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April 3, 2005
"I say to you today: Always be brave. Do not be afraid. Do not be afraid. Do not be afraid. God is with you. Do not be afraid to search for God always. Then you will truly be the land of the free and the home of the brave." From his Mass in Central Park, 1995
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
Ever since she met Pope John Paul II when she was a schoolgirl in 1995, Melissa Brent has frequently replayed the brief encounter in her mind. But when she learned that John Paul would be canonized as a saint this weekend, she burst into tears. "Everything was just real, all of those emotions just hit me at once. … All these years and it's like, 'Wow, I met a saint and I can feel it,' " said Brent, a 26-year-old nurse now living in Virginia Beach. In 1995, Brent was living in Columbia with her family and attending third grade at St. William of York School in Baltimore.
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FEATURES
By SID SMITH... and SID SMITH...,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 1, 2005
Two major networks are about to unveil their competing biographical treatments of Pope John Paul II, arriving as sober-minded preludes to later, lighter holiday fare. First, there's ABC's TV movie Have No Fear: The Life of John Paul II (8 p.m. tonight), then CBS' two-part miniseries, Pope John Paul II (beginning 9 p.m. Sunday). The verdict is fairly straightforward. The more star-studded CBS effort (which concludes at 8 p.m. Wednesday) is twice as long and twice as effective. ABC's Have No Fear is dignified and respectful, and it covers an even wider span of the late pope's life than the CBS venture.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
Minutes from meeting Pope John Paul II in 1995, Justin Farinelli of Pasadena had one fear racing through his mind. "I didn't want to drop the flowers," he recalled last week with a laugh. "They were almost as big as I was. " Farinelli, 9 years old at the time, was among two children selected from local Catholic churches to greet the pope when he visited Baltimore on Oct. 8, 1995. With the canonization of the late pope scheduled for Sunday, April 27, Farinelli is reflecting on the man who helped to humanize his faith.
NEWS
By Stephen J. Stahley | September 28, 1995
As a fellow priest, I welcome Pope John Paul II to our country and our city. The fact that I am married, with a child and a secular job, in no way diminishes the bond of priestly fraternity that I share with the Holy Father. We were ordained to the same Catholic priesthood. The priesthood which, according to the ancient tradition of the church, is forever. That same priesthood, instituted by Jesus at the Last Supper, to preserve the memory of His loving presence among us in the Mass.Pride and gratitudeAlong with Catholics throughout the country, I will feel immense pride and deep gratitude when the pope celebrates the Mass at Oriole Park.
NEWS
By Myriam Marquez | February 4, 1998
ONE can only cry so much about Cuba's sorry condition after 39 years of Communist dictatorship. Crumbling buildings, prostitution running rampant -- not even in dictator Fulgencio Batista's day was it that bad.Here I was watching television, staring at the Sacred Heart of Jesus, a huge mural that the Communist government placed into Havana's Plaza de la Revolucion for the pope's Sunday Mass, and crying.Here I was watching a frail-looking but forceful pope calling for political pluralism and human rights for Cuba.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and John Rivera : Sun Staff | April 3, 2005
Pope John Paul II, who died yesterday at the age of 84, was a proud son of Poland who helped break communism's hold on Eastern Europe as he kept a strict doctrinal grip on worldwide Roman Catholicism. As the first non-Italian pope since 1523, the man born as Karol Josef Wojtyla sought out crowds and cameras during his 26-year reign as no previous pontiff had. A one-time actor, he became a performer to the world, taking his spiritual message of hope, tolerance and economic justice to more than 130 countries.
TOPIC
By Larry Williams and Larry Williams,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | April 10, 2005
The death of Pope John Paul II has turned into an extraordinary global media event - surpassing in its early days coverage of the Asian tsunami, the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the deaths of former President Ronald Reagan and Princess Diana. This tidal wave of news, triggered by Pope John Paul's charismatic personality, has provided the Catholic Church with an unparalleled opportunity to present itself in a positive light. But his winning style, also set a standard of performance that represents a major challenge to the next pope, whoever he may be. There were some 100,000 major news articles and more than 12 million Internet citations mentioning the pope between his death April 2 and Friday, when his funeral was held, according to an analysis by the media tracking firm Global Language Monitor.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 3, 2005
VATICAN CITY - Pope John Paul II died yesterday, more than a quarter-century after beginning a reign that transformed the papacy. He succumbed to years of health problems that ravaged his body but did little to diminish his control of the Roman Catholic Church or his political influence across the globe. The pope, 84, died during the third day of a worldwide vigil marked most poignantly by huge crowds that gathered outside his apartment above St. Peter's Square, from where he had led them in prayer for so many years.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | October 24, 2008
Calling for a "sanctuary in a suffering city," Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien dedicated the Pope John Paul II Prayer Garden in downtown Baltimore yesterday before unveiling a bronze statue of the late pontiff. Speaking at Charles and Franklin streets, the archbishop said he hoped the new green space - the site of the demolished 100-year-old Rochambeau apartments - would become a symbol of the rebirth of "many, many more Baltimore street corners." He described Baltimore as a city "where too many street corners are just places where drug deals take place and where gunfire inevitably follows."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2013
George Frank Thompson, who made and served lunch to Pope John Paul II on his visit to Baltimore and who had earlier mixed drinks for five presidents as a Capitol Hill barman, died Dec. 14 at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 98 and lived in the Otterbein section of the Inner Harbor. Family members said that he was hurt in a fall on a transit bus two months ago and died of complications from that injury. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Edward and Emma Milburn Thompson.
