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NEWS
By Laurie Goering and Laurie Goering,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 26, 2004
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia -- African nations, long reluctant to intervene in each other's crises, launched a new continent-wide security council yesterday with powers to send African peacekeeping troops to conflict zones. The new African Union Peace and Security Council, formed on the model of the United Nations Security Council, follows a string of failed pan-African peace efforts since the 1970s. But Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo, a member of the new council, promised this one would be different because "we have learned from our own experience that peace, security and stability are necessary for sustainable development."
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NEWS
By Ashraf Khalil and Ashraf Khalil,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 5, 2007
JERUSALEM -- Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice returned to Israel yesterday for the third time in six weeks, seeking to nudge the Israeli and Palestinian sides closer together in advance of a U.S.-sponsored peace conference. But Rice, after a day of meetings with Israeli officials, including Prime Minister Ehud Olmert, acknowledged that her two-day visit is unlikely to produce agreement on a hoped-for joint pre-conference statement of mutual goals. "They're still working. And like with anything of this kind, you know, they're going through some knotty discussions," Rice said.
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NEWS
By JEANE KIRKPATRICK | December 8, 1992
George Bush's decision to offer -- through the United Nations -- a division of U.S. combat troops and support elements to relieve famine in Somalia made a good many people uncomfortable for very different reasons.Some Africans worried aloud that a U.N. intervention would turn out to be a facade for a new kind of colonialism. Some Somalis, always suspicious of Egypt, believe the proposed aid is a ruse on the part of the U.N.'s Egyptian secretary general, Boutros Boutros-Ghali. Some Europeans worry that it is one more case of the U.S. manipulating the U.N. to serve American foreign-policy objectives.
NEWS
By Laurie Goering and Laurie Goering,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 26, 2004
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia -- African nations, long reluctant to intervene in each other's crises, launched a new continent-wide security council yesterday with powers to send African peacekeeping troops to conflict zones. The new African Union Peace and Security Council, formed on the model of the United Nations Security Council, follows a string of failed pan-African peace efforts since the 1970s. But Nigerian President Olusegun Obasanjo, a member of the new council, promised this one would be different because "we have learned from our own experience that peace, security and stability are necessary for sustainable development."
NEWS
November 22, 1998
FITFULLY, the peace initiative between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization has regained momentum.Israeli troops have begun withdrawals. Prisoners have been released. Gaza International Airport was to open today. Negotiations on final status of territory, which will likely include Palestinian statehood, have resumed in good faith -- however impossible the May 4 deadline appears. But Israelis still distrust the intentions of Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat, and Palestinians equally suspect the worst of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
NEWS
By JEANE KIRKPATRICK | May 24, 1994
Washington.--The Washington Post-ABC poll released last week confirmed that public confidence in President Clinton's handling of our foreign affairs has declined sharply, with only 40 percent approving and a bare 13 percent saying they feel the President has a clear foreign policy. Confidence will decline further if Mr. Clinton acts on his repeated threats of military intervention in Haiti.Granted, the threats are not entirely clear: ''Given how many people are being killed and the abject misery of the Haitian people . . . [he has said]
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 20, 2002
President Bush formally asked Congress yesterday for broad authorization to "use all means," including force, to disarm and topple Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, regardless of whether the United Nations supports such action. "If you want to keep the peace, you've got to have the authorization to use force," Bush said yesterday after he sent Congress a proposed resolution that administration officials said aims to give him the "maximum flexibility" he would need to take action in Iraq.
NEWS
June 8, 1993
The peace-keeping operation in Somalia breaks new ground for the United Nations. Instead of merely policing an agreement, it authorizes troops to do whatever is necessary to maintain peace, disarm combatants and protect relief workers. It provides readier rules of engagement than any previous operation, based on Chapter 7 of the U.N. Charter authorizing force when international peace and security are threatened.That this would be challenged by one Somali warlord or another was always likely.
NEWS
February 21, 1991
Whether Saddam Hussein remains in power in Iraq or is removed along with his militaristic regime has emerged in this showdown war week as a seeming difference between the United States and the Soviet Union.President Bush has made it clear he wants the Iraqi dictator deposed even though this is not a specific war aim bearing the imprimatur of the Security Council. Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's heralded peace plan reputedly would permit Saddam Hussein's survival for the moment, perhaps even in a situation where his country would be spared the reparation payments it surely owes Kuwait and Saudi Arabia.
NEWS
By Debra DeLee | June 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - Political developments in the Middle East reflect the central role that President Bush needs to play if there is to be any progress in ending Israeli-Palestinian violence and renewing peace negotiations If Mr. Bush is sincerely interested in finally making a sustained contribution to ending this struggle, this week's peace summits in Jordan and Egypt will give him significant opportunities to flex his diplomatic muscles and demonstrate his...
