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By CHRIS MATTHEWS | September 29, 1994
Washington. -- Three years ago, a senator from Pennsylvania was killed in an airplane crash. Harris Wofford, the Democrat chosen to fill his seat, faced an instant threat. His Republican rival, former governor Dick Thornburgh, was 40 points ahead in the polls. To turn things around, the Wofford-for-Senate campaign needed a powerhouse campaign issue.It picked health care.At first, the choice seemed an odd one. Here was a blue-collar state full of small coal, steel and farming towns hurting from recession.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
Maybe it's just me, but a fundraising letter I received from CNN's Paul Begala last week struck me as emblematic of what's wrong when media are mixed with money and politics -- as they increasingly are these days at cable TV news channels in Washington. Here's the letter. And you tell me if this is appropriate for someone listed as "commentator" at CNN -- someone who also appears on the channel's website under the heading "Anchors/Reporters" as Begala does in the screenshot above.
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NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 9, 2004
WASHINGTON - Before former President Bill Clinton went under the knife for heart surgery, news reports say, he offered 90 minutes of advice by telephone from his hospital bed to Sen. John Kerry on how Mr. Kerry could revive his presidential candidacy. That would be a phone chat on which I would love to have had a wiretap. Imagine its educational, as well as entertainment, value. Mr. Kerry could hardly find a better tutor than Mr. Clinton, the self-declared "Comeback Kid" who made his second-place finish in the 1992 New Hampshire primary sound like a landslide victory.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 9, 2004
WASHINGTON - Before former President Bill Clinton went under the knife for heart surgery, news reports say, he offered 90 minutes of advice by telephone from his hospital bed to Sen. John Kerry on how Mr. Kerry could revive his presidential candidacy. That would be a phone chat on which I would love to have had a wiretap. Imagine its educational, as well as entertainment, value. Mr. Kerry could hardly find a better tutor than Mr. Clinton, the self-declared "Comeback Kid" who made his second-place finish in the 1992 New Hampshire primary sound like a landslide victory.
NEWS
By Ronald Walters | July 18, 1993
MAD AS HELL: REVOLT AT THEBALLOT BOX, 1992Jack Germond and Jules WitcoverWarner Books518 pages, $24.95More than a simple review of the 1992 presidential election, "Mad As Hell: Revolt at the Ballot Box, 1992" goes behind the scenes of the major political events to provide a first-hand account from the campaign operatives who were responsible for addressing them. As such, this book by Sun political columnists Jack Germond and Jules Witcover covers not only election year issues, but traces their roots so the reader can understand how they emerged within the context of the campaign.
NEWS
By SUSAN BAER | April 11, 1993
Washington.-- Like the health care reform plan she is spearheading, the image of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton is still very much a work in progress.As she maps out a health care blueprint behind closed doors, Mrs. Clinton, out of commission lately because of the illness and death of her father, is also carefully, shrewdly charting her way in the public eye.Mindful of her place in what is unquestionably the hottest seat in Washington and the price of a misspoken word, her moves are more cautious and calculated -- and covert -- than the president's.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2013
Maybe it's just me, but a fundraising letter I received from CNN's Paul Begala last week struck me as emblematic of what's wrong when media are mixed with money and politics -- as they increasingly are these days at cable TV news channels in Washington. Here's the letter. And you tell me if this is appropriate for someone listed as "commentator" at CNN -- someone who also appears on the channel's website under the heading "Anchors/Reporters" as Begala does in the screenshot above.
NEWS
By CARL M. CANNON and NELSON SCHWARTZ | June 27, 1993
Washington. -- Maybe this is what President Clinton meant by "re-inventing government": Call it government by "trial balloon."On almost every major issue facing the administration -- issues ranging from U.S. military strategy to key personnel appointments to a vast overhaul of health care -- the Clinton administration routinely floats an idea or a name or an approach so that it can gauge public opinion before it acts.Going back to Franklin D. Roosevelt, presidents have used leaks to "run things up the flag pole and see if anyone salutes," in the words of William Leuchtenberg, a professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the author of several books on the presidency.
