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By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
Even when he's not here, they can't stop talking about Bodemeister. Gutsy runner-up to I'll Have Another at the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes, the colt was never in serious consideration for the Belmont. But his stablemate could finish what Bodemeister couldn't. Paynter, last seen breezing past the field in a race on the Preakness undercard, is the 8-1 fourth choice on the morning line and will start the Belmont from post position No. 9. "[Trainer] Bob Baffert , from Day 1, thought Paynter was the better horse," owner Ahmed Zayat said.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2013
In the midst of a two-game losing skid, and with his Towson women's soccer team on the outside looking in, coach Greg Paynter would not be faulted if he was anxious about the program's hopes of qualifying for the Colonial Athletic Association tournament. But after playing nine of their first 16 games on the road, the Tigers (7-8-1, 2-4 CAA) will conclude their season with three games at home. More importantly, Paynter said he senses a group of players brimming with confidence. “I think we've been battle-tested this season,” he said Tuesday afternoon.
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SPORTS
By Chris Korman | June 10, 2012
Elmont, NY - Paynter stayed where he was, a few feet off the rail, charging toward the finish. Everyone whose heart had been broken by Union Rags before must have had the same thought: he's not going to squeeze through. But then, delivering upon the power and grace that Fair Hill-based trainer Michael Matz had promised, the huge colt saw the inside lane, barged forward and floated over the final feet of the most grueling Triple Crown race, winning the 144th Belmont by a neck on Saturday.
SPORTS
July 29, 2012
Even-money favorite Paynter, who took second in last month's Belmont Stakes, ran away down the stretch to win Sunday's $1 million Haskell Invitational at Monmouth Park in Oceanport, N.J. The victory, in 1 minute, 48.87 seconds, is the third in a row for Hall of Fame trainer Bob Baffert and sixth overall in the 1 1/8-mile, Grade I stakes. Ridden by Rafael Bejarano for the first time, Paynter stumbled at the start and was forced to follow 2-1 second pick Gemologist around the first turn and into the backstretch before taking the lead around the final turn for a 3 3/4-length win over Nonios, followed by Stealcase, Handsome Mike, Dullahan and Gemologist.
SPORTS
July 29, 2012
Even-money favorite Paynter, who took second in last month's Belmont Stakes, ran away down the stretch to win Sunday's $1 million Haskell Invitational at Monmouth Park in Oceanport, N.J. The victory, in 1 minute, 48.87 seconds, is the third in a row for Hall of Fame trainer Bob Baffert and sixth overall in the 1 1/8-mile, Grade I stakes. Ridden by Rafael Bejarano for the first time, Paynter stumbled at the start and was forced to follow 2-1 second pick Gemologist around the first turn and into the backstretch before taking the lead around the final turn for a 3 3/4-length win over Nonios, followed by Stealcase, Handsome Mike, Dullahan and Gemologist.
NEWS
November 19, 2005
Elizabeth B. Paynter, who had been the secretary to the president of the Johns Hopkins University and was later a Rouse Co. manager, died of complications from pneumonia Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. A former resident of the Keswick area of North Baltimore, she was 91. Born Elizabeth Beidler and raised in Oakville, Pa., she moved to Baltimore after attending business school. She worked in the manager's office of the Lord Baltimore Hotel before becoming secretary to George Boas, a Hopkins philosophy professor.
SPORTS
By Bill Free | May 22, 1991
The Washington Capitals traded left wing Bob Joyce, center Tyler Larter and defenseman Kent Paynter to the Winnipeg Jets yesterday for center Simon Wheeldon and left wings Craig Duncanson and Brent Hughes.Wheeldon, 24, Duncanson, 24, and Hughes, 25, finished first, third and fourth, respectively, in scoring last season for Winnipeg's American Hockey League affiliate, the Moncton Hawks.Joyce, 24, Larter, 23, and Paynter, 26, spent most of the 1990-91 season with the Capitals' AHL affiliate, the Baltimore Skipjacks.
NEWS
December 18, 2002
Warren E. Paynter, a retired Baltimore & Ohio Railroad accountant and accomplished woodworker, died of kidney failure Saturday at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 83. Mr. Paynter was born in Baltimore and raised on East Hoffman Street. After graduating from City College in 1935, he went to work in the accounting department of the B&O. He earned an associate's degree in accounting from the University of Baltimore and briefly served in the Army during World War II. After receiving a medical discharge, he worked for the railroad until retiring in 1976.
SPORTS
By Bill Free | May 22, 1991
The Washington Capitals traded left wing Bob Joyce, center Tyler Larter and defenseman Kent Paynter to the Winnipeg Jets yesterday for center Simon Wheeldon and left wings Craig Duncanson and Brent Hughes.Wheeldon, Duncanson and Hughes finished first, third and fourth, respectively, in scoring last season for Winnipeg's American Hockey League affiliate, the Moncton Hawks.Joyce, Larter and Paynter spent most of the 1990-91 season with the Capitals' AHL affiliate, the Baltimore Skipjacks.Joyce, 24, a Winnipeg native, had 10 goals and eight assists in 36 games for the Skipjacks, and three goals and three assists in 17 games with the Capitals.
