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NEWS
September 14, 1990
The fulfilment of fund-raising commitments to qualify for state aid that was legislated earlier this year saves the Peabody Institute, at least for this round of several years, and puts it in a stronger position to face the challenges of the late Nineties. A large sigh of relief is in order. One of the nation's finest conservatories of music really might have died. And it really didn't.Although the requirement of raising $15 million in five-year pledges by Sept. 15 seemed an impossibility for the midsummer, in a regional business recession, it was met. That the Johns Hopkins University trustees committed their unrestricted endowment to make up what was missing, on the order of $2.7 million, shows their faith that this won't be needed.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
The last weekend of September could not have been much more caloric, musically speaking, without actually clogging arteries. While the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra was reveling in the high romanticism of Rachmaninoff and Korngold ( my review was posted earlier ), the Peabody Symphony Orchestra gorged on hefty emotional outpouring by Brahms and Tchaikovsky. I rather enjoyed both lyrical feasts. On Saturday night, Hajime Teri Murai, director of orchestral activities at Peabody for more than two decades, got the conservatory's 2014-2015 concert series rocking with a crisp, jazzy little curtain raiser, Shafer Mahoney's "Sparkle.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | April 3, 1997
Anniversaries exist as much to regenerate what's valuable about the past as to remember it. That's why the Peabody Symphony Orchestra is celebrating 100 years of performances with Mahler's mighty Symphony No. 2 (the "Resurrection"). This gigantic, 80-minute work is the piece in which Mahler tried to outdo Beethoven's Ninth and nearly succeeded. It traces a trajectory of life and death through a graphic musical depiction of the Last Judgment and Resurrection. After all, what could be better than the past 100 years of the Peabody Symphony than the next 100?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
The Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University opens its school year this week with about 600 students, 150 faculty members and a new dean. Fred Bronstein, who started on the job in June after six years as president of the St. Louis Symphony, is the 16th person to take the helm since the music conservatory was founded in 1857. His title is different, though. The designation was changed to "dean" from "director," established before the conservatory became affiliated with JHU in 1977, to make Peabody consistent with the university's other academic divisions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Keys | February 17, 2000
Enjoy two evenings of classical music. Members of the Peabody Preparatory Faculty will present a recital tonight that includes Dussek's "Sonata for Harp," performed by harpist Michaela Trnkova, and Poulenc's "Sonata," performed by David Drosinos and Bradley Permenter. The program will also feature work by Mozart, Claude Debussy, Astor Piazzola, Katherine Hoover and Jennifer Higdon. Return Saturday when Peabody Camerata, conducted by Gene Young, will perform Anton von Webern's "Five Pieces for Small Orchestra, Op. 10" and John Cage's "Suite for Toy Piano."
FEATURES
November 13, 1994
The Peabody Opera Theatre and the Peabody Symphony Orchestra will present the Haydn opera "The Perils of Fidelity," at 8:15 p.m. Friday and Saturday and at 3 p.m. Nov. 20 in the Miriam Friedberg Concert Hall.Although rarely performed, this Haydn opera is considered to be a masterwork. It is set in a mythical country ravaged by a sea monster that can only be placated by the sacrifice of a faithful pair of lovers. Naturally, as monster-feeding time approaches, even the most constant of couples take pains to conceal their love.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | March 31, 1995
"Normandy: the Great Crusade," a television documentary by the Maryland-based cable network the Discovery Channel, was among 31 winners of the prestigious 1994 Peabody Awards announced yesterday.Judged and selected by the University of Georgia's Henry W. Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communications, the coveted Peabodys are awarded annually for excellence in radio or television.The award was the second in a row for the Discovery Network, which has headquarters in Bethesda.Last year, it and sister network the Learning Channel were cited jointly for general achievement.
NEWS
November 17, 1993
With the meeting of the National Guild of Community Schools of the Arts in Baltimore this week, educators come face to face with one of the crueler ironies facing the city's public schools.Recently the Peabody Prep Outreach Program, which sends talented music and arts teachers into the public schools to work with the city's most disadvantaged children, was named by the guild as a national model for such efforts. So far so good. But the program, which depends on private and foundation support, is so strapped for cash this year that it has not been able to expand beyond the two schools, Tench Tilghman and Ashburton elementary schools, where it is now in place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith Green | April 9, 1998
Theodora Hanslowe, whose friends call her Teddy, returns Tuesday to her alma mater, Peabody Conservatory of Music, for a preview of her New York recital debut.Hanslowe, an award-winning mezzo, made her Metropolitan Opera debut in 1994 as Rosina in "The Barber of Seville."For her Weill Recital Hall program later this spring, she has chosen songs by Henry Purcell, Arnold Schoenberg, Francis Poulenc and George Gershwin, and the second cycle of "Liederkreis" to poems of Joseph Eichendorff by Robert Schumann.
