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NEWS
July 10, 2009
Do you think the media attention given to Michael Jackson's death has been excessive? Yes 84% No 15% Not sure 1% (1,342 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Would you be willing to pay higher taxes to provide guaranteed, universal health insurance coverage to all Americans? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
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BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | September 20, 2011
President Obama is proposing to raise taxes on millionaires in what's called the Buffett Rule. Billionaire Warren Buffett begged Congress to raise taxes on people like him, noting his tax rate is lower than his secretary's. Such a millionaire tax would affect 0.3 percent of the population.  Not enough to make a significant dent in the deficit, but certainly every bit can help.   Republicans, however, balk at requiring millionaires to pay more, saying they are job creators.  (If they are, we need them to step up their efforts.)
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | October 3, 1992
The Bush campaign put on the air this week two new TV ads that are designed to undermine support for Democrat Bill Clinton, rather than promote a positive message about Mr. Bush. The more controversial of the two is a 30-second spot challenging Mr. Clinton's claim that he will raise taxes only on the rich.SCRIPT: A female narrator says: "Bill Clinton says he'll only tax the rich to pay for his campaign promises. But here's what Clinton economics could mean to you." A man identified as steamfitter John Canes appears on the screen, and the narrator says: "$1,088 more in taxes."
NEWS
July 10, 2009
Do you think the media attention given to Michael Jackson's death has been excessive? Yes 84% No 15% Not sure 1% (1,342 votes, results not scientific) Next poll: : Would you be willing to pay higher taxes to provide guaranteed, universal health insurance coverage to all Americans? Vote at baltimoresun.com/vote
NEWS
By Harold Jackson | November 29, 1998
'Tis the season to be carefulFa la la lala la la la laEasy credit can be harmfulFa la la lala la la la laOK, so I'm not Ira Gershwin. But you get the message from my feeble attempt at writing song lyrics. With the official start of the holiday shopping season, all of us must take care not to overextend ourselves buying on credit.Bills can be set aside, but eventually they must be paid. When you buy gifts on credit, you have to gauge your ability to pay the bills when they come due.Howard County's new leaders, who will be sworn in next week, must be mindful of the same thing.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Sun Staff Writer | November 4, 1994
With the election only five days away, the candidates for governor yesterday charged each other with 11th-hour switches on the environment and taxes.In dueling press conferences in Anne Arundel County, Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey said Democrat Parris N. Glendening had gone through a "death-bed conversion" to become a would-be tax-cutter, while he derided her attempt to cast herself as an environmentalist."
NEWS
By John Morris and John Morris,Staff writer | November 27, 1991
In a twist on the popular fast food commercial, county residents areasking, "Where's the fat?"State political leaders have slashed $446 million from Maryland's $11.5 billion budget this year. But, "They are not looking for the little bits of fat," said Brooklyn Park resident Linda Sharp.As Gov. William Donald Schaefer grapples with another $200 million deficit this month, Sharp's concern was echoed again and again Tuesday night at a Glen Burnie forum on the budget crisis and at other recent forums in Pasadena and Arnold.
NEWS
December 5, 1996
Virtual taxes only seem too highThe Sun (Nov. 27) reported that business at soup kitchens is thriving. At the same time, business and political leaders in Maryland are clamoring for a reduction in the state personal income tax rate.They say that Maryland is perceived to have high taxes, and that cutting the personal income tax will change this perception and stimulate economic growth.Most of those business and political leaders also agree that, in reality, Maryland's taxes are not high when compared with those of other states.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | October 26, 1990
WE INTERRUPT our regular programming to go to the White House for a live broadcast of a presidential press conference. It is now in progress.Mr. President, have you decided how high a tax increase for the rich you will accept?"
NEWS
November 28, 1990
Taxpayers won't abide Linowes planIn response to your "Waiting for Linowes" editorial (Nov. 20), you say that the Linowes Commission proposals would "ensure that those with a greater ability to pay are asked to pay more" to help the poorer jurisdictions. Where did you get the word "asked"? No one is going to ask anyone to pay higher taxes. W are going to be forced to pay more at a time when many cannoafford it.You say the issue is "fairness." Well, confiscatory taxation isn't fair. The poorer jurisdictions have a problem, but taxing the rest of the state into a depression isn't going to benefit the majority of citizens.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2004
More than two-thirds of Maryland voters say they would be willing to pay an additional penny sales tax for improving schools, despite the staunch anti-tax stance being taken by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., a new poll for The Sun released today shows. To close the state's projected $736 million budget gap - an ever-higher priority for those surveyed - a majority of voters oppose just putting programs on the chopping block. Instead, more than one-third say it should be accomplished only by raising taxes; 20 percent say tax increases and program cutbacks must be done in tandem to get the job done.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 14, 2000
WASHINGTON - Congressional Republicans are hurrying to finish work on their major election-year tax-cut proposals before the presidential nominating conventions this summer in hopes of showcasing the issue should President Clinton follow through on his veto threats. The Senate is expected to vote today to approve a House-passed measure that would eliminate within 10 years the federal tax on estates worth more than $675,000. Only about 2 percent of Americans have estates large enough to be taxed.
