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Pay Increases

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NEWS
BY SUN STAFF WRITERS | February 13, 2003
County Executive Janet S. Owens plans to cut cost-of-living increases for thousands of employees, including public safety unions and all Board of Education employees, her spokeswoman said yesterday. Spokeswoman Jody Hedeman Couser attributed the cuts to projected revenue shortfalls and expected state budget cuts. "In light of the current financial situation, pay increases and all pending capital projects are continuously under review for affordability," Couser said. Aside from Board of Education employees, those affected will be the sheriff's deputies of Teamsters Local 103; American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees Local 2563; International Association of Fire Fighters Local 1563; the Anne Arundel County Police Sergeants Association; and Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 70. It is unclear how much the cuts will save the county for the next fiscal year, which will begin July 1, Couser said.
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NEWS
By Erica L. Green and By Erica L. Green | January 30, 2014
The Baltimore Teachers Union announced Tuesday a tentative contract that would give city teachers a 1 percent raise every year until 2016 and revise a career ladder introduced in 2010 that allowed teachers to move up the pay ladder faster. According to the agreement, which can be viewed here,  teachers will receive an automatic 1 percent pay raise next month, in addition to 1 percent raises in July 2014 and July 2015. The union's health care also stays intact. Teachers are still eligible to earn more money by moving up four levels of career pathways -- standard, professional, model and lead -- as they accumulate credits called "achievement units.
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NEWS
By Monica Norton and Monica Norton,Staff Writer | January 21, 1993
Anne Arundel School Superintendent C. Berry Carter II last night proposed a $380.9 million spending plan for the next school year that he said would not come close to providing for all the system's needs.The spending plan seeks funding for 10 new teachers but provides no pay increases for school system employees for the third year in a row."There is a 9 percent increase above the current budget," Mr. Carter told the school board. "But this does not, by any stretch of the imagination, mine or yours or anyone else's, include all of the things we want."
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2013
Many Maryland hospital and health system CEOs received pay increases in recent years even as they complained of shrinking profit margins and warned of cutbacks unless they could increase the rates they charge. Eleven executives earning seven-figure compensation packages including salary, bonus, retirement and other pay saw their total pay rise from as little as 0.13 percent to as much as 308 percent in the fiscal year that ended in 2012, according to tax filings. Another executive earning more than $1 million saw a pay cut. Some of the larger compensation increases included retirement benefits earned over years of service that were reported as income under new tax rules.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and By Erica L. Green | January 30, 2014
The Baltimore Teachers Union announced Tuesday a tentative contract that would give city teachers a 1 percent raise every year until 2016 and revise a career ladder introduced in 2010 that allowed teachers to move up the pay ladder faster. According to the agreement, which can be viewed here,  teachers will receive an automatic 1 percent pay raise next month, in addition to 1 percent raises in July 2014 and July 2015. The union's health care also stays intact. Teachers are still eligible to earn more money by moving up four levels of career pathways -- standard, professional, model and lead -- as they accumulate credits called "achievement units.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | August 17, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Growth in U.S. employees' wages and salaries accelerated this year for the first time since 1990, according to an annual survey.The survey, done by the Scottsdale, Ariz.-based American Compensation Association, showed that the rate of pay increases climbed to 4.3 percent in 1996 from 4.1 percent in 1995."Companies have been re-engineering to take certain costs out of their systems," said Wallace Nichols, the association's executive director. As part of this effort, he said, companies have instituted variable pay plans that "produced bonuses for employees" and led to the faster overall growth.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2004
Southwest Airlines and the union representing 7,400 of its flight attendants have reached a tentative contract agreement, ending a more than two-year deadlock. Details of the proposed contract between Southwest, the dominant carrier at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, and the Transport Workers Union Local 556 have not been released. Thom McDaniel, president of Transport Workers Union Local 556, said the deal provided bigger pay raises than the company's last offer in February, which included less than 3 percent annual pay increases for 6 1/2 years.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | July 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Federal union representatives attacked yesterday a Clinton administration proposal to eliminate all pay increases for federal workers who perform poorly, calling it unfair and counterproductive.The proposal by the Office of Personnel Management to deny all pay increases to workers who receive poor evaluations would be "punitive," said John Sturdivant, president of the American Federation of Government Employees.Under the proposal, federal workers -- including 300,000 who live in Maryland -- would not receive cost of living adjustments or so-called locality increases, which are designed to eliminate the gap between public and private sector pay in different regions of the country.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | December 11, 2008
Mayor Sheila Dixon plans to keep a $3,700 pay raise despite a public outcry and pledges from some City Council members to return or donate their equivalent cost-of-living adjustments. Asked yesterday whether she would give the raise to charity, Dixon said at a news conference: "To be honest with you, no, 2 1/2 percent, based on what I do seven days a week, 24 hours [a day], trying to raise a family, a daughter in college." The mayor will now make $151,700 yearly.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
State Treasurer Richard N. Dixon said yesterday that he is likely to oppose a series of pay raises for Gov. Parris N. Glendening's senior staff members when the increases come before the Board of Public Works tomorrow.Dixon, one of three members of the board, said the raises exceed General Assembly guidelines limiting such increases to 6 percent."More than 6 percent, I'm going to vote against -- that's the standard set by the legislature," said Dixon, who represents the General Assembly on the board.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
Mayo A. Shattuck IlI -- who successfully engineered the sale of Constellation Energy Group to Chicago-based Exelon Corp. – took in $17.3 million in total compensation last year, a nearly 11 percent increase from 2010. Shattuck's base salary of $1.3 million was unchanged from a year earlier. He received no cash incentive payment last year, compared with a $1.7 million payout in 2010. The compensation package, which the company reported Friday, includes additional payouts in stocks, options and the value of his pension.
