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NEWS
December 20, 2005
On December 16, 2005, PAUL S. PAVLOV; beloved husband of Anna Pavlov; devoted father of the late Jenny Pavlov, MD; loving grandfather of Paul and Anna Christina; dear father in-law of Willmar Sick. A funeral service will be held at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26 A), on Wednesday at 1 P.M. Memorial contributions to the Oncology Unit at GBMC Hospital, 6701 N. Charles Street, Towson, MD 21204 will be appreciated.
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NEWS
December 20, 2005
On December 16, 2005, PAUL S. PAVLOV; beloved husband of Anna Pavlov; devoted father of the late Jenny Pavlov, MD; loving grandfather of Paul and Anna Christina; dear father in-law of Willmar Sick. A funeral service will be held at the family owned Ruck Towson Funeral Home, Inc., 1050 York Road (beltway exit 26 A), on Wednesday at 1 P.M. Memorial contributions to the Oncology Unit at GBMC Hospital, 6701 N. Charles Street, Towson, MD 21204 will be appreciated.
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NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | January 15, 1991
MOSCOW -- Valentin S. Pavlov, a 53-year-old economist who has served as Soviet finance minister since 1989, was named yesterday by President Mikhail S. Gorbachev to the trimmed-down job of prime minister of the U.S.S.R.Mr. Pavlov replaces Nikolai S. Ryzhkov, 61, who was considered to be on his way out even before he suffered a serious heart attack on Dec. 25. Mr. Ryzhkov was a close Gorbachev ally who became prime minister in 1985 but had over the past year become an obvious obstacle to further reform.
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2002
Aleksandar Pavlovic calls himself a virtual "runaway" from his home in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, four years ago to study and play basketball one year at Archbishop Spalding High School. "It took me five months to convince my parents to let me come here," said Pavlovic who is now a junior standout at Division II Shippensburg University. "It's safe to say they didn't want me to leave home. Things weren't that good back home when I left." But Pavlovic, 17, had an endless thirst for knowledge, and he would not be satisfied until he was enrolled at Spalding.
NEWS
February 18, 1991
After five years of flirting with democracy and free market, the Kremlin seems to have decided those concepts cannot be transplanted to the Soviet Union in their Western form. Recently, ideologists and planners have become preoccupied with the experiences of China. There, economic successes have been achieved without relaxing the Communist Party's authoritarian controls.It is ludicrous for the Soviets to believe that what works in the Far East would work in their country. Traditions of culture and work ethic are totally different.
SPORTS
July 23, 1991
NOTTINGHAM, England -- They grew up together in the Serbian city of Novi Sad. They play from the baseline and hit two-handed backhands. They're both 17.But nobody who saw Ljudmila Pavlov lose two matches yesterday at the Federation Cup would have mistaken her for Monica Seles, who she replaced on the Yugoslav team at the last moment."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | June 22, 1991
MOSCOW -- After getting an emotional tongue-lashing from President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet parliament dropped a proposal to boost the power of Prime Minister Valentin S. Pavlov at Mr. Gorbachev's expense.By a vote of 262-24, with 21 abstentions, the Supreme Soviet chose not to debate further a request by Mr. Pavlov for additional powers. Though both Mr. Gorbachev and Mr. Pavlov denied they were at odds, the president described the prime minister's request for special powers as "not thought through."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | February 13, 1991
MOSCOW -- Telling a tale more outlandish than the wildest spy fiction, Soviet Prime Minister Valentin S. Pavlov said yesterday that his government had foiled a Western plot to topple the leadership of President Mikhail S. Gorbachev by dumping billions of paper rubles in the country and setting off hyperinflation."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | June 19, 1991
MOSCOW -- Conservatives in the Soviet parliament fiercely attacked President Mikhail S. Gorbachev yesterday for destroying the Soviet Union as a superpower and proposed transferring some of his powers to Prime Minister Valentin S. Pavlov.Liberals countered by charging that Mr. Pavlov, new hero of the hard-liners, was plotting with the military and the KGB to halt reform and restore the old order.After the second closed session of the Supreme Soviet in two days, deputies said, the parliament acceded to a request from Mr. Gorbachev not to grant to Mr. Pavlov for now the expanded powers he requested Monday.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | October 5, 1990