NEWS
By Kathy Lally | June 5, 2003
The months and years ahead will tell whether the statements made yesterday in Aqaba, Jordan, were the beginnings of historic peace in the Middle East or diplomatic words surrounding yet another false start. The words, promising words all, were uttered after meetings between Palestinian Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas and Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon, along with President Bush. Their host was King Abdullah of Jordan. Following are excerpts from their closing remarks: KING ABDULLAH: Mr. President, prime ministers, let us have ambitions - ambitions to move beyond the violence and occupation to the day when two states, Palestine and Israel, can live together, side by side, in peace and security.
NEWS
By Debra DeLee | June 3, 2003
WASHINGTON - Political developments in the Middle East reflect the central role that President Bush needs to play if there is to be any progress in ending Israeli-Palestinian violence and renewing peace negotiations If Mr. Bush is sincerely interested in finally making a sustained contribution to ending this struggle, this week's peace summits in Jordan and Egypt will give him significant opportunities to flex his diplomatic muscles and demonstrate his...
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 20, 2002
President Bush formally asked Congress yesterday for broad authorization to "use all means," including force, to disarm and topple Iraqi President Saddam Hussein, regardless of whether the United Nations supports such action. "If you want to keep the peace, you've got to have the authorization to use force," Bush said yesterday after he sent Congress a proposed resolution that administration officials said aims to give him the "maximum flexibility" he would need to take action in Iraq.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 26, 2002
WASHINGTON - U.S. troops will soon begin training recruits for a new Afghan army, with the goal of boosting security and safeguarding Afghanistan's borders, Pentagon officials said yesterday. The mission will be led by Army Green Beret troops who will start the training in late spring, officials said. They said the U.S. troops would use a series of 10-week training cycles to create a projected total of 2,400 Afghan soldiers. "Training the Afghan army will serve as a positive step to help ensure that there is a better chance for peace and security in Afghanistan and that the country is not used as a terrorist haven in the future," Gen. Richard B. Myers, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, said yesterday.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 4, 2002
WASHINGTON - For the first time in a decade, the United Nations Security Council now includes a strident voice for Arab nationalism, one that could complicate U.S. efforts to tighten pressure on Iraq and wage a global war on terrorism. Syria, which will join the council today for the year's first consultations, has long been on America's list of state sponsors of terrorism and, U.S. critics say, is blatantly violating U.N. sanctions against Baghdad by importing Iraqi oil. Though hopes for moderation were raised when Bashar al-Assad succeeded his late father, Hafez al-Assad, as president in 2000, Syria remains hostile to one of America's closest allies, Israel.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 8, 2001
JERUSALEM - Fresh from his landslide victory, Israeli Prime Minister-elect Ariel Sharon set about trying to convince a skeptical world that he won't plunge the Middle East into worse violence, dispatching advisers to Washington and Jordan, and publicizing what an aide called a "very warm" letter from Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat. But Sharon also signaled anew his refusal to share sovereignty over Jerusalem with the Palestinians by visiting the Western Wall, Judaism's holiest shrine and part of the base of the Temple Mount.
NEWS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | September 3, 1997
She remembers it was 2 p.m. on Sept. 3 when a taxi delivered the yellow telegram to her door in New Jersey. Teresa Durkin RTC expected it to be from her brother in the military, needing a ride to another air base. Instead, it was from the Air Force, and it started with five awful words: "It is with deep regret "That was 39 years ago, and yesterday the federal government finally recognized the sacrifice of her late brother -- Master Sgt. George P. Petrochilos -- and dozens of other airmen who died in some of the most secret service of the Cold War.The National Security Agency unveiled the National Vigilance Park and Aerial Reconnaissance Memorial at its headquarters near Fort Meade.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 11, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The United Nations Security Council moved toward passage last night of a U.S.-backed resolution condemning Israel for the police shootings that killed 19 Palestinians Monday, but negotiations continued over the wording.The United States pressed for quick action on a resolution strong enough to prevent any weakening of the coalition arrayed against Iraq, but one that would not be so hostile to Israel as to require a U.S. veto.U.S. officials privately accused the Palestine Liberation Organization, working through Yemen, Cuba and Malaysia, of trying to score a propaganda victory by maneuvering for a U.S. veto, which would drive a wedge between the United States and many of its allies in the Persian Gulf crisis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Craig Eisendrath and Craig Eisendrath,Special to the Sun | March 19, 2000
"Deliver Us From Evil: Peacekeepers, Warlords and a World of Endless Conflict," by William Shawcross. Simon and Schuster. 416 pages. $27.50. Since the Cold War ended, the United States, secure as the world's only superpower, has slowly sunk into a complacent isolationism. William Shawcross' "Deliver Us From Evil" comes as a poignant reminder that, during this same period, millions of people have been killed, starved, mutilated or displaced in conflicts that have ranged from the former Yugoslavia to Rwanda to Iraq, Cambodia and Indonesia.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 5, 1999
JERUSALEM -- With officials of the United States, Egypt and Jordan at their sides, Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat signed yesterday the latest agreement of the Middle East peace process and set off on a new path toward resolving the decades-old conflict that has divided their peoples.The signing ceremony in the Egyptian resort town of Sharm el Sheikh represents the resumption of a peace process that has been deadlocked for eight months. It signals a change in the relationship between the parties, from contentious adversaries to respectful negotiators.
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