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By STEPHEN MANES | March 11, 1996
I AM TYPING THIS sentence, not without difficulty, on the smallest full-fledged IBM personal computer around. How small? About the size of a paperback novel.Designed for the Japanese market, this machine is so far unavailable in the United States. But since it is in many ways the equal of units four times its size, I wanted to see just how much technology can be stuffed into the space of a sandwich.Answer: plenty. In this almost extravagant collection of cleverness, the infrared port seems downright ho-hum.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | November 15, 1999
Windows 98 offers a program called Microsoft Windows TV. I installed it and have the little TV screen icon on my task bar. When I log on, I get fancy diagrams but nothing moves when I try to use the mouse to turn on the television.Using that old cliche, when all else fails, read the instructions, I did and see where I missed the last instruction that said "install antenna." There is no port on the back of my PC that says "antenna." Can you help me?Count yourself among the hordes of Microsoft customers who have had their hopes built up about getting television programs on their PCs by misleading directions built into Windows 98.As your experience underscores, the Windows setup screens falsely indicate that any PC running Windows 98 can receive broadcast video in the WinTV module of Windows.
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BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,New York Times News Service | July 7, 1997
IT IS THE LITTLEST standard Windows 95 computer officially released in America. It is so small that people may soon be reaching into their fanny packs and purses and demanding that you watch their dreaded Powerpoint presentations.It is the new Libretto 50CT from Toshiba America Information Systems Inc., and it weighs just 1.85 pounds and measures 8.3 by 4.5 by 1.3 inches, a bit smaller and heavier than a couple of Fodor's travel guides.You can easily find machines with specifications that beat its 75-megahertz Pentium processor, 16 megabytes of RAM and 810-megabyte hard drive for half its $2,000 price.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1999
Proxim's Symphony creates PC harmony by wireless networkSeveral weeks ago, we reviewed Diamond Multimedia's HomeFree Wireless Networking kit. That inexpensive system is good for basic file and print sharing between the PCs in your house, but it has its failings, such as frequent packet loss.A more flexible and reliable solution is Proxim's wireless Symphony ($149 with an internal ISA card, $199 for a laptop PC card). This system is just as simple and quick to set up and use as HomeFree. You plug an ISA-based card into each desktop PC on the network and a PC card into each laptop.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn You can find full reviews of these and other neat gadgets at www.streettech.com. Pub Date: 10/05/98 | October 5, 1998
RealPort offers modem, Ethernet for laptop computersHardware like the RealPort restores my faith in technology. It fulfills key needs of mobile professionals with style and attention detail.The RealPort ($399) is a PC card that functions as a 56K modem, a 10Base-T/100Base-T Ethernet card and a mobile phone modem connection. It takes up two stacked Type II PCMCIA slots or one Type III slot. One reason it hogs all of the slot real estate is its use of standard jacks to connect the modem and LAN cables, instead of the common pop-out jacks (or "X-Jacks")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn | March 8, 1999
Road warriors can stay connected with Sierra's AirCardMobile data communication, the ability to stay connected regardless of where you and your computer may roam, is an attractive idea that has so far remained elusive for most. But Sierra Wireless of Richmond, British Columbia has several products that offer multiple connectivity solutions for today's hyperactive road warriors.The company's popular AirCard ($895) offers three ways to connect: a conventional 33.6 kbps land line modem, a CDPD (Cellular Digital Packet Data)
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1999
Proxim's Symphony creates PC harmony by wireless networkSeveral weeks ago, we reviewed Diamond Multimedia's HomeFree Wireless Networking kit. That inexpensive system is good for basic file and print sharing between the PCs in your house, but it has its failings, such as frequent packet loss.A more flexible and reliable solution is Proxim's wireless Symphony ($149 with an internal ISA card, $199 for a laptop PC card). This system is just as simple and quick to set up and use as HomeFree. You plug an ISA-based card into each desktop PC on the network and a PC card into each laptop.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes | October 6, 1997
JUST WHEN you think computing devices cannot get any smaller, along comes one that proves you wrong. A stack of five credit cards is an almost perfect match for the size and heft of the Rex PC Companion, marketed by Franklin Electronic Publishers Inc. under the Rolodex brand.Although it is the tiniest electronic calendar and address book yet and weighs just an ounce and a half, its 256 kilobytes of memory should hold up to 3,000 items. Exactly how many depends on things like how many cellular phones, fax machines and e-mail addresses your friends and colleagues tend to have and whether you have a busy calendar or an empty one.And for sheer portability, this little device beats everything that has come before it. Even with the leather-case cardholder that comes with the more capacious model, it is still small enough that you can slip it into purse or pocket, carry it everywhere and mislay it under a playing card.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes | June 17, 1996
WHEN THE PLANE touches down at gate A1 and the connecting flight departs from gate D437, the typical notebook computer becomes a clanking ball and chain.The two or three pounds you save by carrying a lighter model can spell the difference between mere crankiness and terminal depression.Today's light computers come with fewer and fewer compromises, and the latest line of the International Business Machines Corp. looks like the best yet. The Thinkpad 560 models weigh a svelte 4.2 pounds and are not much bigger than a successful magazine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn | January 11, 1999