NEWS
By Tom Baxter | February 5, 1993
IF THOSE who have complained so loudly about talk radio in the past few days have their political wits about them, they will quit worrying about how reactionary, unfair and distorted it is, and figure out what to do about it.Right-wing radio shows have been around since the late Joe Pyne. But they have suddenly become a hot topic because of the role they played in the fall of Zoe Baird and the furor over gays in the military. The tidal wave of telephone calls they generated are this week's manifestation of the new age of interactive media, which is changing all politics in its wake.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | May 3, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Noting a recent poll showing that 39 percent of Americans disapprove of President Clinton's foreign policy, comedian David Letterman feigned surprise: "I had no idea that he had a foreign policy."Late-night ridicule might be the ultimate put-down for a foreign policy often criticized as unfocused, unimaginative and reactive in an uncertain world in which United States leadership is seen as crucial.With such perceptions growing, and eroding Mr. Clinton's support, the president will make a major attempt tonight to demonstrate he is on top of foreign policy when he submits to 90 minutes of questioning on CNN. It will be his most lengthy public discussion of these issues since he took office; and it will be watched not only by the American public but by foreign leaders taking stock.
NEWS
By CHRIS MATTHEWS | September 29, 1994
Washington. -- Three years ago, a senator from Pennsylvania was killed in an airplane crash. Harris Wofford, the Democrat chosen to fill his seat, faced an instant threat. His Republican rival, former governor Dick Thornburgh, was 40 points ahead in the polls. To turn things around, the Wofford-for-Senate campaign needed a powerhouse campaign issue.It picked health care.At first, the choice seemed an odd one. Here was a blue-collar state full of small coal, steel and farming towns hurting from recession.
NEWS
By Ronald Walters | July 18, 1993
MAD AS HELL: REVOLT AT THEBALLOT BOX, 1992Jack Germond and Jules WitcoverWarner Books518 pages, $24.95More than a simple review of the 1992 presidential election, "Mad As Hell: Revolt at the Ballot Box, 1992" goes behind the scenes of the major political events to provide a first-hand account from the campaign operatives who were responsible for addressing them. As such, this book by Sun political columnists Jack Germond and Jules Witcover covers not only election year issues, but traces their roots so the reader can understand how they emerged within the context of the campaign.
NEWS
By SUSAN BAER | April 11, 1993
Washington.-- Like the health care reform plan she is spearheading, the image of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton is still very much a work in progress.As she maps out a health care blueprint behind closed doors, Mrs. Clinton, out of commission lately because of the illness and death of her father, is also carefully, shrewdly charting her way in the public eye.Mindful of her place in what is unquestionably the hottest seat in Washington and the price of a misspoken word, her moves are more cautious and calculated -- and covert -- than the president's.
NEWS
November 2, 2012
For four years, President Barack Obama has had a shot. We, as a collective society, have defined his actions as successes or failures, and we have frequently been very harsh in those judgments. Because of that, I have to put in a word about expectations. The economy, not only the U.S. economy but the international economy as well, was in a state of devastating decline from 2007 to 2011. We lived through the worst drop in international trade the world has ever seen. The Obama administration has done its best, but we can only expect so much from a government that, compared to other countries in the world, doesn't have very much power to intervene in the economic sphere.
NEWS
June 12, 1994
Robert E. Rubin, chairman of the National Economic Council, was much too quick in denying that Federal Reserve Board chairman Alan Greenspan has been "a senior adviser, almost a teacher to [President] Clinton" -- a description appearing in a new book by journalist Bob Woodward of Watergate fame. In asserting that the president "relates to Alan Greenspan the way he relates to" other economic policy advisers, Mr. Rubin turned the usual White House spin into quite a stretch.The fact is that no president relates to the Fed chairman of the moment as though he were just another adviser.
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