto on reconvening the full conference.The United States also has proposed that documents resulting from any negotiations be turned over to the United Nations, diplomatic sources said yesterday.In an effort to restore momentum to the process, President Bush sent letters last weekend to Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, Syrian President Hafez el Assad, King Fahd of Saudi Arabia and President Hosni Mubarak of Egypt.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 9, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Secretary of State James A. Baker III, racing against a self-imposed deadline three weeks away, embarks Saturday on his eighth trip to the Middle East in seven months in an effort to get Israel and the Arabs to the bargaining table by the end of the month, the State Department announced yesterday.Mr. Baker's mission is expected to overlap slightly with a trip to the region by Soviet Foreign Minister Boris D. Pankin that also is intended to spur the peace process, although there are no announced plans for the two to meet.
NEWS
By Jimmy Carter | January 9, 1991
LINKED" or not, there is no way to separate the crisis in the Persian Gulf from the Israeli-Palestinian question. Following a settlement with Iraq, either through peace or war, ever greater pressure will emerge within the international community to convene a peace conference.United Nations resolutions on the Middle East, from four decades ago to the present, have been given a new vitality and will not go away again.Now is a propitious time for Israel to come forward with a genuine peace initiative, and President Bush and congressional leaders should do everything possible to encourage such a move.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Jerusalem Bureau of The Sun | April 20, 1991
JERUSALEM -- U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Israeli leaders reached at least a temporary impasse yesterday in talks for organizing a regional peace conference, dissipating an air of optimism from their sessions last week.Mr. Baker, in his third visit here within the last five weeks, met again with Foreign Minister David Levy and in a separate meeting with Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, but indicated that there were disagreements blocking further progress.Margaret Tutwiler, the State Department spokeswoman, said Mr. Shamir asked for time to formulate a response to U.S. proposals for narrowing the differences between Israeli and Arab conditions for a peace conference.
NEWS
August 14, 2013
As summer in Maryland begins to fade, I can't help but think about the millions of children and young adults returning to school. I know how fortunate we are to live in a land of relative peace and opportunity, especially for our children's sake. In stark contrast is Syria, a nation beset by a violent conflict that has left millions of Syrian children displaced, homeless, or worse, unable to attain anything close to opportunity. The war in Syria is nearing its three-year mark, having claimed 100,000 lives and forced millions from their homes.
NEWS
By Ken Ellingwood and Ken Ellingwood,Los Angeles Times | December 25, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Meeting for the second time this month as part of a new U.S.-influenced peace effort, Israeli and Palestinian negotiators bogged down again yesterday over familiar issues: proposed Israeli construction in areas that the Palestinians claim for a future state and Israel's demand that the Palestinians crack down on armed groups. The two sides have made no apparent progress since President Bush convened the peace conference last month in an effort to revive serious peace talks between Israel and the Palestinians.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Nitkin and David Wood and David Nitkin,Sun reporters | November 29, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Israeli and Palestinian diplomats, somberly acknowledging the hard work before them, headed back to the Middle East yesterday to see whether they can capitalize on fresh momentum from the Annapolis peace conference. But Israeli and Arab officials privately expressed skepticism about the outcome of yet another attempt to reach agreement on divisive issues that have more often caused the exchange of bullets and bombs than diplomatic accords. "I wish you all the best," President Bush, flanked by Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, said yesterday in a brief Rose Garden statement.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | November 29, 2007
Historic. Picturesque. Quaint. Charming. The chattering classes that descended on Annapolis for the Middle East peace conference relied on such doting adjectives as much as video images of the choppy Severn River and giant trees in full fall splendor. Reporters around the world gushed in the run-up to Tuesday's talks about the brick roads of the state's colonial capital, its colorful 300-year-old rowhouses and celebrated status in sailing circles. For anyone unfamiliar with the terrain, it might have seemed plucked from a children's storybook.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | November 28, 2007
An infrequent visitor to Annapolis, strolling past the storefronts of downtown yesterday, wouldn't have noticed. The stench of exhaust and the low roar of midday traffic had been replaced by unfamiliar sounds and smells - the odor of fresh pine boughs wrapped around lampposts and of fabric softener from the vent of a hot clothes dryer. Only the tinkle of an unseen wind chime or the drone of an occasional passing car broke the eerie near-silence. The Middle East peace conference at the U.S. Naval Academy, which drew delegates from 50 countries and organizations and hundreds of journalists and protesters to Annapolis, had driven away just about everyone else.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and M. William Salganik and Andrew A. Green and M. William Salganik,Sun reporters | November 28, 2007
Amid all the pressure of yesterday's Annapolis peace conference, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Olmert could count on seeing at least one friendly face: Gov. Martin O'Malley. Maryland and Israel have long fostered economic and civic ties, but the bond these days is a little more personal. The governor and the prime minister first became acquainted at a 2001 meeting about CitiStat when they were mayors, of Baltimore and Jerusalem, respectively. In 2005, after dinner in Jerusalem, Olmert clapped then-Mayor O'Malley on the shoulder and said he hoped he would be able to visit him soon in the Maryland governor's mansion.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 16, 1991
...C WASHINGTON -- Secretary of State James A. Baker III returns to the Middle East this week to try to maintain the momentum for a peace conference leading to direct Arab-Israeli and Israeli-Palestinian talks.President Bush and Mr. Baker "are convinced that all parties are taking a serious approach to peace in the Middle East," State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler said yesterday.While Arabs and Israelis have endorsed the idea of a peace conference that would include the United States and the Soviet Union, perhaps as co-sponsors, neither details of the conference nor the crucial issue of who would represent Palestinians has been worked out.Mr.
NEWS
By Jeffrey Fleishman and Jeffrey Fleishman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 17, 2007
CAIRO, Egypt -- Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice received measured support from Egypt yesterday for an Israeli-Palestinian peace conference despite widespread doubts in the Middle East that it will result in a lasting deal or improve security in the region. Rice's trip to Cairo was a diplomatic effort to convince Arab capitals to attend the Bush administration's summit, which has no official date but is expected to take place before year's end in Annapolis; Israeli officials have said it is expected to begin Nov. 26. Egypt has been skeptical of the idea for weeks, but after meeting with Rice, Egyptian Foreign Minister Ahmed Aboul Gheit told a news conference that he backed the plan.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Nitkin and David Wood and David Nitkin,Sun reporters | November 27, 2007
WASHINGTON -- With a rhetorical nod toward "a more hopeful vision" of freedom and prosperity in the Middle East, President Bush opened a peace conference last night aimed at spurring a comprehensive agreement between Israel and the Palestinians. "We share a common goal - two democratic states, Israel and Palestine, living side by side in peace and security," Bush told conference participants on the eve of today's daylong session at the U.S. Naval Academy campus in Annapolis. Achieving peace "requires difficult compromises," he said at a State Department dinner.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,SUN REPORTER | November 27, 2007
At least five groups with divergent agendas are expected to stage protests or peace rallies today in Annapolis as Middle East leaders meet on the grounds of the U.S. Naval Academy. Shalom International, which vehemently opposes any talks between Israelis and Palestinians, and Americans For a Safe Israel have obtained permits from the city to protest. Another group, Neturei Karta International, which bills itself as an anti-Zionism organization, also plans to protest. Annapolis police said there was no way to be sure how many protesters or peace demonstrators will show up today.
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