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Paul Robeson

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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Some voices are so unmistakable, so incredibly distinctive that they seem to burn into your memory, even your soul. You don't have to hear such a voice in person; a recording, however old and worn, will do the trick. That's how I fell under the spell of so many great singers from the past. Ponselle. Callas. Bjorling. And Paul Robeson, the subject of "The Tallest Tree in the Forest," a fascinating play written and performed by Daniel Beaty at Arena Stage in a sterling production directed by Moises Kaufman.  With Robeson, of course, you are dealing with much, much more than a deep, enveloping, bottomless tone and vividly communicative phrasing.
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NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | April 3, 2014
If great theater is your thing, Arena Stage is the place to be. The Southwest Washington, D.C., theater has been on a roll this season, with exceptional plays that covered a broad range of subjects, featuring well-known cast members. I've always felt that Arena Stage's productions have reflected the diversity of the nation's capital and this season has been no exception. I haven't seen the entire lineup, but many this season fall in that category, such as the by-popular-demand repeat performance of the explosive "One Night With Janis Joplin.
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NEWS
By HANS KNIGHT | January 26, 1997
ONCE IN A while, I turn on my stereo, close my eyes and let the voice flow over me, so dark and rich I feel I can almost touch it. One critic once called it "the finest musical instrument wrought by Nature in our time." Another described it as "so nearly perfect as to be almost inhuman." Yet another praised the possessor of the voice as "the greatest natural basso of this generation."The voice belonged to Paul Robeson. If the young among us have no idea who he was, they should be forgiven.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 29, 2014
Some voices are so unmistakable, so incredibly distinctive that they seem to burn into your memory, even your soul. You don't have to hear such a voice in person; a recording, however old and worn, will do the trick. That's how I fell under the spell of so many great singers from the past. Ponselle. Callas. Bjorling. And Paul Robeson, the subject of "The Tallest Tree in the Forest," a fascinating play written and performed by Daniel Beaty at Arena Stage in a sterling production directed by Moises Kaufman.  With Robeson, of course, you are dealing with much, much more than a deep, enveloping, bottomless tone and vividly communicative phrasing.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2001
Paul Robeson had a majestic stage presence, whether in the theater or in film, at home or on the civil rights platform, and he had a rich, earthy bass voice that thrilled audiences like the rumble of Old Testament prophecy. He was the first African-American Othello of the 20th century. He played Joe in "Showboat" and made "Ol' Man River" into a sort of personal anthem. He revived the traditional black church spirituals when they were thought of as common, and he sang them in their pure simplicity as art songs.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1999
Paul Robeson(1898-1976)Robeson, the youngest son of an escaped slave, graduated from Rutgers University, later Columbia Law School and went on to be primarily an actor and a singer.Robeson was blacklisted during the McCarthy era for the loyalty to Russia that he had developed. It was during this period that he wrote "Here I Stand."In it he discusses how his political views came about. He also used the book to encourage blacks in continuing the Civil Rights Movement independently while being mindful of their heritage.
NEWS
August 10, 2008
The Columbia Pro Cantare will hold auditions for all parts in its 32nd season of concerts. Among the works to be performed are Carl Orff's Carmina Burana, Handel's Messiah, Brahms' Requiem, and a Tribute to Paul Robeson, with baritone Lester Lynch and the chorus. Auditions will be held at a private home in Harper's Choice. Rehearsals, to be held from 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesdays at Hammond High School, begin Sept. 2. www.howardcountymd.gov/oa/50+expo.htm.
SPORTS
January 6, 1998
Where: Coppin State CollegeWho: 20 boys and girls basketball teams from Baltimore, Washington, Pennsylvania and New York competing for three days and also participating in special seminars on Scholastic Assessment Test preparation and visits to area museums.Tickets: $8 per gameBoys scheduleThursday -- City vs. Douglass, 6 p.m.; Randallstown vs. Mervo, 9 p.m.Friday -- Strawberry Mansion (Pa.) vs. Southwestern, 3 p.m.; John Jay High (NY) vs. Walbrook, 4: 30 p.m.; Abraham Lincoln (NY) vs. Southern, 6 p.m.; Franklin Learning Center (Pa.)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 24, 1999
In a month marked by an unusual number of outstanding documentaries on aspects of African-American history, PBS' "Paul Robeson: Here I Stand" seems like a near-perfect grand finale.The "American Masters" documentary tells the story of a brilliant and horribly persecuted black man who comes closer, perhaps, than any other American of the century to fulfilling the definition of Renaissance Man.This is, as PBS claims, the first definitive biography of Robeson, and more's the shame on us as a culture that it took this long.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | January 25, 2007
Dogs' day If you've got a penchant for pooches, make your way to the Northeastern Maryland Kennel Club Dog Match in Churchville this weekend. More than 200 dogs will compete in breed and obedience matches at the Churchville Recreation Center. Categories are hounds, sporting, working, non-sporting, terriers, toys and herding groups. Obedience matches will features classes ranging from pre-novice to advanced-utility. The breed matches run from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and the obedience matches from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday at the Churchville Recreation Center, Glenville Road and Route 155, Churchville.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | January 10, 2013
The civil rights movement was full of dynamic and evocative images. Today, even many of us born after its iconic moments were captured on film can describe Martin Luther King Jr.'s outstretched arm pointing a sea of people toward a future decades beyond the short span of his life, or German shepherds in Birmingham ripping into black skin, as if we had watched these events live. But 50 years after the March on Washington, one local institution is helping audiences revisit this period in American history and examine details that were largely overlooked.
