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By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 6, 1997
JERUSALEM -- In the wake of the latest terrorist bombing in Jerusalem, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu declared yesterday that he is no longer bound by peace accords and said he will withhold returning land to the Palestinians until he feels that Yasser Arafat has cracked down on terrorism."
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 1, 2008
2 JERUSALEM - Israeli and Palestinian officials yesterday played down the prospect of any immediate peace agreement as Ehud Olmert, the discredited prime minister of Israel, begins his final phase in office. Mark Regev, a spokesman for Olmert, noted "considerable gaps" in the negotiating positions and said it was unrealistic to expect to resolve all the issues on the table "in the next two or three weeks." Olmert met here yesterday with the Palestinian president, Mahmoud Abbas, and the newspaper Haaretz reported that Olmert had been pressing Abbas to agree to a joint document of principles before Olmert is replaced as leader of his Kadima Party in an election scheduled Sept.
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NEWS
By Hugh Dellios and Hugh Dellios,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 9, 2003
COMALAPA, Guatemala - From behind bolted doors after dark, Vidalia Chali places blame for Guatemala's crippling climate of violence in an unusual place: the 1996 peace accords that ended the nation's civil war. "The criminals are taking advantage of the peace," said the peasant woman, 33, holding her 3-year-old daughter. "People say that since there is peace, the police can't do anything to them." That belief explains why Chali and others may be tempted to vote in today's presidential election for the firm hand of former dictator Efrain Rios Montt, even in this valley where 108 massacre victims were exhumed this year from mass graves, many of them dating to Rios Montt's rule in the early 1980s.
NEWS
By Tanya Snyder | January 11, 2007
The issue of immigration shook up the country and bedeviled Congress last year, but rarely do we examine the root causes of immigration. Consider El Salvador, which sends more people per capita to the United States than any other country. Up to a third of its population lives outside its borders, most in the United States, and its economy is supported by money those immigrants send back to their families. Even now, almost 15 years to the day after the end of the nation's civil war, people are fleeing for their lives - and their livelihoods - because the once-heralded peace accords have failed to bring peace.
NEWS
By Rick Rockwell | November 8, 1998
POLITICAL intrigue, media manipulation, murder and sex sound like the ingredients for a successful film. Instead, they are the legacy of U.S. policy in Guatemala. Obscuring the past has become part of the political culture the United States has helped to create in that Central American nation.In 1954, the CIA secretly engineered a successful coup that displaced what the Eisenhower administration considered to be a destabilizing left-wing government in Guatemala. The coup also effectively eliminated Guatemala's political moderates, setting the stage for a civil war that lasted 35 years.
NEWS
By Tanya Snyder | January 11, 2007
The issue of immigration shook up the country and bedeviled Congress last year, but rarely do we examine the root causes of immigration. Consider El Salvador, which sends more people per capita to the United States than any other country. Up to a third of its population lives outside its borders, most in the United States, and its economy is supported by money those immigrants send back to their families. Even now, almost 15 years to the day after the end of the nation's civil war, people are fleeing for their lives - and their livelihoods - because the once-heralded peace accords have failed to bring peace.
NEWS
November 22, 1998
FITFULLY, the peace initiative between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization has regained momentum.Israeli troops have begun withdrawals. Prisoners have been released. Gaza International Airport was to open today. Negotiations on final status of territory, which will likely include Palestinian statehood, have resumed in good faith -- however impossible the May 4 deadline appears. But Israelis still distrust the intentions of Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat, and Palestinians equally suspect the worst of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 31, 1998
BIJELJINA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright waded into Bosnia's crucial national election campaign yesterday, working both overtly and behind the scenes to promote candidates who pledge to rebuild the Balkan nation torn apart by 3 1/2 years of war and divided since by lingering ethnic hatreds.Although elections have been held in Bosnia since the fighting ended in late 1995, the coming vote -- scheduled for Sept. 13-14 -- will mark the first time that ethnic Croats and Serbs have had a genuine choice between candidates.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 10, 1997
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- The United States will supply Bosnia's Muslim-Croat Federation with more than 100 heavy-artillery cannons, officials said yesterday, sharply escalating that army's potential firepower.The weapons are part of a $100-million train-and-equip program for the Muslim-Croat army, sponsored by Washington and heavily criticized by European allies.James Pardew, the U.S. diplomat in charge of the program, said at a Sarajevo news conference that 116 155-millimeter howitzers will be sent to federation forces, which until now had six. An additional 51 slightly smaller howitzers will be manufactured locally with U.S. help.
NEWS
By HAIM GORDON | November 9, 1993
Beer Sheva, Israel.--On the Israeli army plane that took Yitzhak Rabin to Washington to sign the peace accords with the PLO were three widows of Israelis killed by PLO terrorists. Two weeks later, on the plane taking Yasser Arafat to Beijing, to gain Chinese support for the peace accord was Um Jihad, the widow of Abu Jihad, Mr. Arafat's deputy who was killed in Tunis by Israeli commandos.Evidently, both Mr. Rabin and Mr. Arafat felt that support from women whose husbands were murdered by the other side would make the peace accords more palatable to some of the skeptics.
