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Paula Corbin Jones

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NEWS
January 24, 1998
A caption in the Today section yesterday misstated the nature of Paula Corbin Jones' allegation against President Clinton. Jones has accused the president of sexual harassment.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 1/24/98
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Kenneth W. Starr, who spent five years investigating criminal allegations against President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton, said yesterday that the president "has yet to come to terms with his own responsibility" in trying to "play games with the law."In a breakfast meeting with reporters, Starr also said the notion he had been too zealous in pursuing the Clintons is "a totally bogus and bum rap."Since his resignation in October as independent counsel for Whitewater matters, Starr has been engaged in a round of carefully selected public appearances as part of a concerted effort to give his side of the epic battle with the Clintons.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 26, 1996
The First Lady experimented with spiritualism but did not inhale.Paula Corbin Jones will have to wait. Affairs of state come first.The Orioles are wasting alarms about a potential market competitor 50 miles away when they should be worried about the pitching rotation and Yankee power.More Parks Sausages, Franco!Pub Date: 6/26/96
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 27, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Kathleen Willey, a one-time White House volunteer who has said she was groped in the Oval Office by President Clinton, may have once tried to help Paula Corbin Jones succeed in her sexual misconduct lawsuit against the president.The statement by Joseph Cammarata, a former lawyer for Jones, was contained in previously sealed documents from Jones' lawsuit that were released yesterday in Little Rock.In an affidavit, Cammarata said he received a telephone call in January 1997 from a woman who did not give her name but who said she had had an experience with Clinton similar to Jones'.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 9, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Law professor Anita Faye Hill, whose accusations against Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas put the sexual harassment issue at the national forefront, said yesterday that she saw both similarities and differences between her case and that of Paula Corbin Jones, who has filed a federal lawsuit alleging that President Clinton committed the same offense.Because both cases involve allegations against highly visible and powerful figures, "there will be some comparisons," Ms. Hill said in an interview on CBS' "Face the Nation."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 27, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Kathleen Willey, a one-time White House volunteer who has said she was groped in the Oval Office by President Clinton, may have once tried to help Paula Corbin Jones succeed in her sexual misconduct lawsuit against the president.The statement by Joseph Cammarata, a former lawyer for Jones, was contained in previously sealed documents from Jones' lawsuit that were released yesterday in Little Rock.In an affidavit, Cammarata said he received a telephone call in January 1997 from a woman who did not give her name but who said she had had an experience with Clinton similar to Jones'.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | June 16, 1994
Paula Corbin Jones, the former Arkansas state employee who last month filed a sexual harassment suit against President Clinton, begins a national media tour tonight by talking to Sam Donaldson on ABC's "PrimeTime Live."Ms. Jones charges that Mr. Clinton, while governor of Arkansas in 1991, tried to seduce her in a Little Rock hotel room. The White House has said the charges are false and declined to comment further to "PrimeTime," Mr. Donaldson said.In excerpts provided by ABC, Ms. Jones indicated that her lawsuit could be settled "if he was to make a public apology and it be what I want.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | January 13, 1998
WASHINGTON -- A lawyer for Paula Corbin Jones said yesterday that settlement efforts had collapsed in her sexual harassment lawsuit against President Clinton, setting the stage for the two to meet in a historic deposition, tentatively set for Saturday.David Pyke, one of the team of Dallas attorneys representing Jones, confirmed that his side had made an offer a month ago seeking $2 million plus a statement from Clinton that was essentially an apology.But the president's attorneys rebuffed it, Pyke said, blaming them for leaking the offer to the press.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Kenneth W. Starr, who spent five years investigating criminal allegations against President Clinton and Hillary Rodham Clinton, said yesterday that the president "has yet to come to terms with his own responsibility" in trying to "play games with the law."In a breakfast meeting with reporters, Starr also said the notion he had been too zealous in pursuing the Clintons is "a totally bogus and bum rap."Since his resignation in October as independent counsel for Whitewater matters, Starr has been engaged in a round of carefully selected public appearances as part of a concerted effort to give his side of the epic battle with the Clintons.
