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NEWS
March 18, 2013
"All good things have to come to an end" is an old adage that still rings true. The Baltimore Ravens just won the Super Bowl and united this region, but the breakup began when the "business of the sport" became more important than the need to retain the players that made the team's win possible If only the feeling of being on top of the mountain could have lasted until next season. But Joe Flacco gets a new $150 million contract, and we not only ask Anquan Boldin to take a $2 million pay cut but are ordered to be quiet about it because this is how the game works.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
Baltimore's police union Tuesday night approved a contract that increases officer pay by 13 percent and reorganizes the department to add 300 officers available for emergencies, its president said. Of the nearly two-thirds of officers who voted, 86.4 percent approved the new agreement, Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 3 President Robert F. Cherry said. The deal will cut vacant positions from the department while raising officer pay. The pay raises, some of which are retroactive, will go into effect across the board by mid-2015, in response to officers' top complaint in a recent in-house survey.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2011
Baltimore police officers got what they described as a stunning note accompanying their biweekly paychecks Friday — a memo from City Hall informing them that their pay will be cut by nearly 2 percent over the next six months. That means the average officer will see about $205 less in monthly pay starting Jan. 21. "Baltimore City will never be safe as long as the mayor continues to show her disrespect to the police," said Robert F. Cherry, president of the Fraternal Order of Police.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2013
As the federal health reform known as Obamacare takes hold, many community colleges in Maryland and across the country are capping the hours of adjunct faculty — who make up the bulk of their teaching force — to avoid paying for the instructors' health insurance. The limits put the adjunct teachers on the leading edge of fallout from the Affordable Care Act, whose critics predict that a range of employers will increasingly rely on part-timers to sidestep insurance requirements that go into effect in 2015.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
The vast majority of civilian defense employees face a 20 percent pay cut from April through September if looming federal budget reductions aren't averted, a move that will hit Maryland harder than almost every other state, the Pentagon warned Wednesday. The Department of Defense notified Congress that affected employees would be furloughed without pay one day a week for 22 weeks. The agency estimated a $359 million hit to the paychecks of those working in Maryland - trailing only Virginia and California.
FEATURES
By Deborah L. Jacobs and Deborah L. Jacobs,CHRONICLE FEATURES | March 31, 1996
The shrinking job market for middle managers has forced many downsized workers to consider taking a pay cut. People who used to make $45,000 a year are applying for jobs in the $30,000 range. Getting an offer seems like a mixed blessing -- you wonder if you'd be better off turning it down.As if the emotional roller coaster weren't bad enough, the prospect of a pay cut poses tough financial and practical questions:How long should I hold out for the salary I want?If you have a buyout package to fall back on, you might be tempted to wait until your severance pay runs out. In fact, it's much better to start bringing in some money as soon as possible.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Sun Staff Writer | September 3, 1994
Guard Mark Schlereth, who came back from a rare illness to win back his starting job in training camp with the Washington Redskins, became the latest veteran to agree to take a pay cut yesterday.Schlereth, who was due to make a $750,000 base salary with a $100,000 roster bonus, was waived ater agreeing to a reduction.As a vested veteran, he can't be claimed by another team and will resign with the Redskins today.General manager Charley Casserly declined to comment on the reasons for the reduction, although the team apparently is attempting to build a reserve fund in case they need to replace injured playersThe Redskins reduced the salaries of guard Vernice Smith $100,000 and cornerback A.J. Johnson $120,000 in the past week.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | March 16, 1993
NEW YORK -- A $5 billion loss, massive staffing cutbacks and a plummeting stock price meant a pay cut last year for IBM boss John F. Akers -- from $1.57 million to $1.3 million.The modest 17 percent cut was disclosed yesterday in International Business Machines Corp.'s 1992 proxy, which showed that the outgoing chief executive officer's base salary stayed at $925,000, while his bonus was cut to $375,000 last year from $650,000 in 1991, when the company lost $2 billion.Although Mr. Akers is due to leave shortly, he was renominated by the computer maker to serve on the board of directors for a 10th year.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | September 16, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A Social Security Administration executive who stands to lose $5,200 a year under a pay cut proposed by President Bush, says he's willing to make the sacrifice.But the SSA executive is willing only if well-paid private sector workers share the burden.The executive, who did not want his name used, said he would accept the proposed 5 percent pay cut because he is worried that the huge federal deficit could lower the standard of living of his two young children. People like him who are well off should shoulder more of the cost of reducing the deficit, he said.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | March 1, 1995
It was a tough year for Bell Atlantic Corp. Chairman Raymond W. Smith in 1994. First his $30 billion merger deal with Telecommunications Inc. falls apart. Then he takes an 18 percent pay cut, to a lousy $2 million.At least he can console himself with the 948,180 stock options he received.The Philadelphia-based telephone company's recently filed proxy statement shows that Mr. Smith received a modest 4.1 percent raise in May -- an amount that was in line with the company's budgeted 4 percent merit pay increase pool.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2013
Baltimore fire union president Rick Hoffman blasted the city administration Tuesday for not giving firefighters the 2 percent raises all other city union employees will get, after months of staying silent on the issue amid ongoing arbitration. Hoffman made note of the city's recent violent crime wave as evidence that firefighters deserve a raise, saying that members of the Fire Department, who also handle medical calls, are the ones who take shooting victims to the hospital and wash the blood off the street after the police leave.
