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By ANN HORNADAY | June 21, 1998
Pauline Kael, the legendary movie critic, retired from the New Yorker in 1991. This week she is interviewed in a special edition of Newsweek. Kael levels her gaze at some recent pictures and some current stars, deploying her characteristically trenchant prose:On Jim Carrey: "An inspired rough-and-tumble comedian." On Anne Heche: "She has a lovely, fragile Pierrette quality, and she's a fearless actress. But she's got an obstacle in her career. Because, realistically, it may be difficult for some people to accept certain kinds of knowledge about a performer's off-screen life."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 21, 2004
Carl Theodor Dreyer's The Passion of Joan of Arc is, simply stated, one of the most striking, passionate and vivid films ever made, a study in the use of close-ups and in the filming of naked emotion that has lost none of its impact over the eight decades since its release. Seeing this amazing film in any incarnation is extraordinary enough, but Baltimore cinephiles should consider themselves blessed this weekend. Sunday at the Meyerhoff, Dreyer's stark masterpiece will be shown in a print that is reportedly as close as we can get nowadays to what the director originally had in mind (the original negative was destroyed in a fire, causing Dreyer to reconstruct the film using alternate takes; that version - which will be shown Sunday - was denounced by both the French and British, and subsequently altered)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 4, 2001
Pauline Kael, the former movie critic for The New Yorker, died of natural causes yesterday at her home in Great Barrington, Mass. She was 82. Her first published piece of criticism was an attack on Charles Chaplin's Limelight that appeared in the small San Francisco magazine, City Lights, in 1953. For nearly four decades, she convinced several generations of moviegoers that movies were, as she put it, "our national theater." The power of her arguments and the colloquial wit and panache of her prose revolutionized movie reviewing, New Yorker writing and American criticism in general.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 9, 2001
Whether she was calling Nashville "the funniest epic vision of America ever to reach the screen" or the 1978 Invasion of the Body Snatchers "the best movie of its kind ever made," Pauline Kael always meant exactly what she said. When I think of her critical vocabulary, I recall slang she used so distinctively that she might as well have patented it -- like "zizzy." Or words she used in combina-tions that were uniquely hers, like "rotten-rich." She was too wary of theory and repetition to rely on critical catchphrases or inject her words with inflated meaning.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 9, 2001
Whether she was calling Nashville "the funniest epic vision of America ever to reach the screen" or the 1978 Invasion of the Body Snatchers "the best movie of its kind ever made," Pauline Kael always meant exactly what she said. When I think of her critical vocabulary, I recall slang she used so distinctively that she might as well have patented it -- like "zizzy." Or words she used in combina-tions that were uniquely hers, like "rotten-rich." She was too wary of theory and repetition to rely on critical catchphrases or inject her words with inflated meaning.
FEATURES
By Scott Eyman and Scott Eyman,Cox News Service | January 4, 1993
Gary Giddins is more than good, but not great, not yet."Faces in the Crowd" is a collection of Mr. Giddins' critical articles, mostly from the Village Voice, where he's been ensconced for years.He's stronger on writing and music -- he may be the best jazz critic in the country -- than he is on film; his report on Clint Eastwood's "Bird" is ingenuously condescending, as if he had to pinch himself that Dirty Harry had the brains, not just to appreciate Charlie Parker, but to make a film of integrity about him. Like, wow!
NEWS
June 8, 1998
Retired Lt. Col. Jay R. Jensen,66, a prisoner of war who was released in 1973, six years after being shot down over Vietnam, died of a heart attack May 29 in Salt Lake City. He was also a high priest in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.Angel South,55, lead guitarist with the early '70s band Chase, who later wrote novelty songs such as "The Job That Ate My Brain" and "I Got a Receipt for Playing the Blues," died in Placerville, Calif., on Thursday of prostate cancer. Born Lucien Gondron in Port Arthur, Texas, he grew up playing in bands with Janis Joplin, Johnny and Edgar Winter and B. J. Thomas.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 21, 2004
Carl Theodor Dreyer's The Passion of Joan of Arc is, simply stated, one of the most striking, passionate and vivid films ever made, a study in the use of close-ups and in the filming of naked emotion that has lost none of its impact over the eight decades since its release. Seeing this amazing film in any incarnation is extraordinary enough, but Baltimore cinephiles should consider themselves blessed this weekend. Sunday at the Meyerhoff, Dreyer's stark masterpiece will be shown in a print that is reportedly as close as we can get nowadays to what the director originally had in mind (the original negative was destroyed in a fire, causing Dreyer to reconstruct the film using alternate takes; that version - which will be shown Sunday - was denounced by both the French and British, and subsequently altered)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 21, 2001
Stanley Kramer proudly wore his heart on his sleeve - and displayed it in his movies. There's "The Defiant Ones," with Sidney Poitier and Tony Curtis as escaped convicts who must overcome their racial prejudices to survive. And "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner," the story of an affluent, liberal-minded white couple who finds they're about to gain a black man for a son-in-law. "Judgment at Nuremberg" is an examination of the Nazi war trials. And "Inherit the Wind" is an account of the famed Scopes trial, in which freedom of thought was as much on trial as the theory of evolution.