NEWS
August 10, 2008
The Columbia Pro Cantare will hold auditions for all parts in its 32nd season of concerts. Among the works to be performed are Carl Orff's Carmina Burana, Handel's Messiah, Brahms' Requiem, and a Tribute to Paul Robeson, with baritone Lester Lynch and the chorus. Auditions will be held at a private home in Harper's Choice. Rehearsals, to be held from 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Tuesdays at Hammond High School, begin Sept. 2. www.howardcountymd.gov/oa/50+expo.htm.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears | January 25, 2007
Dogs' day If you've got a penchant for pooches, make your way to the Northeastern Maryland Kennel Club Dog Match in Churchville this weekend. More than 200 dogs will compete in breed and obedience matches at the Churchville Recreation Center. Categories are hounds, sporting, working, non-sporting, terriers, toys and herding groups. Obedience matches will features classes ranging from pre-novice to advanced-utility. The breed matches run from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and the obedience matches from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday at the Churchville Recreation Center, Glenville Road and Route 155, Churchville.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2001
Paul Robeson had a majestic stage presence, whether in the theater or in film, at home or on the civil rights platform, and he had a rich, earthy bass voice that thrilled audiences like the rumble of Old Testament prophecy. He was the first African-American Othello of the 20th century. He played Joe in "Showboat" and made "Ol' Man River" into a sort of personal anthem. He revived the traditional black church spirituals when they were thought of as common, and he sang them in their pure simplicity as art songs.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,SUN STAFF | January 9, 2000
Junior guard Melvin Scott scored a game-high 25 points, including four straight free throws in the final 1: 30, to help the Southern Bulldogs (7-3) defeat Newport Prep, 56-50, for their second win in two nights in the fourth annual Mayor's Academy Basketball Tournament at Coppin State. Scott's free throws broke a 46-46 tie and gave No. 6 Southern the lead for good. Scott, who scored 46 points in the two games, accepted tournament MVP honors from Baltimore City Mayor Martin O'Malley. "Melvin is a tremendous player and tremendous human being," said Southern coach Meredith Smith of his 6-foot-2 junior.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1999
Paul Robeson(1898-1976)Robeson, the youngest son of an escaped slave, graduated from Rutgers University, later Columbia Law School and went on to be primarily an actor and a singer.Robeson was blacklisted during the McCarthy era for the loyalty to Russia that he had developed. It was during this period that he wrote "Here I Stand."In it he discusses how his political views came about. He also used the book to encourage blacks in continuing the Civil Rights Movement independently while being mindful of their heritage.
NEWS
October 12, 1994
Barbara W. Moffett, 71, a director of community relations for the American Friends Service Committee who helped the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. publish his "Letter from the Birmingham Jail," died Saturday in Philadelphia.Chaim Raphael, 86, scholar and thriller writer who wrote under the pen name Jocelyn Davey, died Monday in a London hospital. "The Undoubted Deed," "The Naked Villainy" and "The Road from Babylon" are among his best-known works.James Monks, 81, an actor who began his career on Broadway in the 1930s and later worked in movies and modeling, died of cancer Sunday at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital in New York City.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 24, 1999
In a month marked by an unusual number of outstanding documentaries on aspects of African-American history, PBS' "Paul Robeson: Here I Stand" seems like a near-perfect grand finale.The "American Masters" documentary tells the story of a brilliant and horribly persecuted black man who comes closer, perhaps, than any other American of the century to fulfilling the definition of Renaissance Man.This is, as PBS claims, the first definitive biography of Robeson, and more's the shame on us as a culture that it took this long.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 21, 1998
Steve Yeager is starting production on "In Bad Taste," a follow-up to "Divine Trash," his award-winning documentary about the early career of John Waters. "In Bad Taste" will take up where "Divine Trash" left off, following Waters' career from "Pink Flamingos" through his new film, "Pecker.""We don't know if it's going to be 60 minutes or 90 minutes," Yeager said, "but it will air on Bravo and the Independent Film Channel starting in late January." "In Bad Taste" will follow "the same basic format as 'Divine Trash,' " according to Yeager.
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