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BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | October 1, 2006
I am very disappointed in my shares of Dell Inc. and wonder if there is light at the end of this tunnel. - K.T., via the Internet There is trouble in what was once the paradise of the computer world. The nation's No. 1 personal computer manufacturer must reassess everything it does, including its long-admired direct-to-consumer business model based on Internet and telephone orders. Its fiscal second-quarter report to regulators has been delayed due to probes of its accounting methods by the Securities and Exchange Commission and the U.S. attorney's office of the Southern District of New York.
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NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | June 15, 2014
"Political cover" is a powerful phenomenon in contemporary politics. But it can make voters plenty cynical about the ways and means of political warfare. It's typically utilized wherever a well-known progressive Democrat speaks or acts outside of permissible lines, i.e., crosses the politically correct police with an insensitive (or worse) comment on the public stage. On such occasions, the mainstream press will duly note the offensive comment. Appropriate, albeit limited, criticism will follow.
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BUSINESS
By Copley News Service | May 24, 1993
The ultimate personal computer system is only a few thousand dollars away. But what if you don't have scads of money to spend on a new computer? Why, fix up the one you already have, of course.That's the premise of "Keep Your PC Cookin'," written by Keith Aleshire and published by Bantam Computer Books. This guide is chock full of ways to enhance an older-model IBM PC or compatible, without joining Uncle Sam in the "Incredibly In Debt" sweepstakes.As with most books on upgrading a PC, "Keep Your PC Cookin' " spends most of the time telling you about new and improved hardware you can use with your computer to make it faster and better.
NEWS
December 27, 2013
I came across The Sun's editorial regarding "Duck Dynasty" while searching the Internet to sign Mike Huckabee's petition supporting Phil Robertson ("Ruffling feathers,  Dec. 23). I grew up near Baltimore, am an independent, went to prestigious universities in the East and am a Phi Beta Kappa. I think your editorial basically blew it. You missed the most important thing going on here - the attempt of the politically correct police like Piers Morgan to suppress speech and opinions that disagree with their views.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | June 14, 1999
There are plenty of bargain PCs on the market today, and they offer astonishing power for the money. For $1,000 or less, you can buy a computer that will run rings around virtually anything that was on the market two years ago.But when I went shopping for an inexpensive machine a few weeks ago, I learned that all too often, what you see is exactly what you get. And what you may not get is the ability to expand or upgrade your PC as your needs change.While...
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | November 20, 2003
IT'S HERE AGAIN - the season when PC shoppers flock to the stores and buy a remarkably large proportion of all the computers sold during the year. Since many of you are on your second, third or even fourth machine, the angst of PC purchase isn't as great as it was a decade ago. Still, lots of people worry about it. As usual, this year's computers are cheaper and more powerful than ever. You can find a good basic machine for $700 or less, a decent all-around performer for $1,000 and a barnburner for $1,500.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MIKE HIMOWITZ | April 11, 2002
Just say no. That's what we tell our kids to do when someone offers them drugs. But perhaps we should consider saying it ourselves when someone offers us the computer drug of the new millennium - free software. Over the past year we've learned that the free software that the kids use to swap MP3 music files over the Internet comes at a price - spyware that tracks our movements across the Web, even when the programs aren't being used, and sometimes after they've been uninstalled. But those programs are just the tip of the iceberg.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | August 3, 1998
For millions of students who graduated from high school last month, it's time to get serious about heading off to college in September. That means finding the right computer to take with you.Although this is often the cause of much hand-wringing, it doesn't have to be. A call to the college computer center and some judicious shopping will produce a well-connected freshman.First, find out if the college requires a particular computer. A handful of schools have taken the choice out of your hands to ensure that all students are compatible from the first day of classes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | March 6, 2000
We all know that computers are still too hard to use. Part of the blame falls on software designers, who still haven't figured out how to make PCs work the way humans think they should. And part of the blame goes to humans, who think computers should be as easy to use as toasters, even though they can do a lot more than burn the English muffins. Whatever the reason, hardly a day goes by when I don't get a question or complaint such as, "I downloaded a file from the Internet and now I can't find it."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | December 24, 1994
Compaq Computer Corp. will ship more personal computers in 1994 than the company that coined the term "PC," knocking International Business Machines Corp. from the top spot for the first time.Compaq may widen its lead in 1995, partly because of its popular line of "multimedia" personal computers and lively demand from consumers who want a PC at home.For the first time, the PC is truly "personal": About half of all IBM-clone PCs sold in the fourth quarter were for home use, analysts said.And Compaq is in a position to build on its hold in the thriving home-computer segment, whereas IBM's traditional PC strength is among business customers, analysts said.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
With a shareholder vote just days away, T. Rowe Price, one of Dell Inc.'s major investors, reaffirmed its opposition to a $24.4 billion buyout offer for the personal computer manufacturer. "We continue to believe the proposed buyout does not reflect the value of Dell and we do not intend to support the offer as put forward," Brian Rogers, Price chairman and chief investment officer, said in a statement Monday. The Baltimore-based money manager owned 71.8 million shares, or 4.03 percent of Dell, at the end of March, Morningstar reports.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2013
Neurosurgeon Dr. Ben Carson has joined The Washington Times as a weekly opinion columnist, about a week after retiring from his post at Johns Hopkins Hospital. In his first column, published Wednesday, Carson outlined much of the viewpoint that gained him attention in the political realm after speeches earlier this year — criticizing political correctness and defending his position against same-sex marriage. "For a long time, I thought that retirement would mean learning to play golf well, learning to play the organ and learning a variety of new languages," Carson wrote.