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By Michael Sragow | January 8, 2002
NEW YORK - If the nation's film critics prevail, Mulholland Drive will nab the Oscar in April for best picture. During a meeting Saturday, David Lynch's erotic thriller edged out Robert Altman's murder mystery/comedy of manners, Gosford Park, as the top film of the year, by 30 votes to 28. The Tolkien epic Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring was a distant third, with 19 votes. The meeting was dedicated to the memory of Pauline Kael, longtime critic for The New Yorker and a founder of the National Society of Film Critics.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 4, 2001
Pauline Kael, the former movie critic for The New Yorker, died of natural causes yesterday at her home in Great Barrington, Mass. She was 82. Her first published piece of criticism was an attack on Charles Chaplin's Limelight that appeared in the small San Francisco magazine, City Lights, in 1953. For nearly four decades, she convinced several generations of moviegoers that movies were, as she put it, "our national theater." The power of her arguments and the colloquial wit and panache of her prose revolutionized movie reviewing, New Yorker writing and American criticism in general.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 21, 2001
Stanley Kramer proudly wore his heart on his sleeve - and displayed it in his movies. There's "The Defiant Ones," with Sidney Poitier and Tony Curtis as escaped convicts who must overcome their racial prejudices to survive. And "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner," the story of an affluent, liberal-minded white couple who finds they're about to gain a black man for a son-in-law. "Judgment at Nuremberg" is an examination of the Nazi war trials. And "Inherit the Wind" is an account of the famed Scopes trial, in which freedom of thought was as much on trial as the theory of evolution.
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY | June 21, 1998
Pauline Kael, the legendary movie critic, retired from the New Yorker in 1991. This week she is interviewed in a special edition of Newsweek. Kael levels her gaze at some recent pictures and some current stars, deploying her characteristically trenchant prose:On Jim Carrey: "An inspired rough-and-tumble comedian." On Anne Heche: "She has a lovely, fragile Pierrette quality, and she's a fearless actress. But she's got an obstacle in her career. Because, realistically, it may be difficult for some people to accept certain kinds of knowledge about a performer's off-screen life."
NEWS
June 8, 1998
Retired Lt. Col. Jay R. Jensen,66, a prisoner of war who was released in 1973, six years after being shot down over Vietnam, died of a heart attack May 29 in Salt Lake City. He was also a high priest in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.Angel South,55, lead guitarist with the early '70s band Chase, who later wrote novelty songs such as "The Job That Ate My Brain" and "I Got a Receipt for Playing the Blues," died in Placerville, Calif., on Thursday of prostate cancer. Born Lucien Gondron in Port Arthur, Texas, he grew up playing in bands with Janis Joplin, Johnny and Edgar Winter and B. J. Thomas.
FEATURES
By Scott Eyman and Scott Eyman,Cox News Service | January 4, 1993
Gary Giddins is more than good, but not great, not yet."Faces in the Crowd" is a collection of Mr. Giddins' critical articles, mostly from the Village Voice, where he's been ensconced for years.He's stronger on writing and music -- he may be the best jazz critic in the country -- than he is on film; his report on Clint Eastwood's "Bird" is ingenuously condescending, as if he had to pinch himself that Dirty Harry had the brains, not just to appreciate Charlie Parker, but to make a film of integrity about him. Like, wow!
NEWS
By [MICHAEL SRAGOW] | May 18, 2008
CATE BLANCHETT appears as Irina Spalko, the first all-out female villain in the series, in Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008). If she works, she'll heat up the Cold War in a dry-ice way as the driven, greedy chief of an elite Soviet military unit jousting with Indy and his new sidekick, Mutt (Shia LaBeouf). ALISON DOODY as Dr. Elsa Schneider, a gorgeous Austrian art historian and sadly halfhearted femme fatale in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade (1989). Doody is a blond dazzler, but she's wasted until the end, when, as Pauline Kael said, "She goes out in glory, with glittering eyes and a lewd smile."
NEWS
By Zev Chafets | August 6, 2004
IN 1972, The New Yorker's movie critic, Pauline Kael, won herself a place in political lore by expressing astonishment at the Republicans' 49-state landslide victory. "How could that be?" she demanded. "I don't know a single person who voted for Nixon." I don't live in such a rarified world, but most of my friends are voting for John Kerry. And I imagine that a good many will be shocked when President Bush wins in November. It is possible that no Democrat could beat Mr. Bush this year.
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