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By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | March 26, 2010
Four global-positioning system devices, an electronic gaming system and hand tools stolen from several cars. Thousands of dollars' worth of jewelry pilfered from precious-metal dealers and linked to a man brokering deals in stolen guns. A $4,500 log splitter dragged out of a fenced-in lot at a Lowe's in Pennsylvania and resold for a few hundred bucks. These are cases investigated by the Westminster Police Department in Carroll County since a new law took effect in October tightening how pawnshops report transactions to police.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | March 26, 2010
Four global-positioning system devices, an electronic gaming system and hand tools stolen from several cars. Thousands of dollars' worth of jewelry pilfered from precious-metal dealers and linked to a man brokering deals in stolen guns. A $4,500 log splitter dragged out of a fenced-in lot at a Lowe's in Pennsylvania and resold for a few hundred bucks. These are cases investigated by the Westminster Police Department in Carroll County since a new law took effect in October tightening how pawnshops report transactions to police.
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NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | January 20, 1995
County Councilman Kevin B. Kamenetz wants to prevent any more pawnshops from opening in Baltimore County until officials can adopt legislation to regulate the business.The 2nd District Democrat introduced a bill Monday night that would freeze the number of pawnshops at the 11 that planning officials and the Police Department have determined now operate in the county."The majority of the pawnshops in the county have opened just in the last year," Mr. Kamenetz said. "I want to make sure we don't have a rush of other shops opening before the regulations are complete."
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun Reporter | June 3, 2008
A pawnshop owner in Glen Burnie was arrested and his business shut down after police found hundreds of thousands of dollars' worth of jewelry hidden in backroom safes, including a $45,000 diamond ring that had been stolen from an 88-year-old Montgomery County woman, police said yesterday. Lee Harold Graham, 59, of the 3400 block of Pinkney Road in Northwest Baltimore has been charged with 15 criminal counts that include failure to keep proper records and reports, theft, possession of stolen property and giving false statements to police officers.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | May 17, 1994
City officials and local pawnbrokers apparently have reached an agreement to toughen the law that regulates Baltimore's pawnshops by increasing penalties for unscrupulous owners and halting the spread of the businesses.The proposal would overhaul Baltimore's pawn law for the first time since 1921, said Sgt. Mike Tabor, who oversees the Police Department's pawn unit and is the driving force behind the change.A hearing on the bill yesterday illustrated the broad agreement among the industry, police and city officials.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | February 7, 1995
The Baltimore County Council voted last night to impose a six-month moratorium on new pawnshops.By a unanimous vote, the seven-member council adopted legislation introduced by Councilman Kevin B. Kamenetz to freeze the number of pawnbrokers in the county at 11 -- the number that police and planning officials have identified as currently in business.The measure now goes to County Executive C. A. Dutch Ruppersberger III for his signature. The Ruppersberger administration did not oppose the legislation.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1994
The ring, engraved "American League Championship, Clemens #21," obviously hadn't been won by the man who brought it to a West Baltimore pawnshop last year.But the pawnbroker bought it anyway, for $300.The next day, a city detective spotted a description of the ring on a list of pawned items and figured it had to be hot. It was -- stolen in 1987 at the Cross Keys Inn along with the briefcase of Boston Red Sox pitcher Roger Clemens.This time, police recovered the stolen property and returned it to its owner.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | September 17, 1994
Baltimore officials took aim at the proliferation of guns on city streets with a new weapon yesterday, using an obscure zoning law to crack down on seven pawnshops illegally selling firearms.One pawnshop was briefly shut down and six others received violation notices, as officials enforced for the first time laws from the 1980s requiring a special permit to sell guns.The seven pawnshops sold more than 400 rifles and shotguns between January 1993 and last month, according to figures compiled by the local office of the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms (ATF)
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | January 9, 1995
Pawnshop owners say they are "bankers to the poor." Critics call pawnshops the "poor man's robber."Baltimore County is responding to community concerns about an increase in pawnshops in recent years by moving ahead with plans to regulate the industry through zoning.A proposal before the Planning Board would require owners of new pawnshops to ask for a special exception to operate in most community business zones and would reassert control that the county lost when the power to license pawnshops was usurped by the state.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | March 12, 1996
Pawnshop owners in Baltimore soon may need the permission of the City Council before setting up shop.The City Council overwhelmingly approved yesterday a bill that restricts the locations of pawnshops, long the bane of neighborhood association members who complain that the shops are crime magnets. Pawnshops now can pop up in any area that is zoned for business.But 5th District Councilwoman Rochelle "Rikki" Spector said that the bill doesn't address the more important issue of helping police prevent the sale of stolen goods to second-hand dealers.