MOSCOW -- Using his new powers for the first time to move toward a market economy, Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev ordered yesterday that wholesale prices for many goods next year be negotiated between buyer and seller rather than set by the state.The presidential decree, unveiled on the evening television news, suggested that Mr. Gorbachev has decided to implement economic change unilaterally without waiting for an indecisive parliament to approve an economic plan."There are certain key issues today on which we as a country and as an economy cannot wait until a program is completely worked out," said Soviet Finance Minister Valentin S. Pavlov, discussing the decree in a televised interview.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 4, 2001
Conspiracy theorists take note: There's something fishy about the hidden war divulged in "Cats and Dogs." For one thing, the advertisements ask, "Who will you root for?" But as an animal-world version of a wrestling smack-down, it's a dog's show, paws down. It gives cat lovers no alternative - unless they're the kind who cheer for the cat-caressing arch-villain Blofeld in the Bond movies. As a movie, it's a robo-dog: even its friskiness is jerkily programmed. In "Cats and Dogs," the feline leader is a hairy white Persian that might well have learned his trade in Blofeld's lap. His name is Mr. Tinkles, and he wants not merely to purge the planet of dogs, but also to enslave humans.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | February 13, 1997
A FEW YEARS ago, the three children who live in our house asked if they could have a dog, which immediately sent me to the refrigerator for a beer."I will walk the dog every day, morning and night, long, brisk walks to keep him peppy and trim," the oldest child said."
NEWS
By PATRICK ERCOLANO | February 21, 1993
Not unlike Pavlov's dog responding to the clang of the dinner bell, I can't help getting a warm feeling whenever I hear the name of a certain Maryland politician.It's all because this pol -- let's call him Senator Pavlov -- gave me a few hundred dollars in state scholarship money each of the four years I attended a private Maryland university.Well, this dog is about to bite the hand that fed him.I have nothing against the good senator. I've never even met the guy. And certainly my parents and I appreciated the scholarship money.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,Moscow Bureau | December 13, 1992
MOSCOW -- In an odd way, the angry and complicate debate consuming the opening days of Russia's Congress last week could be understood most clearly by considering the humble kiosks crowding Moscow's sidewalks.Russians look at the kiosks, which sell everything from liquor and fur coats to shampoo and underwear, and see either certain economic ruin or guaranteed salvation.The bustling kiosks, where prices are set by the seller and not the state, are an inescapable reminder that Russia has turned its back on a command economy and is trying mightily to adapt to a free market.
SPORTS
July 23, 1991
NOTTINGHAM, England -- They grew up together in the Serbian city of Novi Sad. They play from the baseline and hit two-handed backhands. They're both 17.But nobody who saw Ljudmila Pavlov lose two matches yesterday at the Federation Cup would have mistaken her for Monica Seles, who she replaced on the Yugoslav team at the last moment."
NEWS
June 23, 1991
The struggle for power now going in the Soviet Union is inexorably pushing two rivals -- Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev and Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin -- into an awkward alliance against the forces of reaction led by Soviet Premier Valentin Pavlov. During the past week, as Mr. Yeltsin visited Washington and Mr. Gorbachev fought off an open challenge from Mr. Pavlov, their common cause became more important than their personal antagonism and conflicting ambitions.Mr. Yeltsin, though feted as the first popularly elected leader in Russian history, was rather bluntly advised by President Bush that the U.S. was standing by Mr. Gorbachev and he would be wise to do the same.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | June 22, 1991
MOSCOW -- After getting an emotional tongue-lashing from President Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet parliament dropped a proposal to boost the power of Prime Minister Valentin S. Pavlov at Mr. Gorbachev's expense.By a vote of 262-24, with 21 abstentions, the Supreme Soviet chose not to debate further a request by Mr. Pavlov for additional powers. Though both Mr. Gorbachev and Mr. Pavlov denied they were at odds, the president described the prime minister's request for special powers as "not thought through."
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