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Pay Raise

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BUSINESS
By hanah cho and hanah cho,hanah.cho@baltsun.com | January 9, 2009
Faced with worsening economic conditions, employers are planning to dole out even smaller salary increases this year, according to a new survey. And given the climate, some workers might not see raises at all. HR consulting firm Hewitt Associates found that workers could see an average base pay raise of 3 percent, which is less than the 3.8 percent employers had projected in July. "It's not a pretty picture out there," says Ken Abosch, Hewitt's North American practice leader for compensation consulting.
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NEWS
September 24, 2014
For most of Maryland, David R. Craig might be remembered best as the candidate for governor who finished second to Larry Hogan in the Republican primary earlier this year. But there's another title the outgoing Harford County Executive ought to have wrapped up - the elected official least interested in a pay raise. On Tuesday, Mr. Craig vetoed legislation that would have raised the county executive salary from the current $105,000 (a $90,000 base plus cost-of-living adjustments) to $130,000.
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NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Annapolis Bureau | March 20, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Maryland senators will have to stand up and be counted if they want to keep a $500 pay raise.But it's a vote with an escape hatch. Even if they vote to do without, a note to the bookkeepers will bring the money back."
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
A proposal to give pay raises to the next Anne Arundel County Council and the next county executive will be the subject of a hearing this week. The proposal comes from Councilman Jamie Benoit, who is not running for re-election because of term limits. For the county executive, Benoit's bill would increase the $130,000 salary to $165,000 over four years - an increase of nearly 27 percent. For members of the council, increases for most members would be from $36,000 to $40,518 over four years, which is about a 12 percent raise.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | March 1, 1992
In a region of Maryland where an average year's pay is only half the $35,000 increase Congress gave itself, the standard-bearer of a Maryland political dynasty finds herself under siege.For seven-term Rep. Beverly B. Byron, the congressional pay-raise issue never goes away. In her 6th District, which stretches from Western Maryland to Carroll County and dips down into Howard County, the question has two discomfiting parts."How could you vote yourself a $35,000 raise and then vote against increasing the minimum wage?"
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz | julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | January 6, 2010
Hours after an independent commission on Tuesday recommended a small pay raise for Maryland lawmakers, legislative leaders said in no uncertain terms that they're not interested. The General Assembly Compensation Commission suggested a one-time $2,000 salary bump in 2013 or 2014 if the state's unemployment rate drops to 5 percent or lower. It's now about 7 percent. Most lawmakers make $43,500 yearly; the House speaker and Senate president earn $56,500 each. Commission Chairman Sean W. Glynn said the recommendation reflects the commission's desire to be "sensitive" by balancing current issues, such as pay freezes for state workers, with the fact that they won't meet again until 2014.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
After taking a beating from a handful of critical constituents, members of the Anne Arundel County Council voted Tuesday night not to give a pay raise to the next set of councilmen. The measure to gradually increase the annual salary for the part-time, elected position from $36,000 to $40,518 failed on a 2-5 vote. The votes in favor came from Councilmen Jamie Benoit, a Crownsville Democrat who sponsored the bill, and Dick Ladd, a Broadneck Republican. Neither will return to the council after the election, after Ladd lost his primary and Benoit hit term limits.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2011
Baltimore-based T. Rowe Price Group raised Chief Executive Officer James A.C. Kennedy's total compensation by nearly 51 percent to $7.1 million last year when the company posted record assets under management, net revenue and profit. Kennedy's base salary remained at $350,000, according to the company's proxy filed Friday. His cash bonus rose to $5 million, from $3.3 million in 2009. The value of Kennedy's stock options was $1.7 million, up from $1 million. Other compensation, which includes retirement contributions, matching gifts to charity and other benefits, totaled about $70,000.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
President Barack Obama on Friday proposed a 1 percent raise for civilian federal employees, a move that would end the pay freeze that has been in place for three years as policymakers sought to reduce budget deficits. In a letter to congressional leaders sent at the beginning of the Labor Day weekend, the president wrote that "federal employees have already made significant sacrifices. " He also proposed a 1 percent raise for members of the military. As in the past, pay and benefits for federal employees are ultimately expected to be part of the negotiations on legislation to fund the government later this fall.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2012
Shortly before retiring this summer, Howard County school superintendent Sydney Cousin told employees in the central office that he was giving them a pay raise but did not take the matter before the school board for approval. Some board members say that while it is within the purview of the superintendent to recommend raises for nonunion employees, the board must approve such actions and several criticized what they called a lack of transparency. Cousin, however, said in an interview last week that he believed he followed the correct process.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
After taking a beating from a handful of critical constituents, members of the Anne Arundel County Council voted Tuesday night not to give a pay raise to the next set of councilmen. The measure to gradually increase the annual salary for the part-time, elected position from $36,000 to $40,518 failed on a 2-5 vote. The votes in favor came from Councilmen Jamie Benoit, a Crownsville Democrat who sponsored the bill, and Dick Ladd, a Broadneck Republican. Neither will return to the council after the election, after Ladd lost his primary and Benoit hit term limits.