NEWS
May 14, 1995
George Peabody, who founded Peabody Institute 137 years ago as the first school of its type in America, believed the purpose of a music conservatory was not only to train artists but to teach ordinary people the values embodied in great music.Robert Sirota, a fine American composer, conductor and educator who was named to head the Peabody after current director Robert Pierce retires this summer, is just the sort of musical humanist the founder had in mind.The traditional pattern of a conservatory education, in which students concentrated on courses in theory, harmony and ear-training and spent most of their time locked up in soundproof practice rooms, is rapidly changing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Michael Hersch composes music of sobering complexity -- lots of jagged melodic lines, thorny harmonies, quick-shifting rhythms. But even at its densest, his intense work communicates in a way that can make a listener feel privy to Hersch's innermost thoughts. The composer, who studied at the Peabody Institute in the 1990s and has been on the composition faculty there since 2006, is about to reveal even more of himself this week when his first work for the stage premieres at the Brooklyn Academy of Music.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
Among those most deeply affected by the death of cellist Dmitry Volkov were his colleagues in the award-winning Russia Trio -- pianist Katherine Harris Rick and violinist Nikita Borisevich. At Monday's memorial held at the Peabody Conservatory, where Mr. Volkov and the other trio members did graduate studies, Ms Rick delivered these touching remarks about her friend: I remember very vividly the first time I met Dmitry. I had heard the buzz about his incredible playing that went around when he first arrived on campus, so when I received a call from him about needing an accompanist for something, I immediately started practicing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
(UPDATED 5/15 WITH PROBABLE CAUSE OF DEATH) Dmitry Volkov, a promising Russian-born cellist who received an Artist Diploma from Peabody Conservatory last year, died on May 10 while visiting Baltimore. He was 26. The cause of death appears to have been a heart defect. "The preliminary word is that it was cardiac arrhythmia," said violinist Daniel Heifetz, founder of the Heifetz International Music Institute at Mary Baldwin College in Staunton, Va., where Mr. Volkov had been an artist in residence.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2014
WQXR in New York reports that Anthony McGill, one of the most eloquent clarinetists of our day, will join the New York Philharmonic in September as principal. McGill has been co-principal clarinetist of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra for a decade and a Peabody Conservatory faculty member since 2008. There is extra interest in the Philharmonic post since McGill is the third musician to be hired since the retirement, after six decades, of Stanley Drucker in 2009. The first two accepted the position, but subsequently changed their minds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Baltimore arts patrons Robert E. Meyerhoff and Rheda Becker have donated $1 million to the Peabody Institute of The Johns Hopkins University to establish scholarships for students of near-legendary pianist and veteran Peabody faculty artist Leon Fleisher. In a statement released Monday, Meyerhoff called the 85-year-old Fleisher "quite simply, one of the great musicians of our time," one who "attracts stellar pianistic talents to the Peabody Institute from all over the world. " The new donation follows the $1 million Meyerhoff and Becker donated in recent years to support an endowment for undergraduate piano scholarships.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
Well, that was exhilarating. The Peabody Symphony Orchestra's concert Thursday night delivered some impressive sonic power, with the near-legendary Leon Fleisher providing the ignition. Most celebrated as a pianist of uncommon insight, Fleisher began conducting decades ago when, due to focal dystonia, he lost use of his right hand. He brings to the podium the same striving for musical honesty and communicative depth that has always characterized his keyboard work (one- or two-handed)
NEWS
December 8, 1993
No one who has witnessed the sheer delight generated among young audiences at the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's children's concerts can doubt that the programs serve an important educational function. Through its Music for Youth, Tiny Tots and Prime Time programs, the orchestra has taken classical music off the dusty shelf of history and transformed it into a vibrant, living presence to be enjoyed by a new generation of concertgoers.Youngsters attending the BSO's children's concert tomorrow will be treated to an extraordinary performance by any standard: Among the musicians on stage will be some two dozen of their peers, prodigies from the Peabody Prep school between the ages of 14 and 17 who will perform side-by-side with the orchestra's regular players.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
News came overnight that John Shirley-Quirk has died in Bath, England, at the age of 82. The bass-baritone was a most eloquent singer; an especially insightful interpreter of music by Benjamin Britten; a man of great personal charm; and an inspiring teacher, who served froim 1992 to 2012 on the faculty at the Peabody Institute. I wanted to share this exquisite performance by Mr. Shirley-Quirk of a song by Ralph Vaughan Williams that, in a few short minutes, captures the essence of this vocal artist's rare gifts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Fred Bronstein, president of the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, will become the new head of the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University on June 1. His title will be dean, rather than the previous, longtime designation of director, in keeping with JHU's practice with its other academic divisions. "For quite some time, I was thinking I would eventually make this kind of a move," Bronstein said in a phone interview from St. Louis. "This seemed like the optimal opportunity.
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