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By Dave Zeiler and Dave Zeiler,Sun Staff | August 16, 1999
A few weeks ago, Bill Gates made the following remark about Apple's top-selling iMac: "The one thing Apple's providing now is leadership in colors," the chairman of Microsoft said while pointing to a red-hued Windows PC. "It won't take long for us to catch up with that, I don't think."Poor, misguided Bill. One year ago as of Aug. 15, Apple stunned the PC world with the iMac, an attractively styled machine designed for folks who want the benefits of a personal computer without the hassles.
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NEWS
By David Horsey | December 10, 2013
Jeff Bezos' announcement that Amazon hopes to eventually deliver packages to customers using little flying drones has caused a mini-uproar. From journalists to members of Congress, people are telling Bezos, "Wait just a gosh darn minute, mister!" Among those forwarding legislation to deal with the issue is Rep. Ted Poe (R-Texas). In comments on the floor of the House of Representatives, Mr. Poe said, "Think of how many drones could soon be flying around the sky. Here a drone, there a drone, everywhere a drone in the United States.
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NEWS
By Troy McCullough and Troy McCullough,Sun Columnist | July 1, 2007
PC World magazine came out with an interesting and thorough article last week titled "100 Blogs We Love," in which the magazine's editors listed their "favorite stops in the blogosphere, covering everything from high tech to low comedy and all manner of pursuits in between." The list contained the perfect mix of popular stalwarts and lesser-known sites and is one of the better guides of who's driving the blogging agenda in 2007. But blogger Jason Kottke - whose popular blog kottke.org was among those on the list - had a nit to pick.
NEWS
By Troy McCullough and Troy McCullough,Sun Columnist | July 1, 2007
PC World magazine came out with an interesting and thorough article last week titled "100 Blogs We Love," in which the magazine's editors listed their "favorite stops in the blogosphere, covering everything from high tech to low comedy and all manner of pursuits in between." The list contained the perfect mix of popular stalwarts and lesser-known sites and is one of the better guides of who's driving the blogging agenda in 2007. But blogger Jason Kottke - whose popular blog kottke.org was among those on the list - had a nit to pick.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 19, 1991
There so many computer publications on the market, you almost need a computer to keep track of them all. They range from magazines for the novice, casual user and expert to publications that specialize in a particular area of computing, such as telecommunications or desktop publishing.Start with the general topics magazines. As your expertise grows, sample others to see which talk about the subjects you are interested in. Here's a listing of some of the most popular computer publications.
BUSINESS
By L. R. Shannon and L. R. Shannon,New York Times News Service | December 16, 1991
A book on MS-DOS, the most popular operating system for personal computers, would be a welcome gift for a friend or relative, but you do have to know a few things before you buy one.First, and most important, is whether the recipient's computer runs DOS.The personal computers made by the International Business Machines Corp., and all the machines compatible with them, are DOS machines. (To be quibbling, true-blue IBM computers use PC-DOS, rather than MS-DOS, but they amount to the same thing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Zeiler and Dave Zeiler,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1998
When Steve Jobs unveiled the strikingly different iMac last month, he touched off a wave of questions among the Mac faithful.Is this the product that will restore Apple's lost luster? Why did Apple omit a floppy drive? Will it entice Windows users to switch to the Mac? Will first-time PC buyers want one? Should I buy one?The Mac press has mostly swooned over the translucent white and ice blue iMac, which won't be available until August. The curvy all-in-one design and the inclusion of several forward-looking technologies certainly command attention.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | November 25, 2004
WHEN I wrote my first holiday column on buying a PC some 19 years ago, the marketplace was pretty confusing. There were lots manufacturers and even more models - IBM-compatibles, Commodore 64s and Amigas, Apple IIs and Macs, Radio Shack TRS-80s, Timex-Sinclairs, Atari STs and plenty that I've forgotten. They all used different operating systems, and all were incompatible with one another. So buying a PC was a bit like committing to marriage. Today it's much simpler. There are Windows PCs and Macs, period.