NEWS
By Steven Lubet | February 4, 1998
PRESIDENT Clinton's attorneys recently asked the judge in the Paula Corbin Jones case to move up the trial date, arguing that the case needed the controlled setting of a courtroom, away from "gossip, innuendo and hearsay being passed off as fact."But their aggressive tactics are the last thing the president needs. Instead, the better tactic would be to walk away from the matter tomorrow, by taking immediate steps to get the sordid lawsuit off the front page.How to do this? The president would simply tell his attorneys to stop defending the case.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 4, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Paula Corbin Jones' sexual-misconduct lawsuit, a sideline diversion for President Clinton as his other legal woes deepened in recent months, may be about to take on a new and trouble-causing life at center stage.Instead of receding further into the background while an appeal by Jones goes forward quietly, her case could soon produce a constitutional battle as important as the one that took the case to the Supreme Court once before. Looming is a threat, which some lawyers say is not an idle one, that the president could be cited by a judge for contempt of court and face potentially serious sanctions.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 23, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court indicated yesterday that it wants to simplify sexual harassment law -- but probably not in a way that would help Paula Corbin Jones in her lawsuit against President Clinton.The justices struggled through a hearing yesterday, often displaying uncertainty about the meaning of the federal ban on sexual harassment in the workplace, especially in the wake of lower-court rulings that have reached differing and confusing results.11 judges, 8 opinionsIn the Illinois case the justices heard, 11 federal appellate judges issued eight separate opinions, conceding that they could not assemble a majority to support a common basis for the ruling -- though the outcome of their decision favored the worker.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Susan Baer and Lyle Denniston and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 17, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Saying she wants to fight on and expects to win "my day in court," Paula Corbin Jones said yesterday that she will appeal her sexual misconduct case against President Clinton to a federal appeals court."
NEWS
April 2, 1998
THE RATIONALE for independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr to investigate President Clinton's private life was that he had allegedly lied in a deposition in Paula Corbin Jones' lawsuit against him charging sexual harassment and encouraged others to lie.The Jones lawsuit always seemed on shaky legal ground. Now that U.S. District Judge Susan Webber Wright, a Republican appointee, has dismissed it on April Fool's Day as falling "far short of the rigorous standards for establishing a claim of outrage under Arkansas law," Mr. Starr and the Justice Department must figure out what his inquiry is about and whether it should go forward.
NEWS
By Steven Lubet | February 4, 1998
PRESIDENT Clinton's attorneys recently asked the judge in the Paula Corbin Jones case to move up the trial date, arguing that the case needed the controlled setting of a courtroom, away from "gossip, innuendo and hearsay being passed off as fact."But their aggressive tactics are the last thing the president needs. Instead, the better tactic would be to walk away from the matter tomorrow, by taking immediate steps to get the sordid lawsuit off the front page.How to do this? The president would simply tell his attorneys to stop defending the case.
NEWS
January 24, 1998
A caption in the Today section yesterday misstated the nature of Paula Corbin Jones' allegation against President Clinton. Jones has accused the president of sexual harassment.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 1/24/98
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 26, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The woman who is suing President Clinton, claiming he made unwanted sexual advances toward her in 1991, moved yesterday to put new pressure on him to settle the case out of court.The woman, Paula Corbin Jones, a former Arkansas state employee, said at a sometimes tearful news conference here that "all I want is to reclaim my good name from Bill Clinton, the only person in the world who can do that."Gilbert K. Davis, one of her attorneys, told reporters that a proposal to settle the case "is still on the table," even though two prior efforts to reach a settlement have failed.
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | May 12, 1994
IMAGINE that Anita Hill had come forward with her accusations against Clarence Thomas more than a year after he had been confirmed by the Senate.Imagine that she had chosen to introduce herself to the American people at a press conference sponsored by the ACLU and NOW, accompanied by a sworn enemy of Judge Thomas who had made a cottage industry of digging up dirt.Imagine that a friend of the judge was willing to swear under oath that he had been told by an attorney for Ms. Hill that she might be persuaded not to go public in exchange for a job.Imagine that she then announced that the only way to get satisfaction was to bring a suit asking for $700,000 in damages.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | January 13, 1998
WASHINGTON -- A lawyer for Paula Corbin Jones said yesterday that settlement efforts had collapsed in her sexual harassment lawsuit against President Clinton, setting the stage for the two to meet in a historic deposition, tentatively set for Saturday.David Pyke, one of the team of Dallas attorneys representing Jones, confirmed that his side had made an offer a month ago seeking $2 million plus a statement from Clinton that was essentially an apology.But the president's attorneys rebuffed it, Pyke said, blaming them for leaking the offer to the press.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The original question was this: What, if anything, happened between Paula Corbin Jones and President Clinton in a Little Rock hotel on May 8, 1991?But now that the lawyers have worked their way to the Supreme Court, there is a second question: Who is paying the legal bills?It is not Paula Jones or Bill Clinton. And in a case in which both sides pay keen attention to their public relations victories and setbacks, the issue of legal fees is being debated as vigorously as the underlying facts of the suit itself.
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