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August 14, 2012
Please explain why Baltimore County school "leaders" agreed to pay $150,000 to the two school employees who were given contracts by former Superintendent Joe Hairston if the contract was illegal? (School system agrees to settlement with two employees," Aug. 13.) This makes no sense and is another example of unelected people making decisions for those whose taxes pay the freight! As a taxpayer, I resent this type of activity and expect the county executive to rescind this nonsense or Mr. Hairston to pony up to the county treasury.
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HEALTH
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2014
More than two dozen of Dr. Nikita Levy's former patients have filed an objection to a $190 million class-action settlement over the Johns Hopkins gynecologist's malpractice. The plaintiffs cited an "excessive legal fee" requested by the lawyers who negotiated the settlement and a lack of clarity regarding the amount each patient would receive, according to the objection. The settlement - one of the largest ever of its kind - was announced in July, five months after investigators found more than 1,300 videos and images, surreptitiously recorded during pelvic exams, in Levy's home and office.
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BUSINESS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | July 19, 1992
LONG BEACH, Calif. -- At the end of last year, after putting in 40 years at Douglas Aircraft Co., Don H. Scoville retired.At 58, he left his job as an administrator in the company's C-17 program, taking with him the largest check of his life: more than $100,000 from a 401(k) tax-deferred savings plan.With the big payout, Mr. Scoville faced the investment decision of a lifetime. In today's economic hard times, with layoffs all too common and older workers often encouraged to retire early, it is a situation confronting many people.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2014
City officials want to hire their own assessors to determine the size of historic tax credits in response to errors blamed on the state that left some property owners with wildly inaccurate bills. The proposal is the latest step by the Rawlings-Blake administration to resolve problems in the calculation of the tax credits for improvement to historic properties. The calculations were sometimes wrong, and some property owners wound up owing thousands of dollars more in taxes than they anticipated.
NEWS
By S. M. Khalid | February 4, 1991
After waiting nine years for a measure of justice, nearly 300 people turned out yesterday afternoon at a Dundalk union hall to discuss how they would divide their share of the $415 million settlement of a national class-action suit against their former employer, Continental Can Co.The settlement, announced a month ago, was reached after a federal judge in New Jersey ruled that Continental Can had violated federal law in the late 1970s and early 1980s by...
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,Staff Writer | October 27, 1993
ROSEMONT, Ill. -- Jerry Richardson, lead investor in the Charlotte, N.C., expansion bid, said modifications made last week in the city's payout to visiting teams contributed heavily to the Carolina Panthers' victory last night.The 28 NFL owners voted unanimously to give Charlotte one of two expansion franchises.NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue had said the league would expand by two, but Charlotte was the only city that received a complete endorsement from the seven-member expansion committee.
BUSINESS
By DALLAS MORNING NEWS | February 22, 2006
DALLAS -- David Edmondson leaves RadioShack Corp. with a black eye for enhancing his resume. His reputation also took a blow from the 25 percent plunge in the retailer's share price during his nine-month tenure as chief executive. But a payout of about $1.5 million in cash and stock could help ease the pain. That kind of money grates on people unaccustomed to the golden handshakes, golden handcuffs, golden parachutes and multimillion-dollar compensation packages that are commonplace in executive suites.
NEWS
By JENNIFER MCMENAMIN and JENNIFER MCMENAMIN,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2000
Backing off from earlier statements about William H. Hyde's retirement payout, the Carroll County Board of Education said Friday it will not pay for life and health insurance costs for the former superintendent, who unexpectedly quit to take a job in northwest Montana. Initially, the county was going to pay premiums on a $237,930 life insurance policy for Hyde until age 70 in addition to paying for his health insurance indefinitely. That is no longer the case. Hyde, 59, will receive $89,146 in salary and unused sick leave and vacation pay from a contract that paid him $118,965 a year.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | November 18, 1993
Baltimore Bancorp said yesterday it would do what it has not done in two years pay a quarterly dividend.The dividend, the first since 1991, will come from money left over from $20.9 million of stock sales that had been made primarily to help the company's Bank of Baltimore unit rebuild its recession-battered capital base.The company presented the move as another sign of its recovery from real-estate related loan losses that so depleted the bank's capital that the company last year signed an agreement to let federal regulators supervise operation of the company.