NEWS
April 6, 2014
It appears that Maryland lawmakers think that Maryland voters work for them; they have raised taxes and fees 80 times on Gov. Martin O'Malley's watch ( "House rejects bid to block pay raises," April 1) There are a lot of Marylanders who work full-time jobs and make less than $43,500 dollars a year. In the private sector the employer, like Maryland voters, decides if an employee deserves a raise. Let's not forget that if these lawmakers are so unhappy with their salaries, why do they spend millions of dollars to get elected and re-elected?
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Democrats in the House of Delegates sidetracked a Republican attempt Tuesday to force a vote on a 16 percent pay raise for lawmakers – virtually assuring the pay hike will take effect without a vote. The House voted 87-48 to defeat a procedural move by Del. Cathleen M. Vitale, an Anne Arundel County Republican, to bring her resolution blocking the raise to the floor. The motion required 94 votes to pass. Only a handful of Democratic delegates, including gubernatorial candidate Heather R. Mizeur, joined a united Republican caucus in supporting the move.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
How easy it is to rail against the salaries of elected officials. Embedded deeply in the human psyche is the near-certainty that somewhere, somehow the people who hold public office are getting away with unarmed robbery. It's a suspicion that's easy to play on, while proving the reverse — that a taxpayer-financed pay raise might actually be overdue and a worthy investment — is a tough sell under the best of circumstances. And while we can't argue that everyone who holds such positions deserves their pay, what we do know is that the General Assembly Compensation Commission makes a good case for why Maryland's elected leaders ought to be paid more beginning next year.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | February 18, 2014
Republican gubernatorial candidate David R. Craig released a plan Tuesday would put Maryland on a "glide path" toward eliminating its state income tax while cutting total spending by a minimum of 3 percent a year. Craig, who has been Harford County executive for the past decade, said such a move would stimulate economic growth and halt a loss of population to states with lower taxes. "We must restore Maryland to the way it was and we need a governor who knows how to do it," he said.
NEWS
January 9, 2014
In the Towson Times Crime Log section of Jan. 1, it seems to this reader that an item was missed. That item was the subject of the editorial on Page 11 of the same issue date. The title, "Lawmakers voting themselves a pay raise may look unseemly" Again, to this reader, the rate of pay increase seems unjustified, and could be considered "Grand Larceny" against the taxpayers of Baltimore County. This should have been posted in Crime Log. Peter J. Schap Jr. Cockeysville To respond to this editorial, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2010
Baltimore Fire Chief James Clack will seek pay increases next week for his top commanders, arguing that he is struggling to attract and retain leaders. Clack said he is proposing a formula that would make pay for his eight deputy chiefs and one assistant chief 15 percent more than the pay of battalion chiefs, who are unionized. Because top commanders cannot earn overtime, some earn less than battalion chiefs, he said. When two deputy chief positions opened recently, there were no internal applicants, forcing Clack to hire civilians.
NEWS
August 10, 1995
Maybe Superintendent Walter G. Amprey forgot the negotiating was over. According to Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, the superintendent was blowing smoke when he wailed that programs in the schools would have to be cut to give teachers a 5 percent raise in their new contract.The mayor said yesterday city negotiators had placed a 4 percent increase on the bargaining table several months ago, with the understanding that the raise could go up to 5 percent if Education Alternatives Inc. agreed to a new contract that reduced its fee for running nine Tesseract schools.
NEWS
December 18, 2013
With public approval ratings for most political figures suffering these days - Congress is hovering around 9 percent, an all-time low - and unemployment still relatively high, it's probably not the best time for elected officials of any kind to seek a pay raise. Yet legislative salaries are now under review in Annapolis and are likely to become an issue in the upcoming legislative session. Lawmaker pay is an easy target for criticism. Rare is the voter who is left wide awake at night fretting that his delegate or state senator is paid too little.
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