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By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | October 3, 1994
When the kids brought their books home on the first day of school this year, we did what we've done for the last nine years.We rummaged, in the closet, found some old paper bags from the supermarket, and made book covers.The kids scrawled the name of the subject on each cover, and that was it.So imagine how guilty I felt when I opened the premier issue of Family PC magazine and found a lavishly-illustrated article on how to use your computer to spiff up those old paper bags and make impeccably-decorated book covers with multiple fonts, fancy graphics, cutouts and inserts "that erupt in vibrant colors and fun designs."
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BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | December 6, 2007
Today's computer is a year-round home and business appliance - more like a fridge or dishwasher than a video game console. But retailers still sell a disproportionate number around the holidays. This year, as usual, the news for buyers is good: Computers are more powerful, more useful and more fun than ever. They're cheaper, too, although margins are so tight that it's hard to see low-end PC prices going much lower than they are today. Before we discuss the details of computer shopping, let's get one thing out of the way: It doesn't necessarily matter which brand of PC you buy. In the course of supplying the family with PCs and feeding my silicon habit for 20-plus years, I've bought or used Dells, IBMs, Compaqs, HPs, eMachines, Gateways, Toshibas, Macs and a variety of generic clones.
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BUSINESS
By Newsday | October 28, 1994
NEW YORK -- Leveraged buyout firm Forstmann Little & Co. will buy the Ziff-Davis Publishing Co., the largest U.S. computer magazine publisher, for $1.4 billion in cash.Sealed bids were due last night, but Forstmann Little made an offer a few days ago, essentially telling Ziff-Davis to take it or leave it.Sources said other companies that had closely examined the publishing arm of Ziff Communications and might have bid were Reed Elsevier PLC, a British-Dutch publisher; German publisher Bertelsmann AG; Japanese software distributor Softbank Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Crayton Harrison and Crayton Harrison,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 17, 2003
Dell Computer Corp. continues to lead the PC industry in customer service, while Hewlett-Packard Co. can't seem to make up any ground, according to poll results to be released today. Dell, based in Round Rock, Texas, along with Apple Computer Inc., got high marks by shipping products that work right out of the box, according to PC Magazine's annual customer satisfaction survey. "If you don't need support as often, if you don't need repairs, then you're going to be more satisfied," said Ben Gottesman, executive editor of the magazine, which will publish its findings in the July 22 issue.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Crayton Harrison and Crayton Harrison,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 17, 2003
Dell Computer Corp. continues to lead the PC industry in customer service, while Hewlett-Packard Co. can't seem to make up any ground, according to poll results to be released today. Dell, based in Round Rock, Texas, along with Apple Computer Inc., got high marks by shipping products that work right out of the box, according to PC Magazine's annual customer satisfaction survey. "If you don't need support as often, if you don't need repairs, then you're going to be more satisfied," said Ben Gottesman, executive editor of the magazine, which will publish its findings in the July 22 issue.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL HIMOWITZ | July 20, 1997
FROM time to time, I like to answer questions from the "I know this sounds dumb" mailbag. As usual, these aren't dumb questions at all -- just questions that people won't ask because they're afraid of sounding dumb. So ask away.Question: I keep reading about programs called "utilities," but I can't find any on my disk. What do utilities do? Am I missing something?Long answer: If you look at PC magazine's list of top-selling business software this month, you'll notice something odd.Of the Top 10 programs, only two have anything to do with actual business.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Doug Bedell and Doug Bedell,Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 20, 2000
When all else fails, support technicians sometimes suggest a humorous way to end the frustrating problems reported by new computer owners. It's called using the floor tool, meaning you lift your confused box overhead and smash it on the ground. To prevent such extreme measures, experts at numerous computer specialty magazines and Web sites offer wide-ranging, detailed evaluations of major computer manufacturers' fix-it abilities. Three of the most established are the annual surveys by PC World, PC Magazine and Winmag.