NEWS
By Glenn Graham and Glenn Graham,Sun reporter | October 24, 2007
It is not surprising setting came naturally to River Hill's Becky Paynter, considering her mother was a setter during her college days at William and Mary. In her second year on varsity, the junior has registered 355 assists (8.9 per game) and leads the Hawks in serving percentage (.970) and aces (59). Paynter started playing volleyball when she was 12 and also plays for the Maryland Juniors Volleyball Club. Over the summer, she spent two weeks in China with her club team and said the experience and training she received have been invaluable in making her a better player.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman | June 10, 2012
Elmont, NY - Paynter stayed where he was, a few feet off the rail, charging toward the finish. Everyone whose heart had been broken by Union Rags before must have had the same thought: he's not going to squeeze through. But then, delivering upon the power and grace that Fair Hill-based trainer Michael Matz had promised, the huge colt saw the inside lane, barged forward and floated over the final feet of the most grueling Triple Crown race, winning the 144th Belmont by a neck on Saturday.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
Even when he's not here, they can't stop talking about Bodemeister. Gutsy runner-up to I'll Have Another at the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes, the colt was never in serious consideration for the Belmont. But his stablemate could finish what Bodemeister couldn't. Paynter, last seen breezing past the field in a race on the Preakness undercard, is the 8-1 fourth choice on the morning line and will start the Belmont from post position No. 9. "[Trainer] Bob Baffert , from Day 1, thought Paynter was the better horse," owner Ahmed Zayat said.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman and The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
In his bid to win horse racing's elusive Triple Crown, I'll Have Another today was named a 4-5 favorite for Saturday's Belmont Stakes. Immediately after the No. 11 post position and odds were announced, I'll Have Another's connections tweeted, "We drew post # 11 -- Brilliant. " Trainer Doug O'Neill said after the draw, "Unbelievable ride. Whole journey is just because of the great I'll Have Another. " O'Neill left minutes later to oversee his horse's acclimation to the new Belmont Stakes Barn.
NEWS
By Glenn Graham and Glenn Graham,Sun reporter | October 24, 2007
It is not surprising setting came naturally to River Hill's Becky Paynter, considering her mother was a setter during her college days at William and Mary. In her second year on varsity, the junior has registered 355 assists (8.9 per game) and leads the Hawks in serving percentage (.970) and aces (59). Paynter started playing volleyball when she was 12 and also plays for the Maryland Juniors Volleyball Club. Over the summer, she spent two weeks in China with her club team and said the experience and training she received have been invaluable in making her a better player.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | September 5, 2007
About 100 sterile Asian oysters that were part of a University of Maryland experiment in the Severn River are missing after a boat anchor smashed into their cage, university officials said yesterday. The oysters were in a huge steel cage in the Severn River, near the Naval Academy -- part of a multimillion-dollar experiment over several years to determine whether Maryland and Virginia should introduce a non-native oyster species into the Chesapeake Bay. Results of the comprehensive study are expected next year.
NEWS
By TOM HOWELL JR | April 12, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A lack of rainfall in the Chesapeake region this year could be a mixed blessing for the bay in coming months, scientists said. Baltimore received 0.18 inches of rain last month, the lowest March rainfall recorded in the city since 1870, when National Weather Service records begin. Rainfall this week did little to make up for low year-to-date regional totals, which can benefit as well as harm bay life. Low precipitation reduces pollutant runoff from land surrounding the bay, but it can also increase salinity in the bay over time, scientists said.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2005
COLLEGE PARK - In the quiet of Kennedy T. Paynter Jr.'s University of Maryland laboratory, Asian and native oysters live together in small tanks - breathing oxygen and eating algae as little blennies dart by hunting for food. Though all seems calm, the research conducted in this tucked-away lab is at the forefront of an increasingly vigorous debate over whether Maryland should put Asian oysters into the Chesapeake Bay. Ever since Maryland announced its intent last year to restore the bay's once-bountiful oyster population by introducing a species native to China, scientists have scrambled to learn about crassostrea ariakensis.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,Sun reporter | September 5, 2007
About 100 sterile Asian oysters that were part of a University of Maryland experiment in the Severn River are missing after a boat anchor smashed into their cage, university officials said yesterday. The oysters were in a huge steel cage in the Severn River, near the Naval Academy -- part of a multimillion-dollar experiment over several years to determine whether Maryland and Virginia should introduce a non-native oyster species into the Chesapeake Bay. Results of the comprehensive study are expected next year.
NEWS
November 19, 2005
Elizabeth B. Paynter, who had been the secretary to the president of the Johns Hopkins University and was later a Rouse Co. manager, died of complications from pneumonia Sunday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. A former resident of the Keswick area of North Baltimore, she was 91. Born Elizabeth Beidler and raised in Oakville, Pa., she moved to Baltimore after attending business school. She worked in the manager's office of the Lord Baltimore Hotel before becoming secretary to George Boas, a Hopkins philosophy professor.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2005
COLLEGE PARK - In the quiet of Kennedy T. Paynter Jr.'s University of Maryland laboratory, Asian and native oysters live together in small tanks - breathing oxygen and eating algae as little blennies dart by hunting for food. Though all seems calm, the research conducted in this tucked-away lab is at the forefront of an increasingly vigorous debate over whether Maryland should put Asian oysters into the Chesapeake Bay. Ever since Maryland announced its intent last year to restore the bay's once-bountiful oyster population by introducing a species native to China, scientists have scrambled to learn about crassostrea ariakensis.
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