Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPaul Giamatti
IN THE NEWS

Paul Giamatti

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 13, 2006
The stunning Lena Olin once said she found men most attractive when they didn't think they were attractive. She was speaking of Oliver Platt in Casanova, but she might have been talking about Paul Giamatti. He earned a cult following by bringing gusto to roles such as the officious, tyrannical radio programmer called Pig Vomit in Private Parts. He won widespread acclaim as the cantankerous cartoonist Harvey Pekar in American Splendor. But he found a whole new following as the depressed, divorced novelist and wine expert in Sideways who stumbles into love with that knockout Virginia Madsen.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 4, 2009
"Cold Souls" is hot stuff. It centers on a New York actor named Paul Giamatti and played by Paul Giamatti. While experiencing spiritual fatigue during rehearsals for Chekhov's "Uncle Vanya," Giamatti Squared takes advantage of the latest existential service written up in the New Yorker magazine. He has his soul extracted and puts it into storage. This film isn't really about a soul on ice. Because the movie's "Paul Giamatti" derives from the screen persona of, yes, Paul Giamatti - that huddle of broiling instincts, out-of-control impulses and aggravated ardor epitomized in "Sideways" - you feel his soul's absence as dearly as its presence.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff | January 30, 2005
Did you hear the one about the middle-aged writer guy who walks into his newsroom after the Oscar nominations are announced? He's assigned to write about one of the leading actors in question. He's you, his editor says. Of course he is, writer guy says, knowing his barely perceptible Johnny Depp-ish-ness has always made an impression in the newsroom among, you know, the ladies. "Paul Giamatti," his editor corrects. Paul Giamatti? You mean, Pig Vomit? Giamatti, as most people know by now, plays the shlubby-looking, thin-skinned, temperamental, self-pitying guy who bounces off the walls of life in Sideways -- forever searching for identity, love, and a really good Pinot Noir.
FEATURES
June 6, 2009
Actress Lori Petty charged with drunken driving Lori Petty is facing two drunken driving charges. A spokesman for the Los Angeles City Attorney's Office says the 45-year-old Tank Girl actress was charged Friday with two misdemeanor counts of driving under the influence with injuries stemming from a May 30 arrest. Petty was arrested after allegedly hitting a skateboarder with her car in the city's Venice Beach area. Spokesman Frank Mateljan (mah-TELL'-jen) says the actress was also charged with driving without proof of insurance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 7, 2003
Harvey Pekar, the author and subject of the cult comic book American Splendor, cannily courted the post-counterculture crowd when he appeared on The David Letterman Show in the 1980s. One of the happiest payoffs of his self-promotion is the new movie American Splendor, which tells the rags-to-more-rags story of Pekar's life as a jazz critic and collector, Veterans Administration hospital clerk, struggling comic-book writer, three-time husband and cancer survivor. The movie plunks down animated Pekars, and near-direct lifts from his comics, in the midst of scripted, live-action scenes.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | August 24, 2007
Real experience gets played as farce and then replayed as soap opera in The Nanny Diaries, which wants to be a "you'll laugh, you'll cry" kind of movie but is more like "you'll snicker, you'll doze." The heroine, Annie Braddock (Scarlett Johansson), is a would-be anthropologist who initially fantasizes that she can be a real-life Mary Poppins to a tyke named Grayer (Nicholas Art). His parents, cleverly referred to only as Mr. and Mrs. X (Paul Giamatti and Laura Linney), get caught up in a marital Armageddon and leave all the child care to Annie.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 4, 2009
"Cold Souls" is hot stuff. It centers on a New York actor named Paul Giamatti and played by Paul Giamatti. While experiencing spiritual fatigue during rehearsals for Chekhov's "Uncle Vanya," Giamatti Squared takes advantage of the latest existential service written up in the New Yorker magazine. He has his soul extracted and puts it into storage. This film isn't really about a soul on ice. Because the movie's "Paul Giamatti" derives from the screen persona of, yes, Paul Giamatti - that huddle of broiling instincts, out-of-control impulses and aggravated ardor epitomized in "Sideways" - you feel his soul's absence as dearly as its presence.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 18, 2006
To billions of filmgoers, the essence of "movieness" may be something immediate, simple and viscerally satisfying, like snakes on a plane. But to an equally red-blooded audience with a taste for romantic conspiracy, movieness could be action filled with the white and black magic of political subterfuge and hocus-pocus. A time and place draped in elegant or risky mysteries like turn-of-the-century Vienna. And characters exuding intrigue - from a low-born illusionist named Eisenheim (Edward Norton)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 9, 2002
An amusing take on the old "Boy who cried wolf" theme (and fortunately, in this version, the boy doesn't get eaten in the end), Big Fat Liar benefits from assured performances from a pair of young old pros and a script that's consistently lighthearted, if not light-footed. The movie stars Frankie Muniz (Fox TV's Malcolm in the Middle) and Amanda Bynes (Nickelodeon's The Amanda Show) as a pair of resourceful kids out to get an amoral Hollywood producer (a hyperkinetic Paul Giamatti) to do the right thing.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | September 15, 2000
"Duets" is a romantic ensemble drama-slash-road movie that takes place in the rarified parallel universe of karaoke. Like fans of "Star Trek" and other sub-cultures, karaoke has its own devoted partisans, people who live for the night at their local bar, where they can sing along to pre-recorded versions of their favorite songs to the delight or agony of their fellow crooners. It's a rich human vein to tap, but "Duets" uses karaoke as a backdrop, without providing a deeper context. The movie follows three duos who've been thrown together by fate - each of whom is travelling to a karaoke championship in Omaha, where their destinies, inevitably, catch up with them.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | March 20, 2009
Nothing is as it seems" in the Julia Roberts-Clive Owen corporate-espionage comedy-drama Duplicity. Take that as a blanket spoiler-alert. The strategy of the movie is to keep viewers alternately engaged and bemused, knowing they'll be tricked while feeling pleasurably gamed. Whipping audiences through multiple intrigues across the globe, Duplicity is like Mr. and Mrs. Smith with an intricate, real story and juicy cloak and dagger instead of hyperbolic gunplay. It's an odd duck: a labor-intensive piece of light entertainment.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | March 16, 2008
The leading man is a short, bald, pot-bellied lawyer with a passion for reading Latin and a habit of making enemies. The leading lady quotes Shakespeare, dresses modestly and seldom looks like she's having fun. The opening hour unfolds against a backdrop of mud, snow and the endless gray of a New England winter. And all seven hours are filled with talk in historically accurate English accents about big ideas from the 18th century like life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. This is not exactly the stuff of which TV miniseries are usually made.