NEWS
October 12, 2011
Conservative media outlets have criticized the Occupy Wall Street protesters as mob-like, left-wing extremists with no voice and no real agenda - or as the Democrats' answer to the tea party. But the protesters' critique of capitalist society can't be so easily dismissed. Pope John Paul II was a great leader who played an important role in the collapse of communism and the fall of the Berlin wall. But he was also a sharp critic of the shortcomings of capitalist societies that were not balanced with morals and values.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2011
With prayers, processions and Polish food, Roman Catholics in Baltimore joined millions of other church members worldwide Sunday in celebrating the life of the late Pope John Paul II — the only pontiff to have visited the city — as he moved a step closer to sainthood. Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien, head of the Archdiocese of Baltimore, presided over a Mass at the Basilica of the Assumption marking the Sunday after Easter as well as the beatification in Rome of John Paul II. Then, after the Mass, the archbishop led a procession around the block to a "peace" garden dedicated to the late pope for an outdoor prayer service there.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jacques Kelly | March 1, 2010
John Kennedy Gutierrez, a Woodberry-based metals artisan who was part of the design team for the Pope John Paul II Prayer Garden, died of cancer Thursday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Medfield resident was 45. "He had an indomitable spirit and the things he made were magic," said Baltimore developer William Struever. "He was a rock, a pillar of goodwill. His works were gorgeous but always enormously practical." Mr. Gutierrez worked with numerous architects and designers and helped create Woodberry Kitchen, Tapas Teatro, Red Star and Copra restaurants.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | February 26, 2010
John Kennedy Gutierrez, a Woodberry-based metals artisan who was part of the design team for the Pope John Paul II Prayer Garden, died of cancer Thursday at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Medfield resident was 45. "He had an indomitable spirit and the things he made were magic," said Baltimore developer William Struever. "He was a rock, a pillar of goodwill. His works were gorgeous but always enormously practical." Mr. Gutierrez worked with numerous architects and designers and helped create the Woodberry Kitchen, Tapas Teatro, Red Star and Copra restaurants.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,ed.gunts@baltsun.com | October 26, 2008
For religious leaders, it's a spiritual oasis near the heart of the city. For nature lovers, it's a much-needed green space, open to all. For those who value historic architecture, it symbolizes the failure of the preservation process in Baltimore. Even though it covers no more ground than a tennis court, it's hard to think of another public space with the ability to trigger so many conflicting reactions as the Pope John Paul II Prayer Garden that was dedicated last week. The $1.5 million garden was built as a complement to the recently restored Basilica of the Assumption, which occupies the same block in Baltimore's Cathedral Hill district.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | October 24, 2008
Calling for a "sanctuary in a suffering city," Archbishop Edwin F. O'Brien dedicated the Pope John Paul II Prayer Garden in downtown Baltimore yesterday before unveiling a bronze statue of the late pontiff. Speaking at Charles and Franklin streets, the archbishop said he hoped the new green space - the site of the demolished 100-year-old Rochambeau apartments - would become a symbol of the rebirth of "many, many more Baltimore street corners." He described Baltimore as a city "where too many street corners are just places where drug deals take place and where gunfire inevitably follows."
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | April 17, 2008
WASHINGTON -- With his visits to a synagogue and a mosque, his acknowledgment of the sins of Christians against Muslims and Jews, and his decision to establish diplomatic relations with Israel, Pope John Paul II won the appreciation and trust of believers of other faiths the world over. His successor, meeting today with leaders of other faiths during his first American visit, is developing a very different kind of reputation. In his three years as spiritual leader of the world's 1.1 billion Roman Catholics, Pope Benedict XVI has alienated other Christians with his repeated assertion that his is the one true church.
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