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Paul Simon

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By Doug Adrianson and Doug Adrianson,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 21, 1990
New York - Paul Simon, the pop star most likely to make the cover of National Geographic, is snug back in his native habitat this afternoon as a chilly squall blows pedestrians up Broadway far below his office window.Even on a busy day, the mood is cool efficiency here at Simon Central, a maroon-carpeted suite of oak built-ins, glass brick and full-grown ficus trees in the Brill Building, the Pentagon of American popular music. A glass cabinet displays a dozen Grammy awards; gold and platinum records cover an entire wall.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 17, 1990
When it comes to pop exoticism, few performers can match the musical acumen of Paul Simon. It isn't simply that he has taste enough to seek out Andean folk groups or South African superstars; what makes the difference is that he turns his collaborations into hits, as he has proved from the reggae-tinged "Mother And Child Reunion" to the gospel-fueled "Loves Me Like a Rock."Still, it was his Grammy-winning 1986 album, "Graceland," that proved his reputation as a taste-maker. As an act of music appreciation, it was a masterstroke, introducing millions to the pleasures of Zulu pop styles like mbaqanga and mbube.
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By Tom Moon and Tom Moon,Knight-Ridder | October 16, 1990
NEW YORK -- Ethno-musicologists will recognize the cadences of Brazilian tribal drumming.Fans of Afropop will identify the shimmering, interlocking lines of the West African guitarists.And those who pay attention to lyrics will appreciate the terse phrases, the sudden shifts of perspective, the rhythmic rightness of the lines.But none of them will be able to call "The Rhythm of the Saints," Paul Simon's long-awaited new album being released today, exclusively their own.For a poet and a one-man band whose aural palette now includes pan pipes, talking drums and other elements of world music, this represents something of a victory.
NEWS
October 7, 1990
Republican senatorial candidate Representative Lynn Martin is finding that running against what she calls "an icon" is not easy, but she's doing all she can to pull him -- Democratic Sen. Paul Simon -- down.Ms. Martin, trailing Mr. Simon badly all summer, has seized on three negative news stories about the long-respected Mr. Simon in an effort to crack his reputation for integrity. The stories have caused considerable embarrassment for Mr. Simon, but so far his protective shell of 40 years of public service appears to be essentially intact.
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By Michael Hill | October 5, 1990
PBS' "GREAT PERFORMANCES" kicks off its 18th season tonight with a refreshing reach beyond its normal range, which is usually restricted to the traditionally circumscribed notions of high culture.But tonight, instead of Zubin Mehta or Joan Sutherland, you get Spike Lee and Debbie Allen. And instead of symphonies or ballets, you get a sound as natural as a breeze in the trees, as gritty as the banging of a trash can on an inner city street -- a cappella music. "Spike & Co.: Do It A Cappella" will be on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67, tonight at 9 o'clock.
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