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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
(UPDATED 5/15 WITH PROBABLE CAUSE OF DEATH) Dmitry Volkov, a promising Russian-born cellist who received an Artist Diploma from Peabody Conservatory last year, died on May 10 while visiting Baltimore. He was 26. The cause of death appears to have been a heart defect. "The preliminary word is that it was cardiac arrhythmia," said violinist Daniel Heifetz, founder of the Heifetz International Music Institute at Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Va., where Mr. Volkov had been an artist in residence.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
The Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University opens its school year this week with about 600 students, 150 faculty members and a new dean. Fred Bronstein, who started on the job in June after six years as president of the St. Louis Symphony, is the 16th person to take the helm since the music conservatory was founded in 1857. His title is different, though. The designation was changed to "dean" from "director," established before the conservatory became affiliated with JHU in 1977, to make Peabody consistent with the university's other academic divisions.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
News came overnight that John Shirley-Quirk has died in Bath, England, at the age of 82. The bass-baritone was a most eloquent singer; an especially insightful interpreter of music by Benjamin Britten; a man of great personal charm; and an inspiring teacher, who served froim 1992 to 2012 on the faculty at the Peabody Institute. I wanted to share this exquisite performance by Mr. Shirley-Quirk of a song by Ralph Vaughan Williams that, in a few short minutes, captures the essence of this vocal artist's rare gifts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
Even in a group of overachievers, Monica Lopez-Gonzalez would likely stand out. The 30-year-old native Baltimorean has two bachelor's degrees - in French and psychology - and an M.A. and Ph.D. in cognitive science, all from the Johns Hopkins University, where she recently did a stint as a postdoctoral fellow researching "the cognitive neuroscience of artistic creativity. " "The joke among my friends is that I'm such a nerd that I will get another Ph.D. so I can put 'Ph.D.²' after my name," said Lopez-Gonzalez, who currently does consulting work in the field of data visualization.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2001
Maria Morales, a glamorous Spanish dancer who taught at Peabody Institute and entertained at New York nightclubs in the 1930s and 1940s, died Sunday of congestive heart failure at her Mount Vernon home. She was 89. "She was this extraordinary flamenco and Spanish dancer," said Robert Sirota, director of the Peabody Institute, where Ms. Morales taught until three years ago. "She was irreproducible. You can't find someone with her background, culture, elegance and vibrancy. Her dancing was an expression of all those wonderful things.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 2, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer's proposed budget for fiscal 1992 includes a modest $125,000 cut in program funds for the Maryland State Arts Council and a $865,000 decrease for Maryland Public Television.The budget also includes $5.4 million for the Peabody Institute -- $3 million in operating support and $2.4 million for the conservatory'sendowment, part of a 5-year state bailout approved last year.The proposed funding for the arts council is $7.425 million, a decline of just $17,000 from its current appropriation.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN STAFF | March 24, 1997
Bargain hunters were at the Peabody Institute yesterday looking at some practically irresistible deals -- where else could you buy a Viennese-made Boesendorfer for just $58,000?It was the music school's annual piano sale, and, yes, the Boesendorfer was there, more for its good looks than for the idea that anyone would actually buy it. But the sale was, nevertheless, a pretty gleaming accumulation of grands -- some of them even halfway affordable.Every year, the Kawai piano company lends practice pianos to music schools across the country, and the next year it sells them off at more or less a wholesale price.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff Writer | August 27, 1995
As Robert Sirota discusses the future of American music conservatories, a bit of the past looks on.Mr. Sirota, who this Friday becomes director of the Peabody Institute, is having lunch at the Peabody American Grill, a hotel restaurant a short walk from the music school. Hanging on the wall, overlooking him like a protective deity, is a photograph of Ernest Hutcheson -- long-ago faculty member at the Peabody, acclaimed pianist, renowned composer and, in a sense, mentor to Mr. Sirota."My first piano teacher took lessons from Hutcheson," he says.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | August 27, 1995
The office formerly held by Melvin A. Steinberg was misstated in an article in Sunday's Arts & Entertainment section about retiring Peabody Institute Director Robert O. Pierce. Mr. Steinberg is the former Maryland lieutenant governor.The Sun regrets the error.When Robert O. Pierce was a boy in Wichita, Kan., his schoolteacher father passed on to his three sons a love for music and a style for dealing with conflict stemming from the family's Quaker faith."We never learned to resolve things by force or authority," says Mr. Pierce, 61, who is retiring Thursday after 14 years as director of the Peabody Institute.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 18, 2000
Manon Lescaut, the original Material Girl, remains one of the most beguiling figures in opera. She can be found onstage at the Peabody Institute this weekend, turning heads, acquiring possessions and hearts with dizzying speed, letting morality hit the fan. To open its season, Peabody Opera Theatre is offering a mostly effective student production of Massenet's "Manon," one of several adaptations of a rather racy, early 18th-century novel by Antoine-Francois Prevost....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2014
