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Paul Gauguin

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NEWS
March 24, 1996
"Insects Through the Seasons," by Gilbert Waldbauer. Harvard U. Press. 289 pages. $24.95. The professor emeritus of entomology at the University of Illinois makes clear that we should all be thankful that insects are there. He strays from insects to spiders, birds, fish, frogs, and occasionally people. His style is lively and light, and he manages to explain scientific evidence behind the ideas he presents without lapsing into jargon. The book rambles, but overall, it delivers a sophisticated view of ecology, evolution and animal behavior in language that kids could enjoy.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Colonial Players' production of Steven Dietz's "Inventing van Gogh" provides an intriguing set of mysteries about the existence of a mythical last self-portrait by the artist, the man himself and the modern art scene. First-time CP director Michelle Harmon rates high marks for meeting the challenges that arose during production. She had signed on to direct "Radio Golf" by August Wilson, which ended up being pulled from the schedule "because of rights issues. " "Inventing van Gogh" was chosen as a replacement.
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NEWS
November 20, 1994
The Walters Art Gallery's impressive show, "Gauguin and the School of Pont-Aven," opens today, making Baltimore the only East Coast venue for this important collection of Post-Impressionist paintings.Paul Gauguin was a seminal figure in the group that spent summers in the French village of Pont-Aven in the 1880s and 1890s, devising a painting theory based not on the way objects appeared to the eye but on the artist's emotional response to a scene.Pont-Aven in Brittany became a magnet for younger artists, attracted by the province's rugged landscapes, simple peasants and low costs.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | September 23, 2007
Painter Tonya Ingersol followed in the footsteps of her father, Baltimore philanthropist Eddie Brown, and spent nearly a decade working the rarefied precincts of high finance in New York and Dallas. Then, like artists Jeff Koons and Paul Gauguin before her, she switched careers, earning a Master of Fine Arts degree at the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2002. She's been a full-time painter ever since, working eight hours a day, six days a week in her Mount Vernon studio. Recently, she began preparing for her next show, which opens Oct. 6 at Galerie Francoise II in Woodberry.
NEWS
By Glenn McNatt | September 23, 2007
Painter Tonya Ingersol followed in the footsteps of her father, Baltimore philanthropist Eddie Brown, and spent nearly a decade working the rarefied precincts of high finance in New York and Dallas. Then, like artists Jeff Koons and Paul Gauguin before her, she switched careers, earning a Master of Fine Arts degree at the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2002. She's been a full-time painter ever since, working eight hours a day, six days a week in her Mount Vernon studio. Recently, she began preparing for her next show, which opens Oct. 6 at Galerie Francoise II in Woodberry.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
Colonial Players' production of Steven Dietz's "Inventing van Gogh" provides an intriguing set of mysteries about the existence of a mythical last self-portrait by the artist, the man himself and the modern art scene. First-time CP director Michelle Harmon rates high marks for meeting the challenges that arose during production. She had signed on to direct "Radio Golf" by August Wilson, which ended up being pulled from the schedule "because of rights issues. " "Inventing van Gogh" was chosen as a replacement.
NEWS
By Holland Cotter and Holland Cotter,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 21, 2002
NEW YORK - Paul Gauguin (1848-1903) liked attention. He wore funny clothes, said shocking things, painted gorgeous pictures and traveled halfway around the world to get it. His efforts paid off. When he died of syphilis at 54 on an island in the South Pacific, people around the world took notice, and they have been noticing him ever since. So it's surprising to learn that "Gauguin in New York Collections: The Lure of the Exotic," at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, is the first major New York-area exhibition devoted to him in more than 40 years.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 20, 1994
In the late 1880s, Paul Gauguin and a group of other artists put Pont-Aven on the map of art history. Working in that small Brittany town, they moved art an essential step beyond impressionism and toward the art of the 20th century.That step can be seen through the exhibit, "Gauguin and the School of Pont-Aven," opening today at the Walters Art Gallery and running through Jan. 15.But, up front, two points need to be made:First, this exhibit is not what museum-goers could easily be led to think from its billing.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1996
An exhibition of the Baltimore Museum of Art's renowned Cone Collection will travel overseas for the first time this fall -- when the museum sends to Japan a selection of works including 65 paintings, sculptures and drawings by Henri Matisse, the museum announced yesterday."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey | December 2, 1994
Last week, the Walters Art Gallery recorded its highest weekly attendance, with 11,500 paid admissions. A daily record high was set last Friday, with 4,200 attendance.The record crowds are flocking to "Gauguin and the School of Pont-Aven," a show of more than 100 works by Paul Gauguin and others who worked in the small Brittany town of Pont-Aven in the 1880s.The show, which deals with a period when art was moving past impressionism and toward the art of the 20th century, continues through Jan. 15 at the Walters, its only East Coast venue.