NEWS
By John Fritze and John Fritze,Sun reporter | April 13, 2008
When police look for stolen property in Baltimore - be it a GPS or a pricey diamond necklace - they start with a paper trail that leads them through reams of documents stored in plastic trays and cardboard boxes at police headquarters. It is an antiquated recordkeeping system that every month generates 20,000 paper reports of purchases made by secondhand shops and pawnbrokers. To determine whether a stolen item has been pawned, police go through each record by hand. Now the City Council is considering a proposal that would require Baltimore's 37 pawnshops and 78 secondhand dealers to file reports electronically, creating a database police could search instantly - potentially speeding the recovery of stolen goods.
NEWS
April 8, 2008
Pawnbrokers and owners of second-hand shops would be required to photograph their purchases and submit daily electronic reports of items to police under legislation introduced in the City Council yesterday. The ordinance, drafted by City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake, is intended to give police a tool to more rapidly identify stolen property. Shop owners currently submit the information on paper cards. "We have to get current, and it doesn't make sense that there's a manual card system," Rawlings-Blake said.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | August 26, 2007
As a new law that would create an electronic database to track the stolengoods sold to Carroll County's four pawnshops goes to public hearing Tuesday, two pawnbrokers said the legislation unfairly regulates their businesses while not applying the same scrutiny to more ubiquitous stores that sell used items and antiques. While the businesses that buy and sell used furniture, sporting goods, music CDs and appliances won't be regulated, the bill would require pawnshops to store all items they take in for 15 days after submitting an electronic record of the transaction to police.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun reporter | August 10, 2007
Anne Arundel County police are trying to track down victims of a newly popular form of automobile theft after finding 33 stolen navigational units in local pawnshops. Police have issued a warrant in 10 cases but declined yesterday to identify the suspect because the person has not been arrested. They are seeking additional crime victims who can provide descriptions of their stolen devices, particularly the serial number. Global positioning system units are a growing target for thieves because drivers often leave them perched on dashboards.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,sun reporter | December 29, 2006
When Baltimore and the five surrounding counties decided to start developing an electronic database to track stolen goods brought into pawnshops, Detective Sgt. Chuck Moore of the Westminster State Police barracks asked Carroll County to adopt a related local bill to give the county authority to regulate pawnbrokers. But because Carroll has a board of commissioners, a bill to electronically monitor the county's pawnshops and establish a holding period for purchased items will first have to gain General Assembly approval.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 12, 2004
SEATTLE - A handbell hobbyist in Texas helped crack the case of the stolen church chimes, leading police to three young men suspected of pawning about $20,000 worth of the gleaming bronze bells. Six of eight cases of Schulmerich handbells and Malmark hand chimes stolen from Alderwood Community Church in Lynnwood, Wash., were sold by local pawnshops through eBay to buyers as far away as Pennsylvania for a combined $4,129. A 21-year-old Everett, Wash., man - a former church member - was arrested last week, and police expect to arrest other suspects.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1995
Pawnshops may have a tougher time opening shop in Baltimore neighborhoods because of a proposed City Council bill that aims to restrict their growth and also please some communities that view the shops as a nuisance and crime magnet.Second District Councilman Anthony J. Ambridge and 3rd District Councilman Martin O'Malley introduced in last evening's City Council meeting a bill that would require the council to approve the placement of pawnshops first. Pawnshops can pop up in any area that is zoned for business use."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 12, 2004
SEATTLE - A handbell hobbyist in Texas helped crack the case of the stolen church chimes, leading police to three young men suspected of pawning about $20,000 worth of the gleaming bronze bells. Six of eight cases of Schulmerich handbells and Malmark hand chimes stolen from Alderwood Community Church in Lynnwood, Wash., were sold by local pawnshops through eBay to buyers as far away as Pennsylvania for a combined $4,129. A 21-year-old Everett, Wash., man - a former church member - was arrested last week, and police expect to arrest other suspects.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2003
The glory days of Livingston's, a downtown pawnshop built in 1898, are long gone but remain vividly preserved in a painting owned by the Livingston family's 87-year-old matriarch. The vibrant watercolor in Miriam Livingston's Park Heights condominium was painted in 1946 by Aaron Sopher, a popular regional artist. It portrays the store's location at Baltimore and Gay streets as a corner teeming with pedestrians parading past the burlesque theaters. Foremost among the buildings in the painting is Livingston's.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2000
After more than four months of haggling between city officials and the owners of a pawnshop, the Westminster Common Council voted last night to review its 23-year-old sign standards to prevent similar conflicts. Councilman Gregory Pecoraro suggested the city clarify its rules before making a decision on the pawnshop's window signs and then having "to revisit the issue constantly and frequently for the next few weeks." Diana Gray and Frank Smallwood of Bond Street Loan and Jewelry have been fighting the city's denial of a permit for four signs on the front and side windows of their downtown shop at West Main and Bond streets.
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