On Monday morning, friends of Dmitry Volkov, the talented cellist who died unexpectedly in Baltimore on May 10 at the age of 26, gathered at the Peabody Institute, where he recently earned an artist's diploma. Among those deeply affected by the loss of this promising musician is Daniel Heifetz, president and founder of Heifetz International Music Institute in Staunton, Va., where Mr. Volkov was artist in residence. On Wednesday, Mr. Heifetz will accompany the body of the cellist back to his parents in Russia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
(UPDATED 5/15 WITH PROBABLE CAUSE OF DEATH) Dmitry Volkov, a promising Russian-born cellist who received an Artist Diploma from Peabody Conservatory last year, died on May 10 while visiting Baltimore. He was 26. The cause of death appears to have been a heart defect. "The preliminary word is that it was cardiac arrhythmia," said violinist Daniel Heifetz, founder of the Heifetz International Music Institute at Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Va., where Mr. Volkov had been an artist in residence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Baltimore arts patrons Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker have donated $1 million to the Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University to establish scholarships for students of near-legendary pianist and veteran Peabody faculty artist Leon Fleisher. In a statement released Monday, Meyerhoff called the 85-year-old Fleisher "quite simply, one of the great musicians of our time," one who "attracts stellar pianistic talents to the Peabody Institute from all over the world. " The new donation follows the $1 million Meyerhoff and Becker donated in recent years to support an endowment for undergraduate piano scholarships.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
News came overnight that John Shirley-Quirk has died in Bath, England, at the age of 82. The bass-baritone was a most eloquent singer; an especially insightful interpreter of music by Benjamin Britten; a man of great personal charm; and an inspiring teacher, who served froim 1992 to 2012 on the faculty at the Peabody Institute. I wanted to share this exquisite performance by Mr. Shirley-Quirk of a song by Ralph Vaughan Williams that, in a few short minutes, captures the essence of this vocal artist's rare gifts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Fred Bronstein, president of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, will become the new head of the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University on June 1. His title will be dean, rather than the previous, longtime designation of director, in keeping with JHU's practice with its other academic divisions. "For quite some time, I was thinking I would eventually make this kind of a move," Bronstein said in a phone interview from St. Louis. "This seemed like the optimal opportunity.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Jeffrey Sharkey, who announced last May that he would not seek to renew his contract as director of the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University after seven years, will become principal of the Royal Conservatoire of Scotland next fall. He is expected to remain at Peabody through August and to help with the transition to a new director. The search for his successor is just getting underway. Sharkey, 48, will succeed John Wallace, who will retire from the Glasgow-based Conservatoire in September 2014.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2003
Workers remodeling a 19th-century rehearsal hall at the Peabody Institute have found 10 dusty jugs of moonshine in an unlocked closet, where they apparently sat for nearly 60 years. Faded labels on the bottles suggest that the hooch was the handiwork of Gustav Strube, the first conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. Strube, who came to Baltimore in 1913 and lived here until his death 40 years later at age 85, was one of Baltimore's most beloved characters. A composer, conductor, violinist and music professor known as "Papa Strube" to his students, he was locally renowned for his succulent goulash and his home-brewed beer, wine and liquor.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 7, 2000
Anyone foolish enough to think that classical music is the exclusive province of aging men and elderly, blue-haired ladies would do well to meet Tonya Robles, the newly appointed executive director of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra. The talented, energetic Robles - who is all of 29 years old - comes to the orchestra with a neatly crafted resume chock-full of diverse musical experiences. An easy choice While a voice student at Baltimore's Peabody Institute, she interned with the Baltimore Symphony's administrative staff and, almost immediately, found her professional niche.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2013
After seven years as director of the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University, Jeffrey Sharkey is stepping down. He will remain with the conservatory until a successor is named. "So much of what I hoped to accomplish I feel I have accomplished," Sharkey, 48, said Friday. "But there's an arc to a leadership position. I think that fresh eyes are always a good thing. A new burst of energy will be good for Peabody, and for me, too. " Peabody, the nation's oldest conservatory, opened in 1866.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
If you don't have a ticket to tonight's repeat of "Defiant Requiem: Verdi at Terezin" at the Peabody Institute , try using all your powers of persuasion and influence to get one, or just consider sneaking in. It's an important event. Tuesday night marked the Baltimore premiere of this "concert-drama," which traces the history of the astonishing performances of Verdi's Requiem given 16 times by prisoners at the Terezin concentration camp (the Nazi name for the place was Theresienstadt)
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