Set up home network with Diamond's radio spectrum hardwareWith the rapidly dropping prices of PCs, many households find themselves with more than one computer. But what about all of those peripherals? Do you get a scanner for each machine? Printer? Modem? Do you shuttle disks around the house to move data from one PC to the next? You could hook up your own Ethernet, but that's just too ``deep geek'' for most people.Diamond Multimedia offers a solution that just about anyone can afford and set up. Their HomeFree Wireless Network comes in several different flavors to handle a variety of network situations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn | March 8, 1999
Road warriors can stay connected with Sierra's AirCardMobile data communication, the ability to stay connected regardless of where you and your computer may roam, is an attractive idea that has so far remained elusive for most. But Sierra Wireless of Richmond, British Columbia has several products that offer multiple connectivity solutions for today's hyperactive road warriors.The company's popular AirCard ($895) offers three ways to connect: a conventional 33.6 kbps land line modem, a CDPD (Cellular Digital Packet Data)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn | January 11, 1999
Set up home network with Diamond's radio spectrum hardwareWith the rapidly dropping prices of PCs, many households find themselves with more than one computer. But what about all of those peripherals? Do you get a scanner for each machine? Printer? Modem? Do you shuttle disks around the house to move data from one PC to the next? You could hook up your own Ethernet, but that's just too ``deep geek'' for most people.Diamond Multimedia offers a solution that just about anyone can afford and set up. Their HomeFree Wireless Network comes in several different flavors to handle a variety of network situations.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Gareth Branwyn You can find full reviews of these and other neat gadgets at www.streettech.com. Pub Date: 10/05/98 | October 5, 1998
RealPort offers modem, Ethernet for laptop computersHardware like the RealPort restores my faith in technology. It fulfills key needs of mobile professionals with style and attention detail.The RealPort ($399) is a PC card that functions as a 56K modem, a 10Base-T/100Base-T Ethernet card and a mobile phone modem connection. It takes up two stacked Type II PCMCIA slots or one Type III slot. One reason it hogs all of the slot real estate is its use of standard jacks to connect the modem and LAN cables, instead of the common pop-out jacks (or "X-Jacks")
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes | October 6, 1997
JUST WHEN you think computing devices cannot get any smaller, along comes one that proves you wrong. A stack of five credit cards is an almost perfect match for the size and heft of the Rex PC Companion, marketed by Franklin Electronic Publishers Inc. under the Rolodex brand.Although it is the tiniest electronic calendar and address book yet and weighs just an ounce and a half, its 256 kilobytes of memory should hold up to 3,000 items. Exactly how many depends on things like how many cellular phones, fax machines and e-mail addresses your friends and colleagues tend to have and whether you have a busy calendar or an empty one.And for sheer portability, this little device beats everything that has come before it. Even with the leather-case cardholder that comes with the more capacious model, it is still small enough that you can slip it into purse or pocket, carry it everywhere and mislay it under a playing card.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes and Stephen Manes,New York Times News Service | July 7, 1997
IT IS THE LITTLEST standard Windows 95 computer officially released in America. It is so small that people may soon be reaching into their fanny packs and purses and demanding that you watch their dreaded Powerpoint presentations.It is the new Libretto 50CT from Toshiba America Information Systems Inc., and it weighs just 1.85 pounds and measures 8.3 by 4.5 by 1.3 inches, a bit smaller and heavier than a couple of Fodor's travel guides.You can easily find machines with specifications that beat its 75-megahertz Pentium processor, 16 megabytes of RAM and 810-megabyte hard drive for half its $2,000 price.
BUSINESS
By Stephen Manes | June 17, 1996
WHEN THE PLANE touches down at gate A1 and the connecting flight departs from gate D437, the typical notebook computer becomes a clanking ball and chain.The two or three pounds you save by carrying a lighter model can spell the difference between mere crankiness and terminal depression.Today's light computers come with fewer and fewer compromises, and the latest line of the International Business Machines Corp. looks like the best yet. The Thinkpad 560 models weigh a svelte 4.2 pounds and are not much bigger than a successful magazine.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James Coates and James Coates,Chicago Tribune | November 15, 1999
Windows 98 offers a program called Microsoft Windows TV. I installed it and have the little TV screen icon on my task bar. When I log on, I get fancy diagrams but nothing moves when I try to use the mouse to turn on the television.Using that old cliche, when all else fails, read the instructions, I did and see where I missed the last instruction that said "install antenna." There is no port on the back of my PC that says "antenna." Can you help me?Count yourself among the hordes of Microsoft customers who have had their hopes built up about getting television programs on their PCs by misleading directions built into Windows 98.As your experience underscores, the Windows setup screens falsely indicate that any PC running Windows 98 can receive broadcast video in the WinTV module of Windows.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2000
New digital camcorder from Canon excels at capturing a moment It's not Pi in the sky: Canon's Optura Pi camcorder -- listed at $1,300 --- can capture digital video with excellent quality and improved image stabilization. The Optura Pi can take individual pictures, but even better, it offers progressive scan capability in which 30 frames are captured in a single second, from which individual stills can be taken. This is great for fast-action photography. Best of all, these digital images never degrade.
BUSINESS
By STEPHEN MANES | March 11, 1996
I AM TYPING THIS sentence, not without difficulty, on the smallest full-fledged IBM personal computer around. How small? About the size of a paperback novel.Designed for the Japanese market, this machine is so far unavailable in the United States. But since it is in many ways the equal of units four times its size, I wanted to see just how much technology can be stuffed into the space of a sandwich.Answer: plenty. In this almost extravagant collection of cleverness, the infrared port seems downright ho-hum.
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