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Paula Vogel

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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 29, 1992
In her notes to the published script of "The Baltimore Waltz," playwright Paula Vogel writes: "In 1986, my brother Carl invited me to join him in a joint excursion to Europe. Due to pressures of time and money, I declined, never dreaming that he was HIV-positive."In 1988, Carl Vogel died of AIDS. His sister has described him as the person she loved the most. She was also one of his principal caretakers during his illness and treatment, which included participation in an early experimental program with the drug AZT at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
Frank J. "Gus" Vogel, an official of the Maryland Transportation Authority Police, died of cancer Wednesday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Chase resident was 60. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Frank John Vogel and Margaret Vogel. He was a graduate of Parkville High School, where he played baseball and football. He earned an associate's degree at Essex Community College. Mr. Vogel was a statistician for an insurance business before joining the Maryland Transportation Authority Police in 1993.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Lipson and Karin Lipson,NEWSDAY | November 30, 2003
Paula Vogel had begun working on a new play - one that that would make use of puppets, as well as people - when the movie Being John Malkovich, about a frustrated puppeteer, was released in 1999. "Oh, no," she remembers thinking, "people will think I stole the puppet idea." It was no movie, of course, that led Vogel to intermingle puppets and actors in The Long Christmas Ride Home, which runs through Dec. 7 at Off-Broadway's Vineyard Theatre. (Nor was it, for that matter, an inkling of Avenue Q, the puppets-and-humans musical, now on Broadway, that premiered at the Vineyard.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
We have never really stopped fighting the Civil War. Probably never will. But, once in a while, maybe we can all agree that the things that once split the nation apart should not keep us apart now, that there are still things that ought to bind us together. The winter holidays seem a particularly apt time for such reflection, a time when we tend to take stock, gather around families and friends, count blessings, put hope in the next year. All of which is to say that the Baltimore premiere of Paula Vogel's "A Civil War Christmas" in a soaring production at Center Stage couldn't be more welcome or relevant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | May 16, 1999
Playwright Paula Vogel and director Molly Smith have been friends and colleagues for so long that at times they seem to share the same thoughts. When they show up for an interview in Smith's office, they take one look at each other and laugh as they realize they are both wearing bolo ties. (Smith immediately removes hers.)A native of the Pacific Northwest, Smith is completing her first season as artistic director of Washington's Arena Stage. Vogel, a former Marylander, won the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for her play "How I Learned to Drive," the current production at Arena's Kreeger Theater, under Smith's direction.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 3, 1998
NEW YORK -- It's been a time of champagne and flowers for 1998 Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Paula Vogel. But there have also been tears.Walking outside the Century Theatre the day after her award-winning play, "How I Learned to Drive," ended its 15-month off-Broadway run, Vogel can't bear to look at the Dumpster filling up with pieces of the demolished set.Vogel attended the final performance and thought she'd be fine. "I was talking to friends and saying, 'You know, I'm at peace with this.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 31, 1998
This year's 1998 Pulitzer Prize-winning play, Paula Vogel's "How I Learned to Drive," wasn't eligible for a Tony Award because it wasn't produced on Broadway. But Baltimoreans have one week left to catch the play's Maryland premiere at Center Stage.In this boldly singular drama, driving lessons serve as a metaphor for the inappropriate relationship that develops between a young girl and her uncle-by-marriage. But instead of labeling these characters good and evil, Vogel treats them both with respect.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
Frank J. "Gus" Vogel, an official of the Maryland Transportation Authority Police, died of cancer Wednesday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Chase resident was 60. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Frank John Vogel and Margaret Vogel. He was a graduate of Parkville High School, where he played baseball and football. He earned an associate's degree at Essex Community College. Mr. Vogel was a statistician for an insurance business before joining the Maryland Transportation Authority Police in 1993.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 22, 2000
Understanding the past is the chief issue explored in the final production of AXIS Theatre's season, Richard Greenberg's "Three Days of Rain." Despite its thought-provoking theme, the play is ultimately more clever than insightful. The reading of a famous architect's will brings together his grown son, Walker (Randolph Hadaway), daughter, Nan (Donna Sherman) and business partner's son, Pip (Larry Malkus). Walker, who has suddenly surfaced after an unexplained year-long disappearance, discovers his late father's cryptic journal and, by the end of the first act, is certain he has unearthed a crucial truth about his taciturn dad. In Act 2, the three actors portray their parents 35 years earlier, and we see the reality that the next generation has blindly -- and as it turns out, erroneously -- guessed at. "Three Days of Rain" presents an intriguing acting challenge, which AXIS' cast handles with fluid grace under Brian Klaas' direction.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 29, 2000
The concept behind the film was one of the more intriguing of the television season: Three gay playwrights explore homosexuality in three different decades in the same small town. The result, "Common Ground," which premieres at 8 tonight on the Showtime cable channel, delivers on the promise with a touching and uncommonly wise film about gay identity and some of the dominant culture's most cherished values. The trio of playwrights gathered for this project was remarkable: Tony Award winners Terrence McNally ("Kiss of the Spiderwoman" and "Ragtime")