NEWS
By Holland Cotter and Holland Cotter,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 21, 2002
NEW YORK - Paul Gauguin (1848-1903) liked attention. He wore funny clothes, said shocking things, painted gorgeous pictures and traveled halfway around the world to get it. His efforts paid off. When he died of syphilis at 54 on an island in the South Pacific, people around the world took notice, and they have been noticing him ever since. So it's surprising to learn that "Gauguin in New York Collections: The Lure of the Exotic," at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, is the first major New York-area exhibition devoted to him in more than 40 years.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | June 28, 1996
An exhibition of the Baltimore Museum of Art's renowned Cone Collection will travel overseas for the first time this fall -- when the museum sends to Japan a selection of works including 65 paintings, sculptures and drawings by Henri Matisse, the museum announced yesterday."
NEWS
March 24, 1996
"Insects Through the Seasons," by Gilbert Waldbauer. Harvard U. Press. 289 pages. $24.95. The professor emeritus of entomology at the University of Illinois makes clear that we should all be thankful that insects are there. He strays from insects to spiders, birds, fish, frogs, and occasionally people. His style is lively and light, and he manages to explain scientific evidence behind the ideas he presents without lapsing into jargon. The book rambles, but overall, it delivers a sophisticated view of ecology, evolution and animal behavior in language that kids could enjoy.
NEWS
November 20, 1994
The Walters Art Gallery's impressive show, "Gauguin and the School of Pont-Aven," opens today, making Baltimore the only East Coast venue for this important collection of Post-Impressionist paintings.Paul Gauguin was a seminal figure in the group that spent summers in the French village of Pont-Aven in the 1880s and 1890s, devising a painting theory based not on the way objects appeared to the eye but on the artist's emotional response to a scene.Pont-Aven in Brittany became a magnet for younger artists, attracted by the province's rugged landscapes, simple peasants and low costs.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 20, 1994
In the late 1880s, Paul Gauguin and a group of other artists put Pont-Aven on the map of art history. Working in that small Brittany town, they moved art an essential step beyond impressionism and toward the art of the 20th century.That step can be seen through the exhibit, "Gauguin and the School of Pont-Aven," opening today at the Walters Art Gallery and running through Jan. 15.But, up front, two points need to be made:First, this exhibit is not what museum-goers could easily be led to think from its billing.
NEWS
June 12, 1992
THROUGHOUT the centuries, arguments have raged over the question of what is art. Here are some of the answers given by artists themselves."I feel that art has something to do with the achievement of stillness in the midst of chaos. A stillness which characterizes prayer, too, and the eye of the storm. I think that art has something to do with an arrest of attention in the midst of distraction."-- Saul Bellow."What was any art but an effort to make a sheath, a mould in which to imprison for a moment, the shining, elusive element which is life itself?"
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | December 24, 1990
''Vincent & Theo'' is Robert Altman's long and languid story of the Van Gogh brothers, Vincent and Theo, whose lives were anything but joyous.It is easy enough to walk out of the film in the first hour, but Altman's method becomes more apparent as the film moves along. And the movie, if not always dramatically stirring, does look good.The tough part is staying with it long enough to become involved. ''Vincent & Theo'' is undoubtely helped by the fact that Altman and his camera men try to approximate the primary colors with which Van Gogh dealt.
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