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NEWS
August 8, 2011
August 30, 1961: Paul Richards managed his last game - a win - with the Orioles. Luman Harris replaced him.
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SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
1954 Record: 54-100 Place: Seventh in American League Manager: Jimmy Dykes Most Valuable Oriole: Chuck Diering Batting leader: Cal Abrams (.293) Home run leader: Vern Stephens (8) RBI leader: Vern Stephens (46) Wins leader: Bob Turley (14) ERA leader: Duane Pillette (3.12) Notable: After 52 years as the St. Louis Browns, the Orioles played their first home game in Memorial Stadium on April 15, a 3-1 win over the Chicago White Sox. After the season, new manager-general manager Paul Richards completed a 17-player swap - the largest in Major League Baseball history - that brought catcher Gus Triandos, outfielder Gene Woodling and eight other players to the Orioles.
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SPORTS
The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
1954 Record: 54-100 Place: Seventh in American League Manager: Jimmy Dykes Most Valuable Oriole: Chuck Diering Batting leader: Cal Abrams (.293) Home run leader: Vern Stephens (8) RBI leader: Vern Stephens (46) Wins leader: Bob Turley (14) ERA leader: Duane Pillette (3.12) Notable: After 52 years as the St. Louis Browns, the Orioles played their first home game in Memorial Stadium on April 15, a 3-1 win over the Chicago White Sox. After the season, new manager-general manager Paul Richards completed a 17-player swap - the largest in Major League Baseball history - that brought catcher Gus Triandos, outfielder Gene Woodling and eight other players to the Orioles.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2012
Sept. 1, 1996: Quarterback Vinny Testaverde pumps his fist and an announced record football crowd (64,124) at Memorial Stadium whoops it up as the fledgling Ravens win their opener, 19-14 over the Oakland Raiders. "To come from behind, in front of a full house, it probably doesn't get much better than this," says Ted Marchibroda, coach of the first-year team. "It's a shame we have to play 15 more. " Sept. 1, 1978: Orioles right-hander Sammy Stewart sets a record for a pitcher in his major league debut by striking out seven consecutive batters in a 9-3 victory over the visiting Chicago White Sox. "I wouldn't know how to rate it, but it feels good," says Stewart, whose mark is equaled in 2010 by the Washington Nationals' Stephen Strasburg.
NEWS
May 29, 1992
For proof that happiness can come in small packages, readers should rush to the bookstore and pick up a volume entitled "Baseball Wit and Wisdom." Maybe "volume" isn't the right word, because this tome measures only 2 1/4 by 3 1/4 inches and is only half an inch thick. But within its little pages is some of the grandest talk about the world's most beautiful game that you will ever hear.To tantalize readers, we have selected the comments of four baseball greats associated with Baltimore and the Orioles:Outfielder Reggie Jackson (who should know)
SPORTS
By BOB MAISEL | March 10, 1991
Since I started doing an occasional Sunday piece on some of the characters and personalities I've known in more than 40 years of writing sports for this paper, there have been numerous requests to include one on Paul Richards.It's not an easy assignment writing about Richards, because in a lot of ways he was a complicated individual. Those who didn't know him well considered him aloof, a sort of cold fish. But once you got past that veneer and earned his respect, there wasn't a more loyal friend or better company.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2012
Sept. 1, 1996: Quarterback Vinny Testaverde pumps his fist and an announced record football crowd (64,124) at Memorial Stadium whoops it up as the fledgling Ravens win their opener, 19-14 over the Oakland Raiders. "To come from behind, in front of a full house, it probably doesn't get much better than this," says Ted Marchibroda, coach of the first-year team. "It's a shame we have to play 15 more. " Sept. 1, 1978: Orioles right-hander Sammy Stewart sets a record for a pitcher in his major league debut by striking out seven consecutive batters in a 9-3 victory over the visiting Chicago White Sox. "I wouldn't know how to rate it, but it feels good," says Stewart, whose mark is equaled in 2010 by the Washington Nationals' Stephen Strasburg.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | June 3, 2009
The Oriole with the hurricane swing turns 75 today. Happy birthday, Diamond Jim. What's the best gift for someone your age? "To live to be 76," Jim Gentile said. In the early 1960s, he was Baltimore's tempestuous slugger, a fiery first baseman with a whiplike cut that battered the air and roused the crowds, contact or no. Watching Gentile flail was as entertaining as seeing his home runs soar out of Memorial Stadium. Strikeouts begat tantrums, broken bats, smashed water coolers and ejections.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | January 15, 1993
No drum rolls or trumpets are sounding, but there should be. Gus Triandos is "home" again. The Orioles' first hero has returned for a visit, which makes for fond memories, jocular reminiscing and an awareness that his still-loyal fan club is approaching senior-citizen status.This is where a street in Baltimore County was named in his honor. It's called Triandos Drive. In his self-deprecating sense of humor, he wonders if homeowners there ever requested a name change."Gee, to think I spent eight years with the Orioles and never saw Fort McHenry," he said after arriving to attend a memorabilia show tomorrow and Sunday at the Pikesville Armory.
NEWS
July 21, 2004
On July 18, 2004, PAUL RICHARD FRANZ beloved husband of Jennifer D. Franz (nee Mann), dear father of Madeline B., and Jacob D. Franz, devoted son of Dorothy Klausmeyer Franz and the late Paul E. Franz, devoted brother of D. Gail Lynch. Also survived by nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the family owned Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home In., 6500 York Road (at Overbrook) on Thursday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. A memorial service will be held Friday 11 A.M. at the Friends Stony Run Meeting House.
