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By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff RlB | May 22, 1991
This is the Year of Mozart, the 200th anniversary of his death. More by accident, it's also the year of "The Masked Ball," Verdi's aria-packed opera staged by about every company in sight, including the Met and the Baltimore Opera.Tonight at 8 p.m. on MPT's channels 22 and 67, the Met's 2 1/2 -hour version taped Jan. 26 brings a solid performance of the 1859 opera romanticizing events leading to the assassination of the popular Swedish King Gustav III at a 1792 court ball.James Levine conducts and F. Murray Abraham is the host.
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By GARRISON KEILLOR | September 13, 2007
I saw Luciano Pavarotti sing Pagliacci at Carnegie Hall 15 years ago, and it was pretty good. The great man was a good hundred pounds over his fighting weight and he perspired heavily, but when it came time for him to stand and deliver "Vesti la giubba," he did it big, a cry from the heart with a sob in the voice that a tenor from, say, Minnesota or Iowa would find it hard to match, and the audience cried out in admiration, as it should, and stood and...
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By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 2, 2002
Fells Point now has its own Italian restaurant - its only Italian restaurant, according to owner David Dodson. Dodson opened the doors of Pavarotti two weeks ago in the space formerly occupied by the Greek eatery Karabelas. The restaurant specializes in Northern Italian cuisine, cooked up by executive chef - and Dodson's mother-in-law-to-be - Marisa Fraschini, who moved here from Bologna, Italy. As for the name, Dodson says he was going for "something Italian, easy to say, easy to remember."
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | September 9, 2007
Luciano Pavarotti was laid to rest yesterday, and, with his passing, an incredible chapter in operatic history came to a close. Bono, frontman of the rock group U2 and one of the many pop stars who collaborated with the charismatic tenor in large-scale concerts, said it well last week: "Some can sing opera - Luciano Pavarotti was an opera." Larger-than-life describes the man, physically and musically. A godsend to gossip columnists and TV chat show hosts, not just music journalists, he had everything needed for celebrity status - and quite a bit more.
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By SYLVIA BADGER | July 8, 1992
When opera star Luciano Pavarotti came to Baltimore in 1986 for a Baltimore Opera Company benefit, Larry and Lorraine Denmark prepared a banquet for him after his performance, complete with one of his favorite beverages, Dom Perignon rose.At the time Lorraine was pregnant. Pavarotti asked if she would sit on his lap and he patted her stomach, saying it was an "old custom" and perhaps the child would sing. Three years later, Pavarotti performed at the Baltimore Arena and the Denmarks fixed lunch and dinner for him. When they asked him to autograph their child's picture, he responded, "Well, does she sing?"
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By SYLVIA BADGER | December 17, 1995
IN EARLY DECEMBER, Luciano Pavarotti was onstage at the USAir Arena, where he gave a rousing performance to benefit the Autism Society. All the action was not onstage, but backstage, where Pavarotti and his entourage partook of a feast provided by Baltimore's Larry and Lorraine Denmark and Henry & Jeff's owners, Henry Pertman and Jeff Pressman.This was the fourth time in 10 years that the Denmarks, whose food credentials include Lorraine's, Puffins and BOP Pizza, have supplied some of the food for the singer.
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By GARRISON KEILLOR | September 13, 2007
I saw Luciano Pavarotti sing Pagliacci at Carnegie Hall 15 years ago, and it was pretty good. The great man was a good hundred pounds over his fighting weight and he perspired heavily, but when it came time for him to stand and deliver "Vesti la giubba," he did it big, a cry from the heart with a sob in the voice that a tenor from, say, Minnesota or Iowa would find it hard to match, and the audience cried out in admiration, as it should, and stood and...
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By McClatchy News Service | November 13, 1994
Although opera's popularity has been growing by leaps and bounds in recent years, some people still remain a bit reluctant to embrace it.They may have heard "Che fai? . . . nulla" (from "La Traviata") in the movie "Pretty Woman" or "La mamma morta" (from "Andrea Chenier") in "Philadelphia" -- Hollywood makes use of opera frequently nowadays -- and decided it should have a place in their lives. They'd like to buy a few recordings but have no idea where to start.Now, as a result of the teaming of London Records and Luciano Pavarotti on a project called "Pavarotti's Opera Made Easy," there is a place.
NEWS
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN REPORTER | July 8, 2006
Luciano Pavarotti, the Italian tenor who has enjoyed enormous popularity worldwide for more then three decades, underwent surgery for pancreatic cancer within the past week and has canceled all remaining 2006 concerts. In a statement yesterday to the Associated Press, Pavarotti's manager, Terri Robson, described the 70-year-old singer as "recovering well" at a New York hospital that she declined to identify. "A malignant pancreatic mass" was removed during surgery, Robson said, adding that "Pavarotti remains under the care of a team of doctors in New York and will undergo a course of treatment over the coming months.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | June 2, 2002
Ten years from now, the area where Pavarotti is located may be the trendiest neighborhood in Baltimore. Not now. Just west of Little Italy and just north of Fells Point proper, it's still down at the heels -- although there are signs that it's starting to be gentrified. I fear such good fortune won't come soon enough for the area's newest Italian restaurant, as it didn't for its predecessor, Karabelas, a handsome Greek restaurant that never seemed to have any customers and closed after less than two years.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | September 8, 2007
In Luciano Pavarotti's foreword to Ponselle: A Singer's Life, published by Doubleday in 1982, he wrote that when he was growing up in Modena, Italy, he could "hardly remember a time when the name Rosa Ponselle was unfamiliar to me." Pavarotti, who died this week, wrote that her recordings "assured her of immortality," and as a young boy alto, he was urged to "listen to them, note by note, one after the other." In the early 1970s, Pavarotti and the great Metropolitan Opera Company diva began a telephone-and-letter friendship that culminated in 1977 when the operatic tenor visited Villa Pace, her Green Spring Valley home.
