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NEWS
June 25, 2013
The major news stories over the weekend were all about the 18 people shot and six killed in black-on-black crime in Baltimore, yet there were no words from the mayor or any other city officials. ("Eight killed in bloody weekend," June 24.) When I hear that "crime in Baltimore is down," I wonder if those in city government are just used to lying to everyone or whether they simply don't care. I also wonder whether the public has gotten so used to the violence that they don't care either.
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NEWS
May 21, 2014
The centrist shift of the Republican Party, first observed last fall with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's landslide re-election, continued this week with GOP establishment candidates defeating tea party challengers in primary races. The most visible was Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell's trouncing of a conservative opponent who was once running ahead of him in polls. Mr. McConnell is nobody's moderate, but he's no tea party absolutist either. What he represents — and what voters in Kentucky clearly endorsed — is an establishment Republican, the kind who believes in lower taxes and smaller government but not in shutting down the federal government or other forms of self-destructive behavior in the cause of extremism.
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NEWS
By LYN DEAN | January 4, 1993
I wonder if there is a name for the speeded up perception of time that settles upon us as we get older? I'm sure that 1992 didn't really go by any faster than, say, 1956 or 1973, but it certainly seemed to. It might be explained, for me, by the vast amount of change in my life last year, but shouldn't the reverse be true? Shouldn't a lot of difference make one pay attention and really experience what's going on?If the thought is mother to the deed, I guess I do have one resolution for 1993: to pay attention as I build on the changes of '92. It probably won't slow down my perception of the year's passage, but perhaps I won't find myself saying, "What happened to October and November?"
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
Carrie O'Connor thought she was a fairly healthy 35-year-old who went on daily jogs and ate well. Then, more than a year ago, she suffered back-to-back heart attacks. The first hit while she was treating herself to baubles at Smyth Jewelers in Timonium. The project manager at T. Rowe Price suddenly felt nauseated and severe pain consumed her stomach. Pain shot up her arm and her jaw ached. All were common symptoms of a heart attack, the paramedics later told her. The second happened later that day when doctors tried to insert a stent to open a blocked left artery they believed had caused the first attack.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | January 22, 2001
Cheer up. It's a new century, millennium, administration and day. Explain again, for our California readers, how power deregulation benefits them. Pay attention to what Parris says. It turns out, he's staying. Re-branded Britain is going to ban fox-hunting first. Next it will go after grouse shooting, then clotted cream. Be patriotic. Buy lots of stupid purple sweatshirts.
BUSINESS
October 29, 1990
* Discard your stereotypes of older folks. They're not poor, feeble and unsophisticated. And they're not unyielding to change.* Pay attention to focus groups and other qualitative research that samples attitudes, interests and lifestyles. It may be more revealing than research based simply on age, income and other statistics.* In advertising, downplay aging. Don't portray older folks as inactive. Emphasize vitality. Design ads that blend several age groups together.* Emphasize value. Quality, not price, often is the deciding factor on a purchase.
SPORTS
December 14, 2006
On the Ravens' Jamal Lewis Anyone who thinks that Jamal isn't getting it done needs to pay attention and watch [Sunday's] game again. He was gouging that defense. Not great, but he has been effective enough to keep the hounds off McNair and to sustain some clock-eating drives when we needed them. He is adequate. He is no longer dominant or a beast or shredding or any superlative that you would like to use to describe him.
SPORTS
By Jason LaCanfora | October 3, 1996
Cleveland Indians manager Mike Hargrove responded emphatically yesterday to remarks made by Orioles first base coach John Stearns about a play made by Indians right fielder Manny Ramirez on Tuesday.Stearns said after Game 1 that he did not think Ramirez knew Orioles catcher Chris Hoiles was tagging up at third base when Ramirez caught Roberto Alomar's shallow fly ball to right field in the sixth inning of a tie game, but did not throw home to challenge the slow-running catcher."I think John Stearns would do well probably to pay attention to his own club," Hargrove told ESPN before yesterday's game.
