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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 24, 2009
Christine D. Sarbanes, a retired educator, active board member and wife of former Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, died Sunday of cancer at her Guilford home. She was 73. "Her life and legacy as a teacher and community servant touched thousands of Marylanders and reminds us all that a life lived for others is the greatest of gifts," Gov. Martin O'Malley said in a statement Monday. "She believed in the dignity of every individual, and that every person has potential that we, as a community, can unlock through literacy and access to higher learning."
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NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2010
Democratic Rep. Elijah Cummings accused Republicans of deliberately trying to make economic conditions worse for their own political gain at a Democratic Labor Day picnic Monday, as political rhetoric among Democrats heats up with Election Day's approach. Cummings, who represents most of western Howard County and Ellicott City, made a long, impassioned speech at the annual picnic at Cedar Lane Park, which also drew retired U.S. Sen. Paul Sarbanes, who accompanied his son, Rep. John Sarbanes (who represents portions of the eastern county)
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NEWS
October 23, 2000
AFTER FOUR TERMS in the Senate, and three in the House, Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes has compiled a commendable record on Capitol Hill. He has been especially diligent in securing funds to address Baltimore's problems and at getting Maryland governors what they want from Washington. Mr. Sarbanes does not crave the media spotlight or hold center stage during Senate debates. He is a cerebral lawmaker whose impact is more often felt in backroom committee discussions over amendments to bills. Mr. Sarbanes has mastered the inner workings of Congress.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | April 4, 2009
Christine Sarbanes was recalled at her standing-room-only memorial service Friday as a "strong woman of incisive intellect" who "had the capacity to find the good in everyone." Her children said she routinely addressed them with, "Hello, lovely." Vice President Joe Biden, one of numerous elected national and state leaders who gathered at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, spoke of his days in the Senate with former Sen. Paul Sarbanes. Christine Sarbanes, 73, died March 22. The vice president, who spoke for 10 minutes, recalled the Sarbanes' overseas trips together.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 5, 2002
WASHINGTON - As the congressional election year opened in January, Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes found himself thrust onto center stage of the nation's top political and business drama - the collapse of Enron. Enron provided Democrats with a potential campaign issue to use against Republicans, giving them fresh ammunition for their charge that the GOP is too cozy with corporate America. Newly minted Democratic Senate committee chairmen such as Sarbanes, who had taken over the banking panel six months earlier, were handed a mandate to lead the charge by pressing for investor protections that voters appeared to demand.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 15, 1994
"I love Parris in the springtime, I love Parris in the fall." -- New state anthem.Cheer up. Marion Barry is redeemed.Bill Brock and Paul Sarbanes can really discuss the issues. Voters don't want that, it's boring. They want sleaze, slime and slurp. Sorry, wrong guys.So long, Helen. It's been real.
NEWS
March 29, 1991
Doves in war, hawks in peace. That's one way to describe Maryland's two senators, Barbara Mikulski and Paul Sarbanes. Along with most members of their party, they voted dovishly to deny President Bush the authority to use armed force against Saddam Hussein's Iraq. Then, after the war was won, they showed how hawkish they could be by voting to cut off aid to King Hussein's Jordan as punishment for its support of the Iraqi cause.In both instances, these Democratic senators were seeking to thwart and constrict a Republican president.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | January 5, 2007
It was early in the campaign last year for Maryland's open congressional seat, and John Sarbanes was in Boston for a fundraiser. Appearing before an audience that included classmates from Harvard Law School and fellow Greek-Americans, he spoke about how the nation's reputation in the world depended on a foreign policy that was respectful of other countries. That talk - not just the ideas, but the reasoned and deliberate way he expressed them - put at least one old family friend in mind of Sarbanes' father.
NEWS
July 1, 1994
Alan Neece, a lobbyist who contributed $5,000 to eat salmon and chicken with Paul Sarbanes last Tuesday, explained why:"I've talked to a lot of senators tonight. It's access. Otherwise you have to stand in line at the Capitol to say 'thank you' to a senator who's walked the plank. This is democracy at its best."No, it's influence peddling at its best. The Senate is so ashamed of itself that it voted last year to ban exactly this. Under this still-pending proposal, no lobbyist could contribute to a senator's campaign fund (which is what the dinner was for)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | April 4, 2009
Christine Sarbanes was recalled at her standing-room-only memorial service Friday as a "strong woman of incisive intellect" who "had the capacity to find the good in everyone." Her children said she routinely addressed them with, "Hello, lovely." Vice President Joe Biden, one of numerous elected national and state leaders who gathered at the Enoch Pratt Free Library, spoke of his days in the Senate with former Sen. Paul Sarbanes. Christine Sarbanes, 73, died March 22. The vice president, who spoke for 10 minutes, recalled the Sarbanes' overseas trips together.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | March 24, 2009
Christine D. Sarbanes, a retired educator, active board member and wife of former Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, died Sunday of cancer at her Guilford home. She was 73. "Her life and legacy as a teacher and community servant touched thousands of Marylanders and reminds us all that a life lived for others is the greatest of gifts," Gov. Martin O'Malley said in a statement Monday. "She believed in the dignity of every individual, and that every person has potential that we, as a community, can unlock through literacy and access to higher learning."