FEATURES
By Capsules by Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach | November 16, 2007
Capsules by Michael Sragow and Chris Kaltenbach unless noted. Full reviews are at baltimore sun.com/movies. American Gangster -- A Harlem, N.Y., criminal mastermind puts together a heroin operation with drugs smuggled out of Vietnam in soldiers' coffins and a wholesome army of outlaws. It plays like a deluxe network-TV miniseries, but with all the nudity, profanity and gore the networks would cut out. (M.S.) R 160 minutes C+ Bee Movie -- Jerry Seinfeld's Barry B. Benson, a squat, big-eyed buzzer, attempts to break out of a job stirring honey in the hive and ends up falling for a human florist (Renee Zellweger)
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2007
American Gangster What it's about: A Harlem criminal mastermind puts together a huge heroin operation with drugs smuggled out of Vietnam in soldiers' coffins and a wholesome army of outlaws. Rated: R The scoop: It plays like a deluxe network-TV miniseries, but with all the nudity, profanity and gore the networks would cut out. Grade: C+ Bee Movie What it's about: Jerry Seinfeld's Barry B. Benson, a squat, big-eyed buzzer, attempts to break out of a job stirring honey in the hive and ends up falling for a human florist (Renee Zellweger)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | August 24, 2007
Real experience gets played as farce and then replayed as soap opera in The Nanny Diaries, which wants to be a "you'll laugh, you'll cry" kind of movie but is more like "you'll snicker, you'll doze." The heroine, Annie Braddock (Scarlett Johansson), is a would-be anthropologist who initially fantasizes that she can be a real-life Mary Poppins to a tyke named Grayer (Nicholas Art). His parents, cleverly referred to only as Mr. and Mrs. X (Paul Giamatti and Laura Linney), get caught up in a marital Armageddon and leave all the child care to Annie.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 18, 2006
To billions of filmgoers, the essence of "movieness" may be something immediate, simple and viscerally satisfying, like snakes on a plane. But to an equally red-blooded audience with a taste for romantic conspiracy, movieness could be action filled with the white and black magic of political subterfuge and hocus-pocus. A time and place draped in elegant or risky mysteries like turn-of-the-century Vienna. And characters exuding intrigue - from a low-born illusionist named Eisenheim (Edward Norton)
FEATURES
June 6, 2009
Actress Lori Petty charged with drunken driving Lori Petty is facing two drunken driving charges. A spokesman for the Los Angeles City Attorney's Office says the 45-year-old Tank Girl actress was charged Friday with two misdemeanor counts of driving under the influence with injuries stemming from a May 30 arrest. Petty was arrested after allegedly hitting a skateboarder with her car in the city's Venice Beach area. Spokesman Frank Mateljan (mah-TELL'-jen) says the actress was also charged with driving without proof of insurance.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | March 20, 2009
Nothing is as it seems" in the Julia Roberts-Clive Owen corporate-espionage comedy-drama Duplicity. Take that as a blanket spoiler-alert. The strategy of the movie is to keep viewers alternately engaged and bemused, knowing they'll be tricked while feeling pleasurably gamed. Whipping audiences through multiple intrigues across the globe, Duplicity is like Mr. and Mrs. Smith with an intricate, real story and juicy cloak and dagger instead of hyperbolic gunplay. It's an odd duck: a labor-intensive piece of light entertainment.
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 13, 2006
The stunning Lena Olin once said she found men most attractive when they didn't think they were attractive. She was speaking of Oliver Platt in Casanova, but she might have been talking about Paul Giamatti. He earned a cult following by bringing gusto to roles such as the officious, tyrannical radio programmer called Pig Vomit in Private Parts. He won widespread acclaim as the cantankerous cartoonist Harvey Pekar in American Splendor. But he found a whole new following as the depressed, divorced novelist and wine expert in Sideways who stumbles into love with that knockout Virginia Madsen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff | January 30, 2005
Did you hear the one about the middle-aged writer guy who walks into his newsroom after the Oscar nominations are announced? He's assigned to write about one of the leading actors in question. He's you, his editor says. Of course he is, writer guy says, knowing his barely perceptible Johnny Depp-ish-ness has always made an impression in the newsroom among, you know, the ladies. "Paul Giamatti," his editor corrects. Paul Giamatti? You mean, Pig Vomit? Giamatti, as most people know by now, plays the shlubby-looking, thin-skinned, temperamental, self-pitying guy who bounces off the walls of life in Sideways -- forever searching for identity, love, and a really good Pinot Noir.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.