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By Steve McKerrow | August 15, 1991
On The Weekend Watch:RHYMIN' ALL NIGHT -- Whew! For many viewers it can be a whole evening of Paul Simon's lyrical, sensitive music tonight. The durable pop singer is scheduled to perform live in concert from New York's Central Park, beginning at 7 p.m. on the HBO premium cable service (and preceded by a half-hour special preview at 6:30). What is especially cute is that the free performance is billed as a kind of memorial observance of Simon's memorable reunion with partner Art Garfunkel 10 years ago in the Manhattan park.
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By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2011
A man died after receiving multiple gunshot wounds during a home invasion Saturday night on the 200 block of N. Hilton Street, Baltimore police said. According to police, three armed suspects entered a home on Hilton Street shortly after 9 p.m. and took various items from people inside. Paul Simons III, 23, arrived at the home a short time later, saw the suspects and tried to escape. At least one suspect shot Simons as he fled, and he was transported to Maryland Shock Trauma, where he later died from his injuries.
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By Doug Adrianson and Doug Adrianson,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 21, 1990
New York - Paul Simon, the pop star most likely to make the cover of National Geographic, is snug back in his native habitat this afternoon as a chilly squall blows pedestrians up Broadway far below his office window.Even on a busy day, the mood is cool efficiency here at Simon Central, a maroon-carpeted suite of oak built-ins, glass brick and full-grown ficus trees in the Brill Building, the Pentagon of American popular music. A glass cabinet displays a dozen Grammy awards; gold and platinum records cover an entire wall.
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June 23, 2007
On Thursday, June 21, 2007, PAULE SIMONE INGBERG. Beloved mother of Suzanne Hoffman; sister of Michel Vallet. Friends may call Sunday, 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. at Donaldson Funeral Home, P.A., 313 Talbott Avenue, Laurel, MD, where services will be held on Monday at 10 A.M. Interment in Ivy Hill Cemetery, Laurel, MD. Memorial donations may be made to the Hospice of Howard County, Hospice of Baltimore or the Alzheimer's Association. Please visit www.donaldsonfunerlalhome.com
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By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 13, 1991
Some pop stars get trapped in their past and close out their careers endlessly replaying old favorites. Others get trapped by their past, struggling in vain to concoct new material that's as interesting or inventive as their back catalog.Paul Simon, though, has avoided both problems. Not only does his recent work, inspired by the music of Africa and Brazil, rank among his best, but -- as his performance at the Baltimore Arena last night demonstrated -- he even manages to make his oldest hits seem fresh and exciting.
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By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | March 13, 1991
THANKING THE CROWD for coming to the show is standard fare at any concert. It is the right and polite thing to do. But it isn't very often that you hear a performer say "it was my pleasure."When Paul Simon walked off the stage at the Baltimore Arena last night, it was hard to tell who was happier with the show -- he or his adoring audience of more than 10,000.Unlike 1987's overwrought "Graceland" production, there were no troupes of African dancers, no long-winded breaks in the sounds of Simon and no walking away with a feeling of unfulfillment.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | March 5, 1993
Let's face it -- any time we think of rock documentaries on TV, the automatic assumption is that we're talking MTV. After all, what other outlet would devote time and attention to the thoughts and words of mere pop stars?Would you believe public television?If not, then you'll be in for a shock Saturday evening, when Maryland Public Television (Channels 22 and 67) trots out "Paul Simon: Born at the Right Time" as part of its current pledge drive, because this two-hour special (beginning at 8 p.m.)
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By Tom Moon and Tom Moon,Knight-Ridder | October 16, 1990
NEW YORK -- Ethno-musicologists will recognize the cadences of Brazilian tribal drumming.Fans of Afropop will identify the shimmering, interlocking lines of the West African guitarists.And those who pay attention to lyrics will appreciate the terse phrases, the sudden shifts of perspective, the rhythmic rightness of the lines.But none of them will be able to call "The Rhythm of the Saints," Paul Simon's long-awaited new album being released today, exclusively their own.For a poet and a one-man band whose aural palette now includes pan pipes, talking drums and other elements of world music, this represents something of a victory.
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By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | January 8, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- American pop singer Paul Simon landed in South Africa yesterday for a concert tour that ends this country's cultural isolation from the rest of the world.Dressed in black and wearing dark glasses, the singer arrived at Johannesburg's Jan Smuts International Airport to begin a two-week tour that is expected to draw huge crowds.When the tour begins Saturday, Mr. Simon will become the first major artist to perform in South Africa since the government began political reforms two years ago aimed at ending the apartheid system of racial discrimination.
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By Jerelyn Eddings and Jerelyn Eddings,Johannesburg Bureau of The Sun | January 12, 1992
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- Rock and roll star Paul Simon ended South Africa's isolation from the popular music world yesterday with a rollicking concert that brought the music of his hit "Graceland" album back to its roots.The U.S. singer thrilled an audience of more than 30,000 fans who danced and swayed and cheered through a three-hour performance. Most of them had never seen him in live concert because of a 10-year-old international ban that prevented foreign artists from performing in South Africa.