NEWS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
Compensation for T. Rowe Price Group's top executives went up last year, the Baltimore money manager reported Thursday. Chief Executive Officer and President James A.C. Kennedy's total package rose 10.5 percent to $7.9 million in 2011. Kennedy's base salary remained at $350,000, according to the company's proxy. His cash bonus rose to $5.5 million, from $5 million in 2010. The value of his stock options was $1.96 million, up from $1.7 million. Other compensation, which includes retirement contributions, matching charitable contributions and other benefits, totaled about $70,800, a slight increase from a year earlier.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2010
Legg Mason Inc. reported Wednesday that its chief executive's pay package rose more than $500,000 in the past fiscal year as the Baltimore money manager staged a turnaround of its finances. Chairman and CEO Mark R. Fetting's compensation totaled $4.6 million for the year ending March 31, up 12 percent from $4.1 million for fiscal 2009, according to a regulatory filing. Fetting's package included $500,000 in base salary and a $950,000 cash bonus — the same amounts he received in the previous year.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com and Baltimore Sun reporter | March 23, 2010
The city's top officials are scheduled to vote on automatic pay raises for themselves tomorrow — the same day that Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake is slated to unveil a grim budget that includes deep cuts to city services. But the mayor, Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young and Comptroller Joan Pratt said they plan to decline the raises and to have the money deducted from their pay checks and returned to the city's general fund. "Because of the economic and financial difficulties that we're facing in the city of Baltimore, I think it's only right that we give it back," said Young.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | April 26, 2009
County Executive John R. Leopold has withdrawn his request for the state to waive a requirement for the county to pay up to an additional $9 million in funding for public schools next fiscal year. The state's "maintenance of effort" law requires local governments to increase spending on schools each year to qualify for state education funding. The state allowed the jurisdictions to request a waiver to that requirement by March 31. Leopold, along with county council Chairman Edward R. Reilly, submitted a letter to State Board of Education President James H. DeGraffenreidt Jr. at the end of March explaining that funding the maintenance of effort could "seriously impair" other county services.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | April 25, 2009
State and federal officials announced Friday that they are sweetening payments to Maryland farmers in hopes of taking cropland out of production to help clean the Chesapeake Bay. Meeting on a farm near Westminster, Gov. Martin O'Malley and U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack signed an agreement to funnel $198 million in federal funds to the state over the next 15 years. The money will allow the government to increase payments to farmers to plant trees rather than crops along streams.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2002
The Anne Arundel County school board approved yesterday a teachers' contract that provides the biggest pay increases to new and veteran educators, while also giving an across-the-board 1 percent raise to all teachers. The two-year contract, which takes effect July 1, pays first-year teachers an annual salary of $33,347, up from $32,167 this year. The increase doesn't put Anne Arundel in the same league with its wealthier neighbors, but officials say it will keep the county competitive.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | February 20, 1991
Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden has ordered 4 percent pay increases for all county department heads and their staffs to match a negotiated raise that county merit employees received Jan. 1.The raises will cost the county between $40,000 and $50,000 a year. The pay for the top tier of county department heads will be increased by $2,700 to $70,304, and the second tier by $2,400 to $65,978.Hayden should more than recoup the expense with an ordered $100,000 cut in the county tourism office and the firing of its $46,000-a-year director, Susan Steckman.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | February 22, 2009
The Howard County school system and the union that represents most of its employees resumed contract negotiations last week on the heels of congressional approval of a federal stimulus package that is expected to influence the proposals of both sides. Though the economy is in recession and state and county budgets are being squeezed, many members say the union that represents Howard teachers and school staff members should press for a pay increase. "We're all suffering," said Karen Covington, a teacher at Long Reach High School.
BUSINESS
By hanah cho and hanah cho,hanah.cho@baltsun.com | January 9, 2009
Faced with worsening economic conditions, employers are planning to dole out even smaller salary increases this year, according to a new survey. And given the climate, some workers might not see raises at all. HR consulting firm Hewitt Associates found that workers could see an average base pay raise of 3 percent, which is less than the 3.8 percent employers had projected in July. "It's not a pretty picture out there," says Ken Abosch, Hewitt's North American practice leader for compensation consulting.
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