NEWS
April 25, 2013
The FBI had previously been warned by the Russian government that the 26-year-old Boston bombing terrorist Tamerlan Tsarnaev was being radicalized ("Bombing suspect faces U.S. charges," April 23). The FBI interviewed him and then just opened the door and said have a good day. No further attention was given him by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Why? When he left the United States and went to Russia in 2012 for six months, there was no questioning of him by the FBI at his return.
NEWS
April 14, 2013
I literally choked on my coffee when I read the first sentence of your editorial, "Hopkins students get it right, at last," (April 11). Let me quote it now that I've recovered. "The bright young people in student government at the John Hopkins University no doubt pride themselves on their openness to a diversity of views and their commitment to the free exchange of ideas. " Are you kidding me? Was this said tongue in cheek or are you so blatantly biased that you said this in all sincerity?
NEWS
April 2, 2013
In his Sunday column, Dan Rodricks proved the correctness of Ben Carson's statement concerning the PC police ("Ben Carson's conservative views are drawn from the Bible" Mar 30). If you make a statement that is politically incorrect, you will be attacked by the liberals who will try to shut you up. Ben Carson did not make any homophobic statements. He merely said that God's word says that marriage is between a man and a woman. That is our creator's design, not man's and no man can change God's plan to suit their own desires.
NEWS
November 8, 2012
The "Unhappy Halloween, Hon" (Nov. 3) commentary by Michael Cross-Barnet was a scream. Like a Holy Roman emperor or a demented totalitarian dictator, it dictated what was appropriate free speech for all times and all places. It also chastised the owner of Cafe Hon for apologizing for a Halloween depiction of a white person with a black face only twice and not at least three times. Moreover, the writer actually spelled out in several sentences what it deemed as the only appropriate wording of a theoretical third apology by the Cafe Hon . And what was the Hon's verbal trespass?
FEATURES
By A.M. Chaplin | May 12, 1991
"I THOUGHT I WAS GOING TO GET A LOT of hate mail, but quite the opposite," says Brown University senior Jeff Shesol, creator of "Politically Correct Person," one of the characters in the popular Brown Daily Herald comic strip "Thatch."The favorable response to the introduction of P.C. Person -- fitted out like a superhero in cape, trunks and iron-clad idealism -- suggests "that the P.C. are a real minority," Mr. Shesol believes. But despite their small numbers, he says, "they make a lot of noise and shut down the discussion, which goes against the idea of what the university is all about.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Himowitz | August 26, 2004
One of the pleasures of writing a tech column is that I get to try gadgets that are absolutely unnecessary for daily existence but are fun to fool around with. And it's really fun when the gadget works as advertised. So it is with the Hauppage MediaMVP, a $100 network appliance that allows you to use a television to play the music, video or digital photo files stored on your computer. It will work up to 100 feet away, assuming you're willing to snake a cable that far from your PC to your television.
NEWS
December 29, 2011
Your newspaper included two photos of the Polish Community Association's Christmas celebration on page 2 of the Dec. 24 edition. Unfortunately, the captions were not correct. We sang Christmas carols and hymns, not "seasonal songs. " We donned our Christmas finery for the event, not "holiday apparel. " We even stopped at three churches. Translation for my friends at the politically correct Sun: We were celebrating the birth of Jesus Christ. Merry Christmas! Maryann Nietubicz
NEWS
November 13, 2010
Somewhere along the way, Thanksgiving changed. Once a day of simple adoration of a supermarket turkey roasted in the oven, the cuisine and ethic of the holiday have grown complicated. Now there is societal pressure to buy a local bird and to inquire about the turkey's upbringing. There is a cacophony of expert advice on how to prepare the bird with recommendations ranging from bathing the raw bird in salt water, to smoking it in a barbecue cooker, to dropping it into a deep fat fryer.
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