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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,'SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | June 14, 2004
Over the years, the two have said some nasty things to one another and stormed out of rooms, slamming doors and fuming. After becoming the most successful folk-pop duo of the 1960s, the guys abruptly went their separate ways - at times, not speaking to each other for months. Even years. But Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel are still, as the title of their 1968 classic says, "old friends." Their bumpy relationship has endured half a century. "I don't resent anything about Paul Simon," says Garfunkel, who's calling from a New York City hotel suite.
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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 16, 2003
Reprinted from late editions of yesterday's Sun. WASHINGTON - They have been friends for half a century. Together, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel have created gorgeous music. Simon has written detailed lyrics that tell indelible stories about growing up, growing old, dissolutions and the many facets of love. The pair has broken up and reunited several times over the years. But at Sunday night's sold-out show at MCI Center, Simon and Garfunkel celebrated their legendary career with a brisk, no-frills rundown of their greatest hits.
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By Jamie Stiehm | December 16, 2003
WE THE people just lost one of the good guys. Paul Simon, the Illinois Democrat who always wore a bow tie and a smile, served in the state legislature and then spent 22 consecutive years in Congress - 10 in the House, 12 in the Senate. He died last week at age 75 after undergoing heart surgery and endorsing former Vermont Gov. Howard Dean for president from his hospital bed. Mr. Simon ran for president in 1988. He also sat on the Senate Judiciary Committee that heard the riveting testimony of Clarence Thomas and his accuser, Anita Hill, during Supreme Court confirmation hearings in 1991.
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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | December 15, 2003
They have been friends for half a century. Together, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel have created gorgeous music. Simon has written detailed lyrics that tell indelible stories about growing up, growing old, dissolutions and the many facets of love. The pair has broken up and reunited several times over the years. But at last night's sold-out show at MCI Center, Simon and Garfunkel celebrated their legendary career with a brisk, no-frills rundown of their greatest hits. No, the harmonies aren't as gossamer-light as they used to be. The same voices that rose like mist in the 1960s are a little creaky these days -- particularly on the uptempo cuts, during which the stellar seven-piece band outshone (and almost overpowered)
NEWS
By Nick Anderson and Nick Anderson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 10, 2003
WASHINGTON - Former Sen. Paul Simon, a Democrat who ran for president in 1988 as a budget-balancing liberal, died yesterday of complications after heart surgery in his home state of Illinois. He was 75. On Monday, Mr. Simon underwent single-bypass heart-valve surgery at St. John's Hospital in Springfield, according to Southern Illinois University, where he worked in public policy. Mr. Simon began as a populist Democrat, winning a seat in the Illinois Legislature in 1954. He was lieutenant governor of Illinois from 1969 to 1973 and served five terms in the House of Representatives before being elected to the U.S. Senate in 1984.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 5, 2003
Uncommonly blessed with multiple talents, Leonard Bernstein faced multiple conflicts in his life - sexuality, politics, faith. Above all, faith. He struggled mightily with his own Hebrew upbringing in his Kaddish Symphony and went interdenominational with his alternately dazzling and dismaying, ultimately affecting Mass. Subtitled "a theatre piece for singers, players and dancers," it was composed for the opening of the Kennedy Center in 1971. It pleased some (I'll never forget the sheer emotional - and communal - rush of the first preview performance that September night)
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | October 17, 1990
When it comes to pop exoticism, few performers can match the musical acumen of Paul Simon. It isn't simply that he has taste enough to seek out Andean folk groups or South African superstars; what makes the difference is that he turns his collaborations into hits, as he has proved from the reggae-tinged "Mother And Child Reunion" to the gospel-fueled "Loves Me Like a Rock."Still, it was his Grammy-winning 1986 album, "Graceland," that proved his reputation as a taste-maker. As an act of music appreciation, it was a masterstroke, introducing millions to the pleasures of Zulu pop styles like mbaqanga and mbube.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 8, 1998
"The Capeman," Paul Simon's much beleaguered and highly publicized Broadway musical, opened Jan. 29 to scathing reviews. The $11 million show had postponed its originally announced Jan. 8 opening -- a practice that has had dire consequences for past Broadway musicals.During its painful gestation, the show toted up four directors. The most recent hire was Jerry Zaks, a Broadway veteran. Zaks trimmed a half-hour out of the production and also brought in choreographer Joey McKneely, although Mark Morris, a leading figure in modern dance, remained the show's director and choreographer of record.
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By Abe Novick | February 21, 2001
WHY DEBATE whether the media influences bad behavior? They do. Period. That's what advertising is about. It sells a product. How does it do it? Simple. By creating an image of an item that makes you want it. So when questions arise over whether white rapper Eminem or any other pop star influences society, it should be a moot point. Celebrities are created in the same way as brands -- manufactured and positioned. Consumer brands depend on advertising agencies. Celebrities and movie stars are made and spun by movie studio executives, talent agencies and handlers like Michael Ovitz.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 3, 2000
Over the course of his last few albums, Paul Simon has gone through distinct phases, each determined by his musical interest of the moment. When he was attracted to South African mbaqanga music, we had "Graceland"; when he was enchanted by the sound of Brazil, we got "The Rhythm of the Saints"; and when he indulged his love for doo-wop and fascination with the music of Puerto Rico, there was "Songs from The Capeman." Thus, with the release of "You're the One" (arriving in stores today)
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