NEWS
February 14, 2007
Before the members of the House of Representatives had even begun their three days' worth of soliloquies on Iraq, President Bush declared that he didn't plan to pay attention. That's his right, no doubt, and it's certainly not unprecedented. There's plenty that he's chosen not to pay attention to since he moved into the Oval Office - as the perjury trial of I. Lewis "Scooter" Libby, in its own peculiar way, helps to illustrate, because it gets back to the way the White House reacted to evidence that there might not be weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | March 31, 2002
Take My Advice: Letter to the Next Generation from People Who Know a Thing or Two, edited by James L. Harmon (Simon & Schuster, 254 pages, $18). Over some 10 years, Harmon, an Oregon writer, bedeviled strangers with well-known names for advice. He kept the responses, wrapped them together and produced this book. Most notable for the outrageous presumptuousness of the project, it is the sort of volume that is best read in snippets in the smallest room of the house. The bits of advice run from a few words to several pages -- from acidly sardonic to posturingly pompous.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | December 23, 2013
When Dennis Pitta caught six passes for 48 yards and a touchdown in his return to the field in Week 14, it was seen as a sign of big things to come for the Ravens tight end. But over his past two games, Pitta has just six receptions on 11 targets -- as many as he had three weeks ago against the Minnesota Vikings. Teams know that quarterback Joe Flacco likes to look Pitta's way on third down and inside the red zone, as Pitta is probably his most trusted pass-catcher. And with Torrey Smith and other Ravens wide receivers struggling to get open against single-high safety looks, defenses have been able to focus on taking away Pitta.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2013
In the not-too-distant future, Navy will meet archrival Army in the latest installment of arguably college football's greatest rivalry at Philadelphia's Lincoln Financial Field on Dec. 14. But before the Midshipmen (6-4) can begin focusing on preparing for their most contentious foe, they still have the matter of a nationally televised game Friday night at San Jose State (5-5). The two sides have met just twice, but the Spartans won both meetings, in 2011 and 2012. And they need just one more victory to become bowl-eligible.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2013
Football coaches love to talk about the importance of all three phases of the game, but special teams often sounds like lip service. When Muhlenberg is involved in the conversation, special teams is a relevant topic. Since 1999, the Mules have scored 25 touchdowns on special teams. In last Saturday's 58-0 demolition of McDaniel, Muhlenberg blocked a 37-yard field-goal attempt and returned it 72 yards for a score and blocked a punt that the offense turned into a touchdown. That aspect of the Mules (2-1 overall and 1-1 in the Centennial Conference)
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2013
Note: The lady mentioned in this post has objected to the use of her name, which I have deleted out of consideration of her wishes.  Let me first assure you that this is not just one more post about literally . It could as well be about singular they , hopefully , irregardless , or any of the other shibboleths peevers brandish, their voices rising an octave or so. It did start out with literally , in an exchange on...
NEWS
June 25, 2013
The major news stories over the weekend were all about the 18 people shot and six killed in black-on-black crime in Baltimore, yet there were no words from the mayor or any other city officials. ("Eight killed in bloody weekend," June 24.) When I hear that "crime in Baltimore is down," I wonder if those in city government are just used to lying to everyone or whether they simply don't care. I also wonder whether the public has gotten so used to the violence that they don't care either.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2013
Duke is less than 24 hours away from tangling with top-seeded Syracuse in Monday's NCAA tournament final. But it is one 60-minute session that concerns the seventh-seeded Blue Devils. Duke (15-5) powered past Cornell, 16-14, in Saturday's semifinal, but the team suffered a lapse in the fourth quarter. The Big Red outscored the Blue Devils, 7-2, in that frame, and Duke needed an empty-net goal by junior attackman Jordan Wolf with 39 seconds left to seal the victory. On Saturday night, the Blue Devils coaching staff reviewed film of that game and when an 11 p.m. meeting with the players came around, the film happened to begin with the fourth quarter and the players and coaches watched with equal amounts of dismay and relief.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Sun Staff Writer | June 13, 1994
Most classes have one -- the student who won't pay attention to the teacher, and who wants everyone else to pay attention to him.Now imagine a whole school of those students, mixed in with troublemakers who have been kicked out of their schools for fighting, vandalism, truancy or even carrying a weapon.Welcome to the Alternative Program of Carroll County public schools, a stopover where students spend anywhere from a few weeks to the rest of the year, until they are ready to try again in their own schools.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko | March 10, 2007
The Orioles signed reliever Scott Williamson to a one-year contract Nov. 30, hoping he could primarily work the middle innings and provide insurance for later because of his experience as a closer. He split last season between the Chicago Cubs and San Diego Padres and underwent another surgery to remove bone chips from his elbow. Williamson was named the National League's Rookie of the Year in 1999 with the Cincinnati Reds after going 12-7 with 19 saves, and made 10 starts the following year.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
When the calendar turns to April and May, the postseason becomes a pressing matter for those teams jockeying for a position in the NCAA tournament. For Stevenson, which is ranked No. 4 in the latest United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association poll, the road to the Division III NCAA tournament appears to be a one-lane thoroughfare as the Mustangs went 8-0 in the Middle Atlantic Conference and is poised to win the league tournament and the accompanying automatic qualifier. But where the team might land in the NCAA tournament is nearly as significant.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2013
No. 12 Washington College's 7-6 come-from-behind win against No. 5 and reigning national champion Salisbury on Wednesday night may prove to be a psychological lift for a program that had dropped 12 straight contests to the Sea Gulls. Perhaps more immediately, the victory might propel to the Shoremen (11-2) to their second consecutive appearance in the NCAA tournament regardless of how they fare in the Centennial Conference tournament. With a 4-2 record in the league, Washington is currently third behind conference leaders Dickinson (12-0 overall and 5-0 in the Centennial)
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