NEWS
August 8, 2011
August 30, 1961: Paul Richards managed his last game - a win - with the Orioles. Luman Harris replaced him.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | June 3, 2009
The Oriole with the hurricane swing turns 75 today. Happy birthday, Diamond Jim. What's the best gift for someone your age? "To live to be 76," Jim Gentile said. In the early 1960s, he was Baltimore's tempestuous slugger, a fiery first baseman with a whiplike cut that battered the air and roused the crowds, contact or no. Watching Gentile flail was as entertaining as seeing his home runs soar out of Memorial Stadium. Strikeouts begat tantrums, broken bats, smashed water coolers and ejections.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
Paul Richard Kratzer, an advertising agency owner known for his offbeat ideas and enthusiastic support of the Salisbury Zoo, died Wednesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of complications after heart surgery. He was 58. Mr. Kratzer's name appeared briefly in the national media in late 1990 after he developed the IraqiWacker, a wooden paddle-ball toy that featured a caricature of Saddam Hussein's face. He donated 1,000 toys to U.S. troops massed in Saudi Arabia. "If nothing else, these IraqiWackers will sharpen our troops' eye-hand coordination and relieve the boredom," Mr. Kratzer quipped in a Dec. 1990 article in The Sun. The BushWacker, a similar toy with a picture of President George H.W. Bush, garnered less attention.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2004
Paul Richard Franz, a builder and former gold miner who renovated homes in the Butchers Hill and Hampden neighborhoods, died of leukemia Sunday at his Roland Park home. He was 54. Mr. Franz was born in Baltimore and raised on Stevenson Lane in Rodgers Forge. He was a 1968 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School and attended the University of Maryland, College Park, where he was a member of Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity. In 1970, he was drafted into the Army and served as a paratrooper and radio operator with the Special Forces.
NEWS
July 21, 2004
On July 18, 2004, PAUL RICHARD FRANZ beloved husband of Jennifer D. Franz (nee Mann), dear father of Madeline B., and Jacob D. Franz, devoted son of Dorothy Klausmeyer Franz and the late Paul E. Franz, devoted brother of D. Gail Lynch. Also survived by nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the family owned Mitchell-Wiedefeld Funeral Home In., 6500 York Road (at Overbrook) on Thursday 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 P.M. A memorial service will be held Friday 11 A.M. at the Friends Stony Run Meeting House.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | January 15, 1993
No drum rolls or trumpets are sounding, but there should be. Gus Triandos is "home" again. The Orioles' first hero has returned for a visit, which makes for fond memories, jocular reminiscing and an awareness that his still-loyal fan club is approaching senior-citizen status.This is where a street in Baltimore County was named in his honor. It's called Triandos Drive. In his self-deprecating sense of humor, he wonders if homeowners there ever requested a name change."Gee, to think I spent eight years with the Orioles and never saw Fort McHenry," he said after arriving to attend a memorabilia show tomorrow and Sunday at the Pikesville Armory.
NEWS
By ANNIE LINSKEY and ANNIE LINSKEY,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
Paul Richard Kratzer, an advertising agency owner known for his offbeat ideas and enthusiastic support of the Salisbury Zoo, died Wednesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of complications after heart surgery. He was 58. Mr. Kratzer's name appeared briefly in the national media in late 1990 after he developed the IraqiWacker, a wooden paddle-ball toy that featured a caricature of Saddam Hussein's face. He donated 1,000 toys to U.S. troops massed in Saudi Arabia. "If nothing else, these IraqiWackers will sharpen our troops' eye-hand coordination and relieve the boredom," Mr. Kratzer quipped in a Dec. 1990 article in The Sun. The BushWacker, a similar toy with a picture of President George H.W. Bush, garnered less attention.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 22, 2004
Paul Richard Franz, a builder and former gold miner who renovated homes in the Butchers Hill and Hampden neighborhoods, died of leukemia Sunday at his Roland Park home. He was 54. Mr. Franz was born in Baltimore and raised on Stevenson Lane in Rodgers Forge. He was a 1968 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School and attended the University of Maryland, College Park, where he was a member of Phi Kappa Sigma fraternity. In 1970, he was drafted into the Army and served as a paratrooper and radio operator with the Special Forces.
NEWS
May 29, 1992
For proof that happiness can come in small packages, readers should rush to the bookstore and pick up a volume entitled "Baseball Wit and Wisdom." Maybe "volume" isn't the right word, because this tome measures only 2 1/4 by 3 1/4 inches and is only half an inch thick. But within its little pages is some of the grandest talk about the world's most beautiful game that you will ever hear.To tantalize readers, we have selected the comments of four baseball greats associated with Baltimore and the Orioles:Outfielder Reggie Jackson (who should know)
SPORTS
By BOB MAISEL | March 10, 1991
Since I started doing an occasional Sunday piece on some of the characters and personalities I've known in more than 40 years of writing sports for this paper, there have been numerous requests to include one on Paul Richards.It's not an easy assignment writing about Richards, because in a lot of ways he was a complicated individual. Those who didn't know him well considered him aloof, a sort of cold fish. But once you got past that veneer and earned his respect, there wasn't a more loyal friend or better company.
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