NEWS
By David Horsey | December 10, 2013
Jeff Bezos' announcement that Amazon hopes to eventually deliver packages to customers using little flying drones has caused a mini-uproar. From journalists to members of Congress, people are telling Bezos, "Wait just a gosh darn minute, mister!" Among those forwarding legislation to deal with the issue is Rep. Ted Poe (R-Texas). In comments on the floor of the House of Representatives, Mr. Poe said, "Think of how many drones could soon be flying around the sky. Here a drone, there a drone, everywhere a drone in the United States.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Mark Ribbing and Michael Stroh and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1999
Will Microsoft Windows go the way of the abacus?On Friday, U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson issued the first part of his decision in the government's antitrust case against Microsoft, finding that the software giant has a monopoly in the operating systems that act as the brains of computers worldwide.But even as the court mulls what should be done about Microsoft and its popular operating system, companies are tapping the Internet to create technologies that might someday make Windows -- and possibly the personal computer -- a high-tech has-been.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | November 25, 2004
WHEN I wrote my first holiday column on buying a PC some 19 years ago, the marketplace was pretty confusing. There were lots manufacturers and even more models - IBM-compatibles, Commodore 64s and Amigas, Apple IIs and Macs, Radio Shack TRS-80s, Timex-Sinclairs, Atari STs and plenty that I've forgotten. They all used different operating systems, and all were incompatible with one another. So buying a PC was a bit like committing to marriage. Today it's much simpler. There are Windows PCs and Macs, period.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Mark Ribbing and Michael Stroh and Mark Ribbing,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1999
Will Microsoft Windows go the way of the abacus?On Friday, U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson issued the first part of his decision in the government's antitrust case against Microsoft, finding that the software giant has a monopoly in the operating systems that act as the brains of computers worldwide.But even as the court mulls what should be done about Microsoft and its popular operating system, companies are tapping the Internet to create technologies that might someday make Windows -- and possibly the personal computer -- a high-tech has-been.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Zeiler and Dave Zeiler,Sun Staff | August 16, 1999
A few weeks ago, Bill Gates made the following remark about Apple's top-selling iMac: "The one thing Apple's providing now is leadership in colors," the chairman of Microsoft said while pointing to a red-hued Windows PC. "It won't take long for us to catch up with that, I don't think."Poor, misguided Bill. One year ago as of Aug. 15, Apple stunned the PC world with the iMac, an attractively styled machine designed for folks who want the benefits of a personal computer without the hassles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Zeiler and Dave Zeiler,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1998
When Steve Jobs unveiled the strikingly different iMac last month, he touched off a wave of questions among the Mac faithful.Is this the product that will restore Apple's lost luster? Why did Apple omit a floppy drive? Will it entice Windows users to switch to the Mac? Will first-time PC buyers want one? Should I buy one?The Mac press has mostly swooned over the translucent white and ice blue iMac, which won't be available until August. The curvy all-in-one design and the inclusion of several forward-looking technologies certainly command attention.
BUSINESS
By L. R. Shannon and L. R. Shannon,New York Times News Service | December 16, 1991
A book on MS-DOS, the most popular operating system for personal computers, would be a welcome gift for a friend or relative, but you do have to know a few things before you buy one.First, and most important, is whether the recipient's computer runs DOS.The personal computers made by the International Business Machines Corp., and all the machines compatible with them, are DOS machines. (To be quibbling, true-blue IBM computers use PC-DOS, rather than MS-DOS, but they amount to the same thing.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 19, 1991
There so many computer publications on the market, you almost need a computer to keep track of them all. They range from magazines for the novice, casual user and expert to publications that specialize in a particular area of computing, such as telecommunications or desktop publishing.Start with the general topics magazines. As your expertise grows, sample others to see which talk about the subjects you are interested in. Here's a listing of some of the most popular computer publications.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Out with the old, in with the new. Three banks of pay phones at Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport have been converted to charging stations for electronic devices, a small upgrade big on symbolism and commentary on our changing times. The switch adds 184 outlets and USB ports in concourse D, an effort aimed at reducing plug-jockeying at the gates of JetBlue, Delta, United, U.S. Airways and Air Canada. The outlets replace previously removed phones that used to dangle inside the silver kiosks mounted on the walls.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Doug Bedell and Doug Bedell,Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 20, 2000
When all else fails, support technicians sometimes suggest a humorous way to end the frustrating problems reported by new computer owners. It's called using the floor tool, meaning you lift your confused box overhead and smash it on the ground. To prevent such extreme measures, experts at numerous computer specialty magazines and Web sites offer wide-ranging, detailed evaluations of major computer manufacturers' fix-it abilities. Three of the most established are the annual surveys by PC World, PC Magazine and Winmag.
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