NEWS
March 18, 2013
"All good things have to come to an end" is an old adage that still rings true. The Baltimore Ravens just won the Super Bowl and united this region, but the breakup began when the "business of the sport" became more important than the need to retain the players that made the team's win possible If only the feeling of being on top of the mountain could have lasted until next season. But Joe Flacco gets a new $150 million contract, and we not only ask Anquan Boldin to take a $2 million pay cut but are ordered to be quiet about it because this is how the game works.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
The vast majority of civilian defense employees face a 20 percent pay cut from April through September if looming federal budget reductions aren't averted, a move that will hit Maryland harder than almost every other state, the Pentagon warned Wednesday. The Department of Defense notified Congress that affected employees would be furloughed without pay one day a week for 22 weeks. The agency estimated a $359 million hit to the paychecks of those working in Maryland - trailing only Virginia and California.
NEWS
December 8, 2012
Accompanying your story about impending tax hikes and budget cuts was a front-page picture of an Obama supporter complaining about having to work hard at her Social Security job ("On the brink of the 'fiscal cliff,'" Dec. 6). Perhaps she should join the private sector to find out what real work actually is. What you didn't report is whether she and whoever else was protesting had taken personal leave to express their feelings or whether they were "on the clock," so to speak, as they publicly complained about being expected "to do more.
BUSINESS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2012
Federal employees in Maryland and elsewhere stepped up pressure on Congress Wednesday to avert the looming fiscal crisis without making significant cuts to government pay and benefits. In rallies across the country and in a new ad campaign running in Washington, federal employee unions noted concessions that members have made toward deficit reduction and sought to counter a growing sense of inevitability that they will nevertheless be asked to do more. The latest public relations blitz by federal employees - who make up about 10 percent of Maryland's civilian workforce - came as the Obama administration and Republicans in the House of Representatives continued to talk past one another over how to avoid the year-end combination of tax increases and deep, automatic spending cuts known as the "fiscal cliff.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
It's been a difficult year politically for federal workers. It's about to get worse. As Congress scrambles for solutions to looming automatic spending cuts and expiring tax breaks, lawmakers and budget experts say the federal workforce is sure to be targeted to pay for year-end legislation needed to keep the nation from careening off the so-called fiscal cliff. The scope of the proposals will hinge on the results of the election in November, but few doubt that the cuts will come in some form.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | March 28, 1995
After a long-awaited breakthrough in crucial negotiations, the leaders of USAir's pilot union are due to vote today on a cost-cutting package that could save the airline nearly $190 million a year for the next five years.The agreement provides for a 20 percent pay cut for pilots, or $150 million a year over the next five years, plus $40 million in other concessions, according to David W. McLarney, a spokesman for the pilot union.The deadlock in the negotiations was broken after the pilot union agreed to let the company furlough up to 300 pilots over two years, the New York Times reported yesterday.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | September 18, 1991
County Council member Paul R. Farragut, D-4th, is asking for a $7,125 pay cut in his $27,500-a-year council salary, saying it is "only right" since county employees are not receiving a pay increase this year.Farragut said Monday he plans to give about another $2,000 of his salary to the United Way of Central Maryland."I am personally comfortable yet I see a lot of pain and suffering," Farragut said. "The state and the county are obviously in a stateof stress. I share that sense of pain."Farragut said his requestto return the money is a personal decision influenced by three events he has been thinking about for several days.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
The new owner of the Sparrows Point steel mill has agreed to pay a $135,000 penalty and resolve alleged violations of state pollution control laws that occurred in 2009 when part of a blast furnace ignited, state officials announced Thursday. RG Steel Sparrows LLC, which purchased Sparrows Point in April, has signed an agreement with the Maryland Department of the Environment, or MDE, and the Maryland Office of the Attorney General to reduce emissions from the blast furnace. The money will go to the Maryland Clean Air Fund.
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