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2013
The performing arts scene is revved up for another holiday season. In addition to the usual flurry of such perennial favorites as Handel's "Messiah" and Tchaikovsky's "The Nutcracker," this year's lineup gains fresh spice from several new-to-Baltimore productions, including a play about the last Christmas of the Civil War and stage adaptations of popular holiday movies. Here's a look at some of these novel attractions. 'A Civil War Christmas' In 1997, just before the premiere of "How I Learned to Drive," the powerful play about child abuse that would earn her a Pulitzer Prize, Paula Vogel got the inspiration for a very different work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2011
A family of five sets off on a snowy day in a Rambler with snow chains on the tires. While the kids in the back seat deal with petty concerns and car sickness, the parents reflect on the directions their lives are taking inside and outside of their marriage. All is far from calm and bright on "The Long Christmas Ride Home," Paula Vogel's remarkable play, which has been given a penetrating production from Single Carrot Theatre . No one in the car — the ride is vividly evoked in the simplest of means — has to ask, "Are we there yet?"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Lipson and Karin Lipson,NEWSDAY | November 30, 2003
Paula Vogel had begun working on a new play - one that that would make use of puppets, as well as people - when the movie Being John Malkovich, about a frustrated puppeteer, was released in 1999. "Oh, no," she remembers thinking, "people will think I stole the puppet idea." It was no movie, of course, that led Vogel to intermingle puppets and actors in The Long Christmas Ride Home, which runs through Dec. 7 at Off-Broadway's Vineyard Theatre. (Nor was it, for that matter, an inkling of Avenue Q, the puppets-and-humans musical, now on Broadway, that premiered at the Vineyard.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 22, 2000
Understanding the past is the chief issue explored in the final production of AXIS Theatre's season, Richard Greenberg's "Three Days of Rain." Despite its thought-provoking theme, the play is ultimately more clever than insightful. The reading of a famous architect's will brings together his grown son, Walker (Randolph Hadaway), daughter, Nan (Donna Sherman) and business partner's son, Pip (Larry Malkus). Walker, who has suddenly surfaced after an unexplained year-long disappearance, discovers his late father's cryptic journal and, by the end of the first act, is certain he has unearthed a crucial truth about his taciturn dad. In Act 2, the three actors portray their parents 35 years earlier, and we see the reality that the next generation has blindly -- and as it turns out, erroneously -- guessed at. "Three Days of Rain" presents an intriguing acting challenge, which AXIS' cast handles with fluid grace under Brian Klaas' direction.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 29, 2000
The concept behind the film was one of the more intriguing of the television season: Three gay playwrights explore homosexuality in three different decades in the same small town. The result, "Common Ground," which premieres at 8 tonight on the Showtime cable channel, delivers on the promise with a touching and uncommonly wise film about gay identity and some of the dominant culture's most cherished values. The trio of playwrights gathered for this project was remarkable: Tony Award winners Terrence McNally ("Kiss of the Spiderwoman" and "Ragtime")
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,sun theater critic | May 16, 1999
Playwright Paula Vogel and director Molly Smith have been friends and colleagues for so long that at times they seem to share the same thoughts. When they show up for an interview in Smith's office, they take one look at each other and laugh as they realize they are both wearing bolo ties. (Smith immediately removes hers.)A native of the Pacific Northwest, Smith is completing her first season as artistic director of Washington's Arena Stage. Vogel, a former Marylander, won the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for her play "How I Learned to Drive," the current production at Arena's Kreeger Theater, under Smith's direction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
We have never really stopped fighting the Civil War. Probably never will. But, once in a while, maybe we can all agree that the things that once split the nation apart should not keep us apart now, that there are still things that ought to bind us together. The winter holidays seem a particularly apt time for such reflection, a time when we tend to take stock, gather around families and friends, count blessings, put hope in the next year. All of which is to say that the Baltimore premiere of Paula Vogel's "A Civil War Christmas" in a soaring production at Center Stage couldn't be more welcome or relevant.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2013
The performing arts scene is revved up for another holiday season. In addition to the usual flurry of such perennial favorites as Handel's "Messiah" and Tchaikovsky's "The Nutcracker," this year's lineup gains fresh spice from several new-to-Baltimore productions, including a play about the last Christmas of the Civil War and stage adaptations of popular holiday movies. Here's a look at some of these novel attractions. 'A Civil War Christmas' In 1997, just before the premiere of "How I Learned to Drive," the powerful play about child abuse that would earn her a Pulitzer Prize, Paula Vogel got the inspiration for a very different work.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 31, 1998
This year's 1998 Pulitzer Prize-winning play, Paula Vogel's "How I Learned to Drive," wasn't eligible for a Tony Award because it wasn't produced on Broadway. But Baltimoreans have one week left to catch the play's Maryland premiere at Center Stage.In this boldly singular drama, driving lessons serve as a metaphor for the inappropriate relationship that develops between a young girl and her uncle-by-marriage. But instead of labeling these characters good and evil, Vogel treats them both with respect.
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