BUSINESS
By Robert Nusgart and Robert Nusgart,SUN STAFF | October 20, 1999
The Maryland Insurance Administration announced yesterday that it will pay $500,000 -- its largest payout ever -- to 171 consumers who lost deposit money when Regency Homes filed for bankruptcy protection in July 1998.The money will come from proceeds of a surety bond that Regency filed with the administration just months before it filed Chapter 7. However, the amount being released represents a little less than half of the $1.02 million that the administration could verify Regency had on deposit.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
For 14 years, police suspected Stephen Cooke in the death of his girlfriend, a theory stoked by the lucrative life insurance payout he received after her death. It wasn't until hours before another man's trial that police say they finally got what they needed to charge him. Baltimore County police said Friday they had charged Cooke, 43, with ordering a hit on 24-year-old Heidi Bernadzikowski at their Dundalk townhouse. The man accused of killing her told investigators that Cooke paid him and another man to carry out the crime.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
A former high-ranking official at the Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs has been accused of running a kickback scheme from his state office, allegedly fabricating military achievements and disability claims in exchange for a cut of the resulting government payouts. According to a federal indictment made public Wednesday, David Clark secured $1.4 million in fraudulent payouts over 16 years. An Army veteran, Clark rose to deputy chief of claims at the state agency before retiring in 2011.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2012
¿ This past winter, Baltimore school officials fervently defended two of the system's most liberal expenses for employee compensation - overtime and leave pay, saying the costs documented their hard work and underscored their commitment to trimming the central office. Using salary data obtained through a Maryland Public Information Act request, The Baltimore Sun found that the system had paid out $14 million in overtime over four years and $64 million in unused vacation, sick and leave pay benefits to employees when they resigned or retired.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
The Baltimore school system spent more than $2.8 million on overtime in fiscal 2010, even though it was doubtful that employees worked all of the hours for which they were paid. Three employees earned a combined $250,000 in salaries while working for both the school system and a state agency during the same hours. And the school system failed to collect nearly $1.5 million in debt dating to 2009, including $336,000 in bonuses paid to employees who hadn't earned them. These are among dozens of findings outlined in a preliminary draft of an independent financial audit of the school system.
NEWS
September 24, 2012
The best news to come out of Capitol Hill last week was largely buried in the back pages. It was the statements made by senior Republicans that if President Barack Obama wins reelection in November, they will retreat in their position on raising taxes on high-earners. Finally, a sign of compromise of some sort. It's hardly a guarantee that Congress will retreat from the looming "fiscal cliff" of massive tax increases and spending cuts that could easily plunge the nation back into an economic recession early next year, but considering how ridiculous and self-destructive the political standoff in Washington has become, it's something.
NEWS
August 14, 2012
Please explain why Baltimore County school "leaders" agreed to pay $150,000 to the two school employees who were given contracts by former Superintendent Joe Hairston if the contract was illegal? (School system agrees to settlement with two employees," Aug. 13.) This makes no sense and is another example of unelected people making decisions for those whose taxes pay the freight! As a taxpayer, I resent this type of activity and expect the county executive to rescind this nonsense or Mr. Hairston to pony up to the county treasury.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | May 25, 1996
Uplifted by record earnings in the initial three months of 1996, troubled developer Interstate General Co. Ltd. Partnership yesterday declared its first quarterly cash dividend in two years.The Charles County development firm, which faces sentencing next month after being convicted of various felony wetlands law violations, will pay shareholders as of June 3 a 6 cents per share dividend on June 13.IGC had not paid a quarterly cash dividend since a 5 cents per unit payout in June 1994.In all, IGC will pay shareholders -- formally called unitholders because of the company's limited partnership status -- a total of $615,400, based on its average number of units outstanding in the first quarter.
BUSINESS
By Peter H. Frank | December 12, 1990
Mercantile Bankshares Corp., bucking an overwhelming trend in the banking industry, voted yesterday to increase its quarterly dividend 7.5 percent, from 20 cents to 21.5 cents a share.It was the 14th consecutive year that the company, parent of Mercantile-Safe Deposit and Trust Co. and 17 other affiliate banks, had raised its quarterly payout to shareholders. The dividend will be paid Dec. 31 to stockholders of record Dec. 21, the company said.Mercantile also said yesterday that Edward K. Dunn Jr., chairman of the board's executive committee at both Mercantile Bankshares and its flagship bank, will replace John H. Mosner Jr. as president of the parent company and vice chairman of the bank's board when Mr. Mosner, who turns 65 early next year, retires March 1.The decision to raise its dividend to 86 cents a year from the current 80 cents further served to place Mercantile among only a handful of the East Coast's largest banks that have survived the real estate and economic downturns with little damage.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
The winner of the 39th annual White Marlin Open in Ocean City is set to receive an estimated prize of $1.4 million after reeling in the only white marlin to qualify in the five-day tournament. William "Bill" Woody, of Pasadena, caught the 72-pound white marlin last Wednesday aboard the Blew Bayou. The payout is expected to be $1,429,092, slightly higher than the payout of $1,394,480.50 made in 2007 for an 83-pound white marlin. Woody caught the only white marlin that met the minimum requirements of measuring at least 67 inches and weighing at least 70 pounds.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
The city's spending panel on Wednesday voted down a $150,000 settlement for the family of a Baltimore teen whom police left shoeless in Howard County - a rare move that came after MayorStephanie Rawlings-Blakeobjected to the deal. "In this case two officers were found guilty of misconduct while in office," Rawlings-Blake said, arguing that taxpayers shouldn't foot the bill for the officers' actions. "Police officers who detained and transported a juvenile outside of the city, leaving him deserted in a wooded area without shoes and socks, are not acting in the scope of their employment.
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