FEATURES
By Michael Himowitz and Michael Himowitz,Evening Sun Staff | September 24, 1990
A RECENT survey of 18,000 PC Magazine readers showed that 40 percent reported having problems with their computers during the previous year.While the poll was not a truly scientific sample, its size and the consistency of its results show that PC buyers had better be prepared to deal with trouble.In a large corporation, which is likely to have in-house computer support or a contract with a service company, a PC that goes on the blink may not cause too many problems. It can usually be repaired quickly, and spares may be available.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 19, 1991
There so many computer publications on the market, you almost need a computer to keep track of them all. They range from magazines for the novice, casual user and expert to publications that specialize in a particular area of computing, such as telecommunications or desktop publishing.Start with the general topics magazines. As your expertise grows, sample others to see which talk about the subjects you are interested in. Here's a listing of some of the most popular computer publications.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 19, 1993
The bookstore cashier couldn't believe it. When even the slimmest paperback costs $6.95, I was buying a 902-page magazine, weighing in at about 5 1/4 pounds, for only $2.95. Computer Shopper, a Ziff-Davis publication, is the best bargain in the publishing world.Of course, it's virtually unreadable. Nearly all computer magazines are. They're too fat, overloaded with nearly identical ads, and they are built in such a way as to make page-thumbing impossible. Truth is, they are preposterously inefficient ways to keep up on changes in the technology world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Doug Bedell and Doug Bedell,Knight Ridder/Tribune | March 20, 2000
When all else fails, support technicians sometimes suggest a humorous way to end the frustrating problems reported by new computer owners. It's called using the floor tool, meaning you lift your confused box overhead and smash it on the ground. To prevent such extreme measures, experts at numerous computer specialty magazines and Web sites offer wide-ranging, detailed evaluations of major computer manufacturers' fix-it abilities. Three of the most established are the annual surveys by PC World, PC Magazine and Winmag.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL HIMOWITZ | July 20, 1997
FROM time to time, I like to answer questions from the "I know this sounds dumb" mailbag. As usual, these aren't dumb questions at all -- just questions that people won't ask because they're afraid of sounding dumb. So ask away.Question: I keep reading about programs called "utilities," but I can't find any on my disk. What do utilities do? Am I missing something?Long answer: If you look at PC magazine's list of top-selling business software this month, you'll notice something odd.Of the Top 10 programs, only two have anything to do with actual business.
BUSINESS
By Newsday | October 28, 1994
NEW YORK -- Leveraged buyout firm Forstmann Little & Co. will buy the Ziff-Davis Publishing Co., the largest U.S. computer magazine publisher, for $1.4 billion in cash.Sealed bids were due last night, but Forstmann Little made an offer a few days ago, essentially telling Ziff-Davis to take it or leave it.Sources said other companies that had closely examined the publishing arm of Ziff Communications and might have bid were Reed Elsevier PLC, a British-Dutch publisher; German publisher Bertelsmann AG; Japanese software distributor Softbank Corp.
BUSINESS
By MICHAEL J. HIMOWITZ | October 3, 1994
When the kids brought their books home on the first day of school this year, we did what we've done for the last nine years.We rummaged, in the closet, found some old paper bags from the supermarket, and made book covers.The kids scrawled the name of the subject on each cover, and that was it.So imagine how guilty I felt when I opened the premier issue of Family PC magazine and found a lavishly-illustrated article on how to use your computer to spiff up those old paper bags and make impeccably-decorated book covers with multiple fonts, fancy graphics, cutouts and inserts "that erupt in vibrant colors and fun designs."
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 19, 1993
The bookstore cashier couldn't believe it. When even the slimmest paperback costs $6.95, I was buying a 902-page magazine, weighing in at about 5 1/4 pounds, for only $2.95. Computer Shopper, a Ziff-Davis publication, is the best bargain in the publishing world.Of course, it's virtually unreadable. Nearly all computer magazines are. They're too fat, overloaded with nearly identical ads, and they are built in such a way as to make page-thumbing impossible. Truth is, they are preposterously inefficient ways to keep up on changes in the technology world.
BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | August 19, 1991
There so many computer publications on the market, you almost need a computer to keep track of them all. They range from magazines for the novice, casual user and expert to publications that specialize in a particular area of computing, such as telecommunications or desktop publishing.Start with the general topics magazines. As your expertise grows, sample others to see which talk about the subjects you are interested in. Here's a listing of some of the most popular computer publications.
BUSINESS
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | December 6, 2007
Today's computer is a year-round home and business appliance - more like a fridge or dishwasher than a video game console. But retailers still sell a disproportionate number around the holidays. This year, as usual, the news for buyers is good: Computers are more powerful, more useful and more fun than ever. They're cheaper, too, although margins are so tight that it's hard to see low-end PC prices going much lower than they are today. Before we discuss the details of computer shopping, let's get one thing out of the way: It doesn't necessarily matter which brand of PC you buy. In the course of supplying the family with PCs and feeding my silicon habit for 20-plus years, I've bought or used Dells, IBMs, Compaqs, HPs, eMachines, Gateways, Toshibas, Macs and a variety of generic clones.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2002
Here's how tech manufacturers stacked up in PC Magazine's reliability poll of 15,000 readers. The total number of responses is shown next to each company. Desktops Dell (1,253) A Gateway (578) B+ Locally built (1,375) B+ IBM (217) D Hewlett-Packard (582) D-- Compaq (663) E Laptops Apple (100) A Hewlett-Packard (338) A IBM (910) A Toshiba (875) A Dell (1,684) B+ Fujitsu (106) B Sony (343) B-- Gateway (299) C Compaq (945) E Printers Hewlett-Packard (3,530) A+ Epson (1,258)
FEATURES
By Michael Himowitz and Michael Himowitz,Evening Sun Staff | September 24, 1990
A RECENT survey of 18,000 PC Magazine readers showed that 40 percent reported having problems with their computers during the previous year.While the poll was not a truly scientific sample, its size and the consistency of its results show that PC buyers had better be prepared to deal with trouble.In a large corporation, which is likely to have in-house computer support or a contract with a service company, a PC that goes on the blink may not cause too many problems. It can usually be repaired quickly, and spares may be available.
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