NEWS
By Harold Jackson | November 29, 1998
'Tis the season to be carefulFa la la lala la la la laEasy credit can be harmfulFa la la lala la la la laOK, so I'm not Ira Gershwin. But you get the message from my feeble attempt at writing song lyrics. With the official start of the holiday shopping season, all of us must take care not to overextend ourselves buying on credit.Bills can be set aside, but eventually they must be paid. When you buy gifts on credit, you have to gauge your ability to pay the bills when they come due.Howard County's new leaders, who will be sworn in next week, must be mindful of the same thing.
NEWS
December 5, 1996
Virtual taxes only seem too highThe Sun (Nov. 27) reported that business at soup kitchens is thriving. At the same time, business and political leaders in Maryland are clamoring for a reduction in the state personal income tax rate.They say that Maryland is perceived to have high taxes, and that cutting the personal income tax will change this perception and stimulate economic growth.Most of those business and political leaders also agree that, in reality, Maryland's taxes are not high when compared with those of other states.
NEWS
By A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 13, 1996
Annapolis lost its legal fight yesterday against top Anne Arundel officials, ending six weeks of charged politics and posturing while virtually assuring that city residents will pay higher property taxes come July 1.Subtly condemning the debate's political undertones, Anne Arundel Circuit Judge James C. Cawood Jr., paraphrased the late sports writer Grantland Rice to set out his decision: "Our duty in the current dispute is to determine 'how appropriately they...
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Sun Staff Writer | November 4, 1994
With the election only five days away, the candidates for governor yesterday charged each other with 11th-hour switches on the environment and taxes.In dueling press conferences in Anne Arundel County, Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey said Democrat Parris N. Glendening had gone through a "death-bed conversion" to become a would-be tax-cutter, while he derided her attempt to cast herself as an environmentalist."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 14, 2000
WASHINGTON - Congressional Republicans are hurrying to finish work on their major election-year tax-cut proposals before the presidential nominating conventions this summer in hopes of showcasing the issue should President Clinton follow through on his veto threats. The Senate is expected to vote today to approve a House-passed measure that would eliminate within 10 years the federal tax on estates worth more than $675,000. Only about 2 percent of Americans have estates large enough to be taxed.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and Marina Sarris and John W. Frece and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writers | April 17, 1994
When Maryland's General Assembly ended its 90-day session Monday night, it was as if lawmakers consciously tried to capsulize their four-year term in one long, final day.They killed any bill too complicated or controversial. They buried anything that might interfere with their re-election plans. They passed a handful of "feel-good" measures that neither did much nor hurt anyone.When the midnight adjournment arrived and confetti was dumped on the presiding officers, an epitaph for members of the legislative class of 1991-1994 could have been written: "They treaded water."
NEWS
By John W. Frece and Marina Sarris and John W. Frece and Marina Sarris,Sun Staff Writers | April 17, 1994
When Maryland's General Assembly ended its 90-day session Monday night, it was as if lawmakers consciously tried to capsulize their four-year term in one long, final day.They killed any bill too complicated or controversial. They buried anything that might interfere with their re-election plans. They passed a handful of "feel-good" measures that neither did much nor hurt anyone.When the midnight adjournment arrived and confetti was dumped on the presiding officers, an epitaph for members of the legislative class of 1991-1994 could have been written: "They treaded water."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | October 3, 1992
The Bush campaign put on the air this week two new TV ads that are designed to undermine support for Democrat Bill Clinton, rather than promote a positive message about Mr. Bush. The more controversial of the two is a 30-second spot challenging Mr. Clinton's claim that he will raise taxes only on the rich.SCRIPT: A female narrator says: "Bill Clinton says he'll only tax the rich to pay for his campaign promises. But here's what Clinton economics could mean to you." A man identified as steamfitter John Canes appears on the screen, and the narrator says: "$1,088 more in taxes."
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