NEWS
September 7, 2007
He had neither the grace nor the repertoire of his rivals, but Luciano Pavarotti had that voice - a distinctive, sonorous sound that could enchant and seduce - and he had a showman's personality that popularized opera beyond the great houses and stages where he sang. That may be his most endearing gift, both to the classical art to which he came late and to the world of popular culture he so robustly embraced. Mr. Pavarotti, 71, who died this week after a year's battle with pancreatic cancer, was an Italian tenor whose performance in a French opera earned him the moniker the "King of the High C's" (one signature aria had nine of them)
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun music critic | September 6, 2007
Luciano Pavarotti, who possessed one of the most radiant tenor voices to be heard in the past hundred years and who enjoyed a level of popularity unequaled since the legendary Enrico Caruso, died early today in his hometown of Modena, Italy. He was 71. Mr. Pavarotti was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer last year and underwent surgery in July 2006. Last month, he was admitted to a Modena hospital, reportedly with a fever. After about three weeks of tests and treatment, the singer returned to his home, where he was cared for by local doctors, according to Italian news reports.
FEATURES
August 15, 2007
Oscar winner Anjelica Huston will drop by NBC's Medium next season. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Huston will appear in six episodes of the Emmy-winning drama, which will return for its fourth season in January. The trade paper says that Huston will play a character named Cynthia Keener, an investigator who enters into an unusual partnership with Patricia Arquette's Allison Dubois. Are we ready for this? A Los Angeles court commissioner said yesterday that he would consider a motion by a magazine and a TV station to unseal documents in the Britney Spears-Kevin Federline divorce case.
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By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN REPORTER | July 8, 2006
Luciano Pavarotti, the Italian tenor who has enjoyed enormous popularity worldwide for more then three decades, underwent surgery for pancreatic cancer within the past week and has canceled all remaining 2006 concerts. In a statement yesterday to the Associated Press, Pavarotti's manager, Terri Robson, described the 70-year-old singer as "recovering well" at a New York hospital that she declined to identify. "A malignant pancreatic mass" was removed during surgery, Robson said, adding that "Pavarotti remains under the care of a team of doctors in New York and will undergo a course of treatment over the coming months.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 3, 2004
When I called the box office at the Metropolitan Opera to buy a seat for a particular performance of Der Rosenkavalier in 1990, the ticket agent responded, "I must point out to you that Luciano Pavarotti will not be in the cast that day." Back then, when he still had lots of voice and ease of mobility, Pavarotti would occasionally don a costume for this Richard Strauss opera and send audiences into a tizzy singing the brief, soaring aria in the one-scene role of the Italian Singer. I hope I didn't sound too condescending when I replied, "I couldn't care less about Pavarotti.
NEWS
June 29, 1993
After what was by all accounts a phenomenal performance Saturday before a crowd of 500,000 in New York's Central Park, opera superstar Luciano Pavarotti is entitled to borrow Mark Twain's legendary retort to the press: "Reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated."The Italian tenor hadn't been pronounced dead, exactly, but much of the reportage concerning him recently has strongly implied his stage career is nearing its end. For an opera singer, that's akin to having one foot in the grave.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 3, 2004
When I called the box office at the Metropolitan Opera to buy a seat for a particular performance of Der Rosenkavalier in 1990, the ticket agent responded, "I must point out to you that Luciano Pavarotti will not be in the cast that day." Back then, when he still had lots of voice and ease of mobility, Pavarotti would occasionally don a costume for this Richard Strauss opera and send audiences into a tizzy singing the brief, soaring aria in the one-scene role of the Italian Singer. I hope I didn't sound too condescending when I replied, "I couldn't care less about Pavarotti.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 30, 2002
When an ailing Luciano Pavarotti failed to deliver what was widely assumed to be his swan song at the Metropolitan Opera on May 11, the unmistakable sound of an era ending could be heard. It didn't matter that Pavarotti would sing again, somewhere. (He just announced he'll retire in 2005 upon turning 70.) So much was - perhaps unjustifiably - riding on that gala Met performance that his no-show sparked a lot of carrying on about his vocal obsolescence. Maybe the real message of that whole, sorry incident is that it's time for the next generation of opera stars to take center stage.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | June 2, 2002
Ten years from now, the area where Pavarotti is located may be the trendiest neighborhood in Baltimore. Not now. Just west of Little Italy and just north of Fells Point proper, it's still down at the heels -- although there are signs that it's starting to be gentrified. I fear such good fortune won't come soon enough for the area's newest Italian restaurant, as it didn't for its predecessor, Karabelas, a handsome Greek restaurant that never seemed to have any customers and closed after less than two years.
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