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun reporter | January 5, 2007
It was early in the campaign last year for Maryland's open congressional seat, and John Sarbanes was in Boston for a fundraiser. Appearing before an audience that included classmates from Harvard Law School and fellow Greek-Americans, he spoke about how the nation's reputation in the world depended on a foreign policy that was respectful of other countries. That talk - not just the ideas, but the reasoned and deliberate way he expressed them - put at least one old family friend in mind of Sarbanes' father.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Columnist | September 19, 2006
In a speech on primary election night, congressional candidate John Sarbanes said that early in the campaign, voters had said to him, "If you do half the job your father did, you have my vote." Later, voters started saying, "If you do a quarter of the job your father did, you have my vote." John Sarbanes came to the conclusion "that my father's stock had gone way up." He was speaking lightly, but his family name was a serious matter during his successful primary campaign in the 3rd Congressional District.
NEWS
By ANDREW A. GREEN and ANDREW A. GREEN,SUN REPORTER | October 4, 2005
John P. Sarbanes, the son of five-term Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, plans to announce his candidacy for Congress this month, seeking to occupy one of the elected offices opened by the trickle-down effect of his father's retirement. Head of the health care practice at the Baltimore law firm Venable LLP, Sarbanes, a Democrat, plans to enter an increasingly crowded field to replace Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin in Maryland's 3rd District. Cardin is running for Paul Sarbanes' Senate seat. In a letter to supporters, John Sarbanes said his professional and volunteer experience in health care, education and other fields have prepared him to serve in Congress.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2005
Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes fainted yesterday during a funeral service in New Jersey and was hospitalized for observation, a spokesman said. The cause of Sarbanes' fainting episode had not been determined, said Jesse Jacobs, his press secretary. Barring unforeseen changes in his condition, Sarbanes was to be released today from University Hospital in Newark, N.J., and return to Washington in time for morning votes, Jacobs said. He was in fair condition last night, said hospital spokesman Rogers Ramsey.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 13, 2005
PAUL Sarbanes: Never indicted. It's possible he's never even been audited. He certainly hasn't embarrassed anybody around here. I used to turn on 680, WCBM-AM, at night, and within minutes of doing so, I could hear Les Kinsolving, one of the great, fire-breathing conservative kooks, picking on Sarbanes. You could always count on Kinsolving for that. But Loopy Les seemed to be the only one who took shots on a regular basis. Maryland's cerebral, taciturn senator just didn't give critics a lot of mud to work with.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | May 17, 2005
Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes fainted yesterday during a funeral service in New Jersey and was hospitalized for observation, a spokesman said. The cause of Sarbanes' fainting episode had not been determined, said Jesse Jacobs, his press secretary. Barring unforeseen changes in his condition, Sarbanes was to be released today from University Hospital in Newark, N.J., and return to Washington in time for morning votes, Jacobs said. He was in fair condition last night, said hospital spokesman Rogers Ramsey.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1997
ARINC Inc. of Annapolis has won a contract worth a potential $73.9 million to provide technical support to the Naval Air Warfare Center at Patuxent River.The one-year, $8 million contract has four years of options that greatly increase its potential value.ARINC, which designs and operates communications and information processing systems, will lead a team of smaller companies in the work.The job involves supporting aircraft testing activities consolidated at Patuxent River by the federal Base Realignment and Closure Commission.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | October 30, 2003
THERE WERE more than 1,000 people in the room at the time, but sometimes I think I must be the only person who ever saw Paul Sarbanes get emotional. This was nearly 20 years ago, down at the dimly lighted steelworkers hall on Dundalk Avenue, and it was one of those hot, ridiculously humid summer nights in Baltimore, and Sarbanes was screaming evangelistically and sweating through a blue oxford shirt with the sleeves rolled up. He was screaming populist rhetoric into a microphone - I think he might have been campaigning for Walter Mondale at the time - and, while I can't recall the Maryland senator's exact words, I remember their result - football-stadium-sized cheers from the last of the old-line, union-solid, blue-collar Baltimore Democrats who hadn't voted for Reagan.
NEWS
By Ross K. Baker | August 9, 2002
EVERYONE HAS has heard of the "do-nothing" Congress. Well, call this the "do-something" Congress. Before this current two-year session is over in January, the 107th Congress will be able to boast of the most impressive list of accomplishments of any Congress since the days of the Johnson administration in the 1960s. Whether or not you agree with everything it has done, there is no way one could characterize this Congress as unresponsive or lazy. It is true that the homeland security bill will be put over until after the August recess; this legislation represents the most extensive consolidation of federal government agencies since the 1948 reorganization that combined the departments of War and Navy and created an independent Air Force under the new Department of Defense.
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