NEWS
November 5, 2004
FOR NEARLY 40 years, Yasser Arafat has epitomized the Palestinian struggle for independence in word and deed. In his signature black-and-white Arab headdress and military fatigues, he was the grizzled guerrilla fighter whose campaign of terror against Israel led him to the signing of a historic peace treaty with the Jewish state - only to see it and his dream of an independent homeland dissolve in a resumption of violence by Palestinian militants....
NEWS
By Hugh Dellios and Hugh Dellios,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 9, 2003
COMALAPA, Guatemala - From behind bolted doors after dark, Vidalia Chali places blame for Guatemala's crippling climate of violence in an unusual place: the 1996 peace accords that ended the nation's civil war. "The criminals are taking advantage of the peace," said the peasant woman, 33, holding her 3-year-old daughter. "People say that since there is peace, the police can't do anything to them." That belief explains why Chali and others may be tempted to vote in today's presidential election for the firm hand of former dictator Efrain Rios Montt, even in this valley where 108 massacre victims were exhumed this year from mass graves, many of them dating to Rios Montt's rule in the early 1980s.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | September 22, 2002
JERUSALEM -- Two years after the fight between Palestinians and Israelis began hurtling to an unprecedented level of violence, the cost to both sides has been enormous and the hope of ever restoring a peace process seems to have disappeared. The death toll has reached the proportions of a full-scale war. More than 2,100 people have been killed since the uprising the Palestinians call the Al Aqsa Intifada began late September 2000. That includes more than 1,500 Palestinians and almost 600 Israelis.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 4, 2002
A peace pact signed in Africa last week generated cheers at a Carroll County-based charity where officials hope to extend their medical aid to areas that have gone years without a doctor's services. Besides enabling volunteers to travel more safely, the agreement between leaders of Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo could help Interchurch Medical Assistance raise money for its aid programs, an official at the charity said. "Peace will make a huge difference," said Dan Metzel, grants manager for the group, which is using a $25 million federal grant to re-establish Congo's health care system.
NEWS
By Richard C. Gross | February 21, 2002
THE 16-MONTH war of attrition between Israel and the Palestinians -- a tit-for-tatting that is tick-tocking its way toward certain catastrophe -- is as senseless, as wasteful and as futile as the dying on both sides. Neither Israeli nor Palestinian will give in unless forced from the outside. History written in a lot of spilled blood has proved that. For the majority of Palestinians, Israel is the Goliath hungering for their land, hunkering over it with tanks and planes armed with missiles followed by those with bulldozers who would plant settlements and pave roads.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 6, 1999
JERUSALEM -- Minutes after Israel's Cabinet approved the latest Mideast peace agreement with the Palestinians, bombs exploded in two Israeli cities yesterday and killed three suspected terrorists, police said.Israeli and Palestinian officials condemned the bombings and vowed to push ahead with the Middle East peace process that got a boost Saturday when the two sides agreed to a new timetable to solve the main issues dividing them.In the first bombing, an explosive-laden car blew up about 5 p.m. in the Israeli resort town of Tiberias on the Sea of Galilee, Israel radio reported.
NEWS
October 25, 1998
WHEN THE DAWN broke Friday over the Wye River on Maryland's Eastern Shore, Israeli and Palestinian marathon negotiators, with considerable prodding from President Clinton, appeared to have found a way to restart the Oslo peace process.Moments later, everything was on hold.A last-minute dispute had developed over an Israeli demand that the settlement be linked to U.S. release of Jonathan Pollard, a former Navy intelligence analyst jailed for spying for the Israelis.This extraneous snag illustrated the delicate nature of Middle East accords.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 31, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In the wake of Israeli plans to build new roads in the West Bank, President Clinton and Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak yesterday urged Israel's new hard-line government to honor its peace accords with the Palestinians.Neither leader appeared anxious for immediate confrontation with Israel's conservative Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, but both indicated that the proposed road construction could complicate, if not derail, the peace process.Clinton stressed that the plans to build two roads in the West Bank and widen two bridges to the Golan Heights were put forward not by the new government but by one of its ministers, Ariel Sharon, a right-wing hawk and former defense chief who is now the minister of national infrastructure.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 15, 1999
BELFAST, Northern Ireland -- Ulster's main Protestant party said last night that it would not join the political wing of the Irish Republican Army in government as scheduled today, a decision that will stall the Northern Ireland peace agreement.David Trimble, the leader of the Ulster Unionists, spurned a series of last-minute appeals and concessions from British Prime Minister Tony Blair, saying they had failed to sway his party's members from their conviction that they cannot share power with Sinn Fein as long as its IRA allies refuse to start disarming.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Tom Bowman and Jonathan Weisman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 7, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Western leaders secured Russia's backing yesterday for the broad outlines of a Kosovo peace accord, further isolating Slobodan Milosevic even though President Clinton said for the first time that he could accept the Yugoslav president as a partner in a settlement.Moscow's assent, though a victory of sorts for the West, carried a price. The agreement makes no reference to NATO soldiers in an international peacekeeping force. Previously, NATO had demanded that an armed mission in Kosovo be led by the alliance or